Anna of the Five Towns

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Anna of the Five Towns
Author Arnold Bennett
Country United Kingdom
Language English
Genre Novel
Publisher Chatto & Windus
Publication date
1902
Media type Print (hardcover)
Pages 360pp
ISBN NA
OCLC 7016739

Anna of the Five Towns is a novel by Arnold Bennett, first published in 1902 and one of his best-known works.[1]

Plot summary[edit]

The plot centres on Anna Tellwright, daughter of a wealthy but miserly and dictatorial father, living in the Potteries area of Staffordshire, England. Her activities are strictly controlled by the Methodist church. The novel tells of Anna's struggle for freedom and independence against her father's restraints, and her inward battle between wanting to please her father and wanting to help Willie Price whose father, Titus Price, commits suicide after falling into bankruptcy and debt. During the novel, Anna is courted by the town's most eligible bachelor Henry Mynors, and agrees to be his wife, much to her young sister Agnes' pleasure. She discovers in the end, however, that she loves Willie Price, but does not follow her heart, as he is leaving for Australia, and she is already promised to Mynors. Willie then also commits suicide.

"The Five Towns"[edit]

Stoke-on-Trent has become known as "The Five Towns", because of the name given to it by local novelist Arnold Bennett. In his novels, Bennett used mostly recognisable aliases for five of the six towns (although he called Stoke "Knype"). However, Bennett said that he believed "Five Towns" was more euphonious than "Six Towns", so he omitted Fenton (sometimes referred to as "the forgotten town"). In order from NorthWest to SouthEast, the towns are Tunstall, Burslem, Hanley, Stoke, Fenton and Longton.

References[edit]