4-Anisaldehyde

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4-Anisaldehyde[1]
Anisaldehyde
Names
IUPAC name
4-Methoxybenzaldehyde
Identifiers
123-11-5 YesY
ChEMBL ChEMBL161598 N
ChemSpider 28984 YesY
21105937
Jmol-3D images Image
PubChem 31244
UNII 9PA5V6656V YesY
Properties
C8H8O2
Molar mass 136.15 g/mol
Density 1.119 g/cm³ at 15 °C
Melting point 0 °C (32 °F; 273 K)
Boiling point 248 °C (478 °F; 521 K)
Hazards
Flash point 108 °C (226 °F; 381 K)
Except where noted otherwise, data is given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C (77 °F), 100 kPa)
 N verify (what isYesY/N?)
Infobox references

4-Anisaldehyde (also: p-anisaldehyde, anisic aldehyde, anise aldehyde) is an organic compound that is commonly encountered in the fragrances, both synthetic and natural. The compound consists of a benzene ring with an aldehyde and a methoxy group. It is a clear liquid with a strong aroma. Two related isomers ortho-anisaldehyde and meta-anisaldehyde are also known but less commonly encountered. It provides sweet, floral and strong almond odor. Atul Ltd, India is the largest manufacturer of Anisaldehyde in the world.

Production[edit]

Anisaldehyde is prepared commercially by oxidation of methoxytoluene (p-cresyl methyl ether) using manganese dioxide. It can also be produced by oxidation of anethole, a related fragrance that is found in some alcoholic beverages.[2]

Uses[edit]

Being structurally related to vanillin, anisaldehyde is a widely used in the fragrance and flavor industry.[2] Anisaldehyde is used as an intermediate in the synthesis of other compounds important in pharmaceuticals and perfumery. ortho-Anisaldehyde has a scent of licorice.

A solution of para-anisaldehyde in acid and ethanol is a useful stain in thin layer chromatography. Different chemical compounds on the plate can give different colors, allowing easy distinction.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Merck Index, 11th Edition, 693
  2. ^ a b Karl-Georg Fahlbusch, Franz-Josef Hammerschmidt, Johannes Panten, Wilhelm Pickenhagen, Dietmar Schatkowski, , Kurt Bauer, Dorothea Garbe and Horst Surburg "Flavors and Fragrances" in Ullmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry, Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 2003. doi:10.1002/14356007.a11_141