Animal identification

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Calf identified with ear tag and transponder

Animal identification using a means of marking is a process done to identify and track specific animals. It is done for a variety of reasons including verification of ownership, biosecurity control, and tracking for research or agricultural purposes.

History[edit]

Individual identification of animals by means of body markings has been practised for over 3,800 years, as stated in Code of Hammurabi.[1] The first official identification systems are documented as far as the 18th century. In Uruguay for instance maintained at that time a register of hot brands.[2]

Methods[edit]

Birds[edit]

Sheep[edit]

Pigs[edit]

  • Collars (electronic and non-electronic)
  • Earmarking
  • Ear tags (non-electronic)
  • Ear tags (electronic)
  • Semi-permanent paint
  • Tattoo

Horses[edit]

Cattle[edit]

Dogs[edit]

Laboratory mice[edit]

Fish[edit]

Marine mammals[edit]

  • Transponders
  • Adhesive tags

Invertebrates[edit]

  • Adhesive tags
  • Semi-permanent paint

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ 'Toe clipping' in mice involves the full or partial amputation of one or more digits as a means of permanent identification.

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Blancou, J (2001). "A history of the traceability of animals and animal products". Revue scientifique et technique (International Office of Epizootics) 20 (2): 413–25. PMID 11548516.  edit
  2. ^ http://www.allflex-group.com/front-offices/anglais/119-the_history_of_livestock_identification.aspx?idparentnode=120