Anna J. Brown

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Anna J. Brown
Judge for the United States District Court for the District of Oregon
Incumbent
Assumed office
October 26, 1999
Nominated by Bill Clinton
Preceded by Malcolm F. Marsh
Judge for the Multnomah County Circuit Court
In office
1994–1999
Personal details
Born (1952-07-16) July 16, 1952 (age 61)
Portland, Oregon
Alma mater Portland State University
Lewis & Clark Law School

Anna J. Brown (born July 26, 1952)[1] is a United States federal judge in the state of Oregon. A Portland native, she serves on the United States District Court for the District of Oregon.

Early life[edit]

Anna J. Brown was born in Portland, Oregon, in 1952,[2] and attended high school there at St. Mary's Academy where she graduated in 1970.[3] She received a bachelor of science degree from Portland State University in 1975.[2] Brown continued her education at Northwestern School of Law (now Lewis and Clark Law School) where she received a Juris Doctor in 1980.[2] While in law school she worked as a law clerk for judge John C. Beatty of the Multnomah County Circuit Court in Portland from 1978 to 1980.[2] Following law school in 1980, Brown entered private legal practice in Portland where she remained until 1992.[2]

Judicial career[edit]

In 1992, Brown became a judge on the Multnomah County District Court.[2] She was on that court until 1994 when she was elevated to the Multnomah County Circuit Court.[2] On April 22, 1999, Brown was nominated to the federal United States District Court for the District of Oregon by President Bill Clinton.[4] She was confirmed on October 15, 1999, by the United States Senate and received her commission on October 26.[2] Brown replaced Malcolm F. Marsh who had become a senior judge.[2] She is an instructor for the Oregon Law Institute at her law school alma mater.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Anna J. Brown". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Federal Judicial Center. Retrieved 2009-03-06. 
  3. ^ "2003 St. Mary's Academy Awards Recipients". St. Mary's Academy. Retrieved 2009-03-06. [dead link]
  4. ^ Office of the Press Secretary: For Immediate Release April 22, 1999. The White House. Retrieved on March 6, 2009.
  5. ^ "Evidence from the Judges". Oregon Law Institute. Lewis & Clark Law School. Retrieved 2009-03-06. 

External links[edit]