Anne Cameron

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Barbara Anne Cameron (born August 20, 1938 in Nanaimo, British Columbia)[1] is a Canadian novelist, poet, screenwriter and short story writer.

Cameron legally changed her name from her birth name, Barbara Cameron, to Cam Hubert and later changed her name from Cam Hubert to Anne Cameron. She has written under these names.[2]

Much of her work is inspired by Northwest Coast First Nations' mythology and culture.

Personal[edit]

An out lesbian,[3] Cameron lives in Tahsis, British Columbia.[1] She has previously lived in Powell River and has spent most of her life on Vancouver Island.

Works[edit]

Film[edit]

  • Ticket to Heaven (1981)
  • Dreamspeaker
  • Drying Up the Streets
  • A Matter of Choice
  • The Tin Flute (adaptation of a novel by Gabrielle Roy)
  • Mistress Madeline
  • Bomb Squad

Fiction[edit]

  • Dreamspeaker (1979)
  • Daughters of Copper Woman (1981)
  • The Journey (1982)
  • Dzelarhons: Mythology of the Northwest Coast (1986)
  • Child of Her People (1987)
  • Stubby Amberchuk & The Holy Grail (1987)
  • Tales of the Cairds (1989)
  • Women, Kids & Huckleberry Wine (1989)
  • South of an Unnamed Creek (1989)
  • Bright's Crossing (1990)
  • Escape to Beulah (1990)
  • Kick the Can (1991)
  • A Whole Brass Band (1992)
  • Wedding Cakes, Rats and Rodeo Queens (1994)
  • DeeJay & Betty (1994)
  • The Whole Fam Damily (1995)
  • Selkie (1996)
  • Aftermath (1999)
  • Those Lancasters (2000)
  • Sarah's Children (2001)
  • Hardscratch Row (2002)
  • Family Resemblances (2003)
  • Dahlia Cassidy (2004)

Poetry[edit]

  • Earth Witch (1983)
  • The Annie Poems (1987)

Children's books[edit]

  • How Raven Freed the Moon (1985)
  • How the Loon Lost her Voice (1985)
  • Raven Returns the Water (1987)
  • Orca's Song (1987)
  • Lazy Boy (1988)
  • Spider Woman (1988)
  • Raven & Snipe (1991)
  • Raven Goes Berrypicking (1991)
  • The Gumboot Geese (1992)
  • T'aal: The One Who Takes Bad Children (1998)
  • "The Most Beautiful Place in the World" (1998)

Awards[edit]

  • 1972 Alberta Poetry Competition
  • 1973 Bliss Carman Award for Poetry, Banff School of Fine Arts
  • 1973 Alberta Poetry Competition
  • 1979 Gibson’s Literary Award
  • 1979 Etrog for best Screenplay - Dreamspeaker

(In 1968, a bronze award statuette was designed by sculptor Sorel Etrog and the award was often referred to as an 'Etrog'. The awards were formally renamed Genie Awards in 1980.)

External links[edit]

References[edit]