Anna Louise Föhse

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Anna Louise Föhse
Fürstin Anna Luise, Gemälde nach Antoine Pesne.jpg
Anna Louise Föhse, painted by Antoine Pesne
Spouse(s) Leopold I, Prince of Anhalt-Dessau
Father Rudolf Föhse
Mother Agnes Ohme
Born (1677-03-22)22 March 1677
Dessau
Died 5 February 1745(1745-02-05) (aged 67)
Leopold I and Anna Louise Föhse

Anna Louise Föhse (22 March 1677 in Dessau – 5 February 1745) was the daughter of Rudolf Föhse (1646–1693), the court pharmacist in Dessau, and his wife, Agnes Ohme (died 1707)

Life[edit]

Anna Louise Föhse was the childhood sweetheart and later morganatic wife of Prince Leopold I of Anhalt-Dessau. Despite great resistance on the part of her own father and of her mother-in-law Henriette Catherine, the daughter of Frederick Henry of Orange-Nassau, she married him in 1698 at age 22. After paying 92000Taler to the imperial treasury, she was raised to Imperial Princess by Emperor Leopold I three years later, giving her a higher rank than him.[1]

In the same year 1698, he took up government. Anna Louise and Leopold had ten children together; Leopold also fathered two illegitimate children in 1733 and 1735.

Relations between Anna Louise and her mother-in-law later improved. She also had a good relationship with the Prussian royal family. Her career was the subject of the tabloid press of the day, and of several plays.

Issue[edit]

  1. William Gustav (1699-1737)
  2. Leopold II Maximilian (1700-1751), Leopold's successor and a Prussian Field Marshal
  3. Dietrich (1702-1769), also a Prussian field marshal
  4. Frederick Henry (1705-1781)
  5. Henriette Marie Louise (1707-1707)
  6. Louise (1709-1732), married Victor Frederick, Prince of Anhalt-Bernburg
  7. Maurice (1712-1760), also a Prussian field marshal
  8. Anna Wilhelmine (1715-1780)
  9. Leopoldine Marie (1716-1782) - married to Frederick Henry of Brandenburg-Schwedt (1709-1788)
  10. Henriette Amalie (1720-1793)


This article incorporates information from the equivalent article on the German Wikipedia.

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ Esther Knorr-Anders, Preußische Allgemeine Zeitung, issue. 52/53, 26 December 2009, p. 9