Anna Simms Banks

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Ann B. Simms Banks
Born 1862
Louisville, Kentucky
Died 1923
Winchester, Kentucky
Occupation Suffragist, orator, politician
Spouse(s) William Webb Banks
Parents Isabella and Marcus (or Marquis) Simms

Anna Simms Banks (1862–1923) was an African-American educator and political figure from Winchester, Kentucky. After women gained the right to vote in the United States in 1920, she was a fully credited delegate at the 7th Congressional District Republican Convention in Kentucky, reported to be the first African-American female to hold such a position in the southern part of the United States.[1][2]

Family life[edit]

Banks was born in Louisville, Kentucky. She was married to William Webb Banks, who was politically active about the issue of civil rights for African-Americans.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Negress Is Delegate in Kentucky.". The New York Times. March 4, 1920. Retrieved 30 September 2011. 
  2. ^ "Anna B. Simms Banks". Notable Kentucky African Americans Database. University of Kentucky. Retrieved 30 September 2011. 
  3. ^ "William Webb Banks". Notable Kentucky African Americans Database. University of Kentucky. Retrieved 30 September 2011.