Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology

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Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology
Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology logo.png
Founded 1997
Founder Anita Borg
Type Nonprofit organization
(IRS exemption status): 501(c)(3)[1]
Focus Women in Computing
Location
Area served Global
Method Industry partnership and sponsorship and individual donations
Key people Anita Borg, founder
Telle Whitney, President & CEO
Website anitaborg.org
Formerly called Institute for Women and Technology
(1997–2003)

The Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology is a nonprofit organization founded by computer scientist Anita Borg. The institute’s primary aim is to recruit, retain, and advance women in technology. The institute’s most prominent program is the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing Conference, the world’s largest gathering of women in computing.[2] Based in Palo Alto, California, the Anita Borg Institute for Women in Technology is currently headed by Telle Whitney, who co-founded the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing with Anita Borg.[3]

History[edit]

The Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology was founded in 1997 by Anita Borg as the Institute for Women in Technology. The institute was preceded by two of its current programs: Systers and the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing. Systers, the first online community for women in computing, was founded in 1987 by Anita Borg. In 1994, Borg and Telle Whitney organized the first Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing. Anita Borg served as CEO of the Institute for Women and Technology from 1997 to 2002.[4] In 2002, Whitney became CEO and President, and in 2003, the institute was renamed the Anita Borg Institute for Women in Technology.[5][6]

Mission[edit]

As stated on its website, the mission of the Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology is to:

  • increase the impact of women on all aspects of technology, and
  • increase the positive impact of technology on the world’s women[7]

Activities[edit]

Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing Conference[edit]

The Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing is the world’s largest gathering of women in computing. Named in honor of Rear Admiral Grace Murray Hopper, the conference is presented by the Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology and the Association for Computing Machinery. The conference features technical sessions and career sessions, including keynote speakers, a poster session, career fair, and awards ceremony.[8] The 2011 conference will be held in Portland, Oregon.[9]

The Technical Executive Forum, held annually at the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing, brings together high-level technology executives to discuss challenges and solutions for recruiting, retaining, and advancing technical women.[10] A two-day workshop for K-12 computer science teachers is also held at the conference, hosted by the Computer Science Teachers Association and the Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology.[11]

Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing India[edit]

The Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing India is the largest conference for technical women in India. Established in 2010, the two-day conference is modeled after the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing and includes multiple tracks with keynote speakers, panels, birds of a feather sessions, and a poster session.[12]

Grace Hopper Regional Consortium[edit]

The Grace Hopper Regional Consortium is an initiative of the Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology, the ACM Council on Women in Computing, and the National Center for Women and Information Technology (NCWIT). Two-day regional conferences attract between 50 and 200 attendees and include keynote speakers, poster sessions, panel discussions, professional development workshops, birds of a feather sessions, and research presentations.[13] There have been 17 regional conferences to date, with 12 upcoming conferences planned.[14]

Anita Borg Institute Women of Vision Awards[edit]

The Anita Borg Institute Women of Vision Awards is an annual awards program that honors technical women. Three awards are presented each year, in categories of Innovation, Leadership, and Social Impact, at the annual Women of Vision Awards Banquet.[15] Past Anita Borg Institute Women of Vision Award winners include: Mary Lou Jepsen, Kristina M. Johnson, Mitchell Baker, Helen Greiner, Susan Landau, Justine Cassell, Deborah Estrin, Leah Jamieson, Duy-Loan Le, Radia Perlman, and Pamela Samuelson.[16][17][18][19][20][21]

Anita Borg Top Company for Technical Women Award[edit]

The Anita Borg Top Company for Technical Women Award recognizes companies for their recruitment, retention, and advancement of technical women. The first Anita Borg Top Company for Technical Women Award was awarded to IBM in 2011.[22] Subsequent recipients include:

Anita Borg Top Company for Technical Women Workshop[edit]

The Anita Borg Top Company for Technical Women Workshop provides coverage of best practices for recruiting, retaining, and advancing technical women. Representatives from different companies learn from each other and share practices. Companies participating in the 2011 workshop included CA Technologies, Cisco, Google, IBM, Intel Corporation, Intuit, Microsoft Research, SAP, and Symantec.[26]

Awards[edit]

The Anita Borg Institute presents a number of awards annually at the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing to recognize technical women and those who support them. These include: Anita Borg Social Impact Award, Anita Borg Technical Leadership Award, Denice Denton Emerging Leader Award, A. Richard Newton Educator Award, Anita Borg Change Agent Awards, and TechWomen Change Agent Awards.[27]

TechWomen[edit]

TechWomen is a professional mentorship and exchange program funded by the US Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. The program brings 38 technical women, aged 25–42, from the Middle East and North Africa to the United States for a five-week mentoring program at technology companies in Silicon Valley. The initiative is administered by the Institute of International Education, in partnership with the Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology.[28]

Online Communities[edit]

The Anita Borg Institute runs several email lists and online groups that connect technical women. Systers is the largest email community of technical women in computing in the world and predates the Anita Borg Institute, having been founded in 1987 by Anita Borg. Systers provides a private space for women in computing to ask personal and technical questions.[29]

Research[edit]

The Anita Borg Institute publishes research about the state of women in technology. Past reports have focused on mid-level technical women, minorities in computing, senior technical women, and more.[30][31][32]

Corporate Partners[edit]

The Anita Borg Institute is supported by corporate partners, from both within and outside of the technology sector. Current partners include: Google, HP, Microsoft, CA Technologies, Cisco, Facebook, First Republic Bank, IBM, Intel, Intuit, Lockheed Martin, National Science Foundation, National Security Agency, NetApp, SAP, Symantec, Thomson Reuters, Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati, Amazon, Broadcom, Motorola Foundation, Raytheon, Salesforce, and Yahoo! .[33]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ anitaborg.org [1], accessed 2011-06-27
  2. ^ "Registration Now Open for the 2011 Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing". gracehopper.org. Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology. 7 June 2011. Retrieved 27 June 2011. 
  3. ^ Anderson, Melissa (11 May 2011). "Telle Whitney, CEO and President, Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology". The Glass Hammer. Evolved People Media LLC. Retrieved 27 June 2011. 
  4. ^ Hafner, Katie (10 April 2003). "Anita Borg, 54, Trailblazer For Women in Computer Field". NYTimes. New York Times. Retrieved 21 June 2011. 
  5. ^ "The Most Influential Women in Technology: Telle Whitney". Fast Company. Archived from the original on 5 July 2011. Retrieved 23 June 2011. 
  6. ^ "Grace Hopper celebration gathers women techies from around the world". Diversity/Careers. June–July 2008. Retrieved 28 June 2011. 
  7. ^ "About Us: Mission". Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology. Retrieved 25 June 2011. 
  8. ^ Ordille, Joann J. (January 2010). "CRA-W Showcases Its Programs at the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing". Computing Research News (Computing Research Association) 22 (1). Retrieved 26 June 2011. 
  9. ^ Colborn, Kate (December 2010 – January 2011). "Largest ever Grace Hopper Celebration brings tech women together "across boundaries"". Diversity/Careers. Diversity/Careers. Retrieved 20 June 2011. 
  10. ^ Vivek, Wadwa; Whitney, Telle (8 October 2010). "Practical Ways to Get More Women to Lead Businesses". Bloomberg Businessweek. Bloomberg. Retrieved 28 June 2011. 
  11. ^ "Dr. Suzanne Westbrook Brings First K-12 Computing Teachers Workshop to Tucson". University of Arizona Computer Science Events & News. Arizona Board of Regents. 4 November 2009. Retrieved 28 June 2011. 
  12. ^ "Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology Announces First Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing India". gracehopper.in. Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology. 8 December 2010. Retrieved 25 June 2011. 
  13. ^ "MinneWIC: first upper Midwest conference for women in computing". Diversity/Careers. Diversity/Careers. April–May 2010. Retrieved 26 June 2011. 
  14. ^ "Grace Hopper Regional Consortium". ACM. Archived from the original on 10 July 2011. Retrieved 26 June 2011. 
  15. ^ "Awards encourages women to break tech glass ceiling". ABC7News. Retrieved 28 June 2011. 
  16. ^ Gilmour, Nicki (27 May 2010). "Women in Technology: Staying Technical and the Importance of Being an Expert". ValleyZen. Retrieved 29 June 2011. 
  17. ^ Barrett, Jerri (26 May 2011). "Anita Borg Institute Women of Vision Awards: Inspiration for All". ValleyZen. Retrieved 29 June 2011. 
  18. ^ Mccall, Margo (24 February 2009). "2009 Women of Vision Named". computer.org. IEEE Computer Society. Retrieved 29 June 2011. 
  19. ^ "Women of Vision awards presented at Anita Borg Institute banquet". Diversity/Careers. Diversity/Careers. August–September 2008. Retrieved 29 June 2011. 
  20. ^ "IEEE Annual Report". IEEE Computer Society. 2007. p. 21. Retrieved 29 June 2011. 
  21. ^ Fuller, Brian (18 October 2005). "Perlman, Samuelson, Tsao, honored for innovations". EETimes. UBM Electronics. Retrieved 29 June 2011. 
  22. ^ "IBM Named Top Company for Technical Women - 2011". IBM Systems Magazine. IBM. 29 March 2011. Retrieved 26 June 2011. 
  23. ^ "American Express Named Top Company for Technical Women - 2012". ABI. 2012. 
  24. ^ "Intel Named Top Company for Technical Women - 2013". ABI. 26 February 2013. 
  25. ^ "Bank of America 2014 Top Company for Technical Women". ABI. 18 March 2014. 
  26. ^ "Anita Borg Institute celebrates 2011 Women of Vision". Diversity/Careers. June–July 2011. Retrieved 29 June 2011. 
  27. ^ "Awards » Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology". anitaborg.org. Retrieved 3 August 2011. 
  28. ^ Jaben-Eilon, Jan (2 June 2011). "State Department Launches 'TechWomen'". Womenetics.com. Retrieved 28 June 2011. 
  29. ^ Kadaba, Lini S. (30 May 1995). "Cybersisters Who Order Men To Buzz Off Their Network". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Retrieved 23 June 2011. 
  30. ^ Mackenzie, Lori Nishiura (2 April 2010). "Senior Technical Women: A profile of success". Gender News from the Clayman Institute for Gender and Research. Stanford University. Retrieved 29 June 2011. 
  31. ^ Dubie, Denise (27 October 2009). "Flight risk? High-tech talent set to take off post economic recovery". Network World. Network World, Inc. Retrieved 29 June 2011. 
  32. ^ Ross, Andrew S. (24 November 2008). "Few women at top in Silicon Valley". San Francisco Chronicle. Hearst Communications Inc. Retrieved 29 June 2011. 
  33. ^ "About Us: ABI Partners". Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology. 14 June 2011. Retrieved 24 June 2011. 

External links[edit]