Anjodi

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Anjodi Lock 7 Beziers.JPG
Anjodi in Lock 7 Beziers France.
Career (France) Flag fr-midi pyrénées.png
Name: Anjodi
Owner: European Waterways, LTD
Operator: European Waterways, LTD
Port of registry: Bordeaux
Route: Canal du Midi - Le Somail to Marseillan
Launched: 1929
Christened: Anjodi
Status: In service
General characteristics
Class & type: Commercial passenger vessel
Tonnage: 198
Length: 100 ft (30 m)
Beam: 16.5 ft (5.0 m)
Height: 10 ft (3.0 m)
Draught: 5 ft (1.5 m)
Decks: 2
Installed power: 2 × 220 volt diesel generators 40 kva and 25 kva
Propulsion: single 185 horse power Perkins turbo charged diesel
Speed: cruising speed 4 knots (7.4 km/h), Maximum speed 11 knots (20 km/h)
Capacity: 8 passengers
Crew: 4 crew
Notes: Fuel capacity 3000 litres, Water capacity 10,000 litres, Grey water capacity 1200 litres

Anjodi is a Luxe motor Dutch steel barge built as a trading barge but refitted in 1982 as a hotel barge. She is currently berthed on the Canal du Midi in south-west France.

Anjodi was built in Groningen, Netherlands in 1929 and originally carried grain. She is named after the three daughters of the original owner - Anna, Joanna and Diana. She is constructed of iron with a high copper content which has contributed to her longevity.

Anjodi was purchased by Derek Banks in 1982 from a Dutchman, Fopa de Jong, in Amsterdam for £5,500.[1][2] She was a retired trading barge and full of old Second World War aircraft instruments.

During 1982 and 1983, Anjodi was transformed by European Waterways, from a trade vessel to one of France's first ever luxury hotel barges at the cost of £100,000.[1] Before making the three month trip from the Netherlands to the south of France, Anjodi was towed to a shipyard in Belgium where tanks for fresh water, generators, wiring and plumbing were installed and a shell infrastructure of steel was built.[1] She was refurbished again in 1997[3] and 2008.

Anjodi has four guest bedrooms with private bathrooms and a saloon. Crews quarters are in the bow and stern.[4] The Anjodi has a crew of four: Captain, first mate or matelot, chef, and hostess. The captain must have at least two years experience as a first mate and possess a French certificate of competency.[2]

The Anjodi was featured in the 10 part BBC Series about Chef Rick Stein’s six week journey from Bordeaux to Marseille aboard the Anjodi on the Canal latéral à la Garonne and Canal du Midi.[5] [6] Famous guests who have travelled on the Anjodi include Rod Stewart.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Fuller-Love, Heidi (February 2005). "French Waterways". Living France. 
  2. ^ a b Kay Kritzwiser. "Six slow days on the canal". Globe and Mail. 
  3. ^ Hill, Richard (May 1997). "Lost in France". Canal & Riverboat. 
  4. ^ Deck plan
  5. ^ Pritchard, David (2009). Shooting the cook. FSC AND Harper Colins. ISBN 978-0-00-727830-5. 
  6. ^ Bowler, Vivian (2005). Rick Stein's French Odyssey. BBC Books. ISBN 0-563-52213-5. 

External links[edit]