Animalism (philosophy)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Not to be confused with the fictional philosophy from Animal Farm, or with Animism.

In philosophy, animalism is a theory about personal identity according to which personal identity is a biological property of human beings, just as it is for other animals.[1] Animalism is not a theory about personhood, that is, a theory about what it means to be a person. An animalist could hold that robots or angels were persons without that contradicting his animalism.[2]

According to the German philosopher W. Sombart, "Animalism", in opposition to "Hominism", contains every ideology that gives up the notion of humans possessing a life-form of their own, and understands them as a part of nature, as an animal species.[3]

The concept of animalism is among interests of philosophers Eric T. Olson and David Wiggins.[4][5]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Baker, Lynne Rudder. 'When Does a Person Begin?', in Ellen Frankel Paul, Fred Dycus Miller, and Jeffrey Paul (eds.), Personal Identity, Cambridge University Press, 2005, p. 39.
  2. ^ Eric T. Olson (2007) What are we?: a study in personal ontology, Oxford University Press, section 2.1.
  3. ^ (Historisches Wörterbuch der philosophie, 1971 Historical Dictionary of Philosophy )
  4. ^ Olson, Eric T. What are we?: a study in personal ontology, Oxford University Press, 2007.
  5. ^ Brian Garrett, Personal Identity and Self-Consciousness. Routledge, 1998. 137 pages. ISBN 0-415-16573-3

References[edit]

  • Baker, Lynne Rudder. 'When Does a Person Begin?', in Ellen Frankel Paul, Fred Dycus Miller, and Jeffrey Paul (eds.), Personal Identity, Cambridge University Press, 2005
  • Blatti, Stephan, "Animalism", The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Summer 2014 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.), forthcoming URL = <http://plato.stanford.edu/archives/sum2014/entries/animalism/>.
  • Olson, Eric T. What are we?: a study in personal ontology, Oxford University Press, 2007.