Anne Goldthwaite

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Anne Goldthwaite
Anne Goldthwaite, Self-portrait, circa 1906-1913.jpg
Self-portrait, c. 1906-1913, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Born 1869
Montgomery, Alabama
Died 1944 (aged 74–75)
New York
Residence New York
Nationality American
Known for artist of southerners

Anne Goldthwaite (1869–1944) was an American artist and an advocate of women's rights and equal rights.

Biography[edit]

Goldthwaite was born in 1869 in Montgomery, Alabama,[1] the daughter of a captain in the Confederate army. Goldthwaite studied under Walter Shirlaw in New York[2] at the National Academy of Design.[3] She went to Paris in 1907 and immediately joined the artistic crowd after meeting Gertrude Stein.[2] Goldthwaite studied under Charles Guérin.[3] She created many prints there before returning to America just prior to the outbreak of the first World War. In 1913 her work was chosen for exhibition in the Armory Show.[2]

From 1922 until 1944 she taught and took commissions from her residence in New York. Amongst her commissions was Woodrow Wilson. Every summer she would return to Montgomery where she was known for her pictures featuring African Americans,[4] and was considered a "recorder of the South's past."[3]

Works[edit]

  • A Window at Night, oil on canvas, c. 1933, Metropolitan Museum of Art[5]
  • Avenue of the Allies (Fifth Avenue), etching on paper, 1918, Smithsonian American Art Museum[6]
  • Business Section of Boquehomo, etching, not dated, Smithsonian American Art Museum[6]
  • Cabin in Alabama, oil on canvas, c. 1915-1925, Smithsonian American Art Museum[6]
  • Cow and Calf, drypoint, Cleveland Museum of Art[7]
  • East Tenth Street, etching and drypoint, Cleveland Museum of Art[7]
  • Garden Gate, Near Ascain #7, oil on canvas, 1912, Metropolitan Museum[5]
  • Grazing, watercolor and black chalk on paper, Metropolitan Museum of Art[5]
  • Head of a Negress, Rachel, glazed terracotta sculpture, c. 1929, Metropolitan Museum of Art[5]
  • Her Daughter, (mother bathing her child), lithograph, not dated, Smithsonian American Art Museum[6]
  • Horse and Rider, lithograph, not dated, Smithsonian American Art Museum[6]
  • Mending III, lithograph, not dated, Smithsonian American Art Museum[6]
  • Negro Woman at a Fountain, etching, not dated, Smithsonian American Art Museum[6]
  • New Year's Night - Cafe Versaille, etching, not dated, Smithsonian American Art Museum[6]
  • New York Harbor, etching, Cleveland Museum of Art[7]
  • Night Series: Dog Baying at the Moon, lithograph, Cleveland Museum of Art[7]
  • Nude Reading, lithograph, not dated, Smithsonian American Art Museum[6][7]
  • Pool Room, lithograph, not dated, Smithsonian American Art Museum[6][7]
  • Polo I, etching, Cleveland Museum of Art[7]
  • Portrait of a Young Man, oil on canvas, 1913, Smithsonian American Art Museum[6]
  • Sarah Eakin Cowan (1873–1958), watercolor on ivory, 1935, Metropolitan Museum of Art[5]
  • Saturday, etching, not dated, Smithsonian American Art Museum[6]
  • Self-Portrait, oil on wood mounted on fiber, c. 1906-1913, Smithsonian American Art Museum[6]
  • Selma, lithograph, Cleveland Museum of Art[7]
  • Southern Street, watercolor and graphite on paper, Metropolitan Museum of Art[5]
  • Street Fiddler, lithograph, not dated, Smithsonian American Art Museum[6]
  • The Green Sofa, oil on canvas, c. 1930-1940, Metropolitan Museum of Art[5]
  • The Jaehne House, East 10th Street, New York, etching, Cleveland Museum of Art[7]
  • Tulips, Cleveland Museum of Art[7]
  • Two Black Crows, lithograph, not dated, Smithsonian American Art Museum[6][7]
  • Untitled, (child on a donkey or mule), lithograph, not dated, Smithsonian American Art Museum[6]
  • Untitled, (Ironing), lithograph, not dated, Smithsonian American Art Museum[6]
  • Young Woman in White, oil on canvas, c. 1930s, Cleveland Museum of Art[7]
  • White Mules on a Bridge, oil on canvas, c. 1930-1940, Metropolitan Museum of Art[5]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Anne Goldthwaite". Smithsonian. Retrieved 26 October 2010. 
  2. ^ a b c 1913 Armory Show 50th Anniversary Exhibition 1963 copyright and organized by Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute, copyright and sponsored by the Henry Street Settlement, New York City, Library of Congress card number 63-13993
  3. ^ a b c Anne Goldthwaite. Biography. Smithsonian Institution. Retrieved May 28, 2014.
  4. ^ "Printmakers of Alabama". Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts. Archived from the original on 26 November 2010. Retrieved 26 October 2010. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h Search: Goldthwaite. Collection online. Metropolitan Museum of Art. Retrieved May 26, 2014.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q Search: Anne Goldthwaite. Smithsonian American Art Museum. Retrieved May 26, 2014.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Artists: Anne Goldthwaite. Cleveland Museum of Art. Retrieved May 26, 2014.

External links[edit]