Anne Keothavong

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Anne Keothavong
Anne Keothavong 8.jpg
Country United Kingdom United Kingdom
Residence South West, London, UK
Born (1983-09-16) 16 September 1983 (age 31)
Hackney, London, UK
Height 1.75 m (5 ft 9 in)
Turned pro 2001
Retired 2013
Plays Right-handed (two-handed backhand)
Prize money US$1,257,965
Singles
Career record 418–312
Career titles 0 WTA (20 ITF)
Highest ranking No. 48 (23 February 2009)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open 2R (2011)
French Open 1R (2009, 2010, 2011, 2012)
Wimbledon 2R (2004, 2008, 2011, 2012)
US Open 3R (2008)
Other tournaments
Olympic Games 1R (2012)
Doubles
Career record 106–157
Career titles 0 WTA (8 ITF)
Highest ranking No. 94 (18 April 2011)
Grand Slam Doubles results
Australian Open 2R (2009)
French Open 1R (2009)
Wimbledon 2R (2008)
US Open 1R (2008)
Mixed Doubles
Career titles 0
Grand Slam Mixed Doubles results
Australian Open
French Open
Wimbledon 2R (2008)
US Open
Last updated on: 26 May 2014.

Anne Viensouk Keothavong (born 16 September 1983) is a retired Laotian-British tennis player. She announced her retirement on 24 July 2013 [1] During her career she won a total of 20 International Tennis Federation singles titles, 8 ITF doubles titles and reached a career-high singles ranking of world No. 48 (achieved 23 February 2009).[2] She also reached the semifinals of six International tournaments on the main tour and the semifinals of one Premier tournament.[3]

Anne was British Number 1 at the WTA year-end rankings 5 times and in 2009 became the first British player to make the WTA top 50 since 1993. In April 2001, at the age of 17 years old she became (and remains to this day) the youngest player ever to play Fed Cup for Great Britain, making her debut at the age of 17 and she is second (with Elena Baltacha) to Virginia Wade for most Fed Cup ties played for Great Britain with 39.

Since retiring, Anne is now a member of BT Sport's tennis coverage team alongside Martina Navratilova and fellow ex-number one Sam Smith.

Personal life[edit]

Anne's brother, James, umpiring at Roland Garros

Anne Keothavong was born in Hackney in London, to parents who had fled from their wartorn home country of Laos in the 1970s.[4] Her father, Somsak, encouraged her to play short tennis from an early age.[5] Her mother's name is Vathana and she has two brothers: James, who is a tennis umpire,[6] and Mark and a sister, Lena.

At the age of seven, Keothavong took up tennis at Hackney Downs and Highbury Fields.[7][8] Her preferred surface is hard, though she has also enjoyed success on clay, carpet and grass.

Career[edit]

Junior (1996–2001)[edit]

Keothavong played her first match on the junior ITF tour in February 1996, at age 12, and her last in August 2001. In singles she won one title at the LTA Junior International Tournament – Bisham Abbey where she beat compatriot Elena Baltacha in the final. She also reached a total of three semifinals (one of which was at the 2001 Wimbledon girls' tournament where she was beaten by Dinara Safina,[9] the future world no.1, who like Anne, went on to reach a higher ranking in seniors than in juniors) and ten quarterfinals.

In junior doubles she won one tournament, the 13th Salik Open and lost in the final of two others: the LTA International Junior Tournament – Bisham Abbey and the 11th Malaysian International Junior Championships. All three of these were in 1999 and all three were partnering Elena Baltacha.

1998–2001[edit]

Keothavong played her first professional match on the ITF circuit in April 1998, at age 14, when she fell in the first round of qualifying for the $10,000 tournament in Birmingham. That year she played only two more matches (in the qualifying tournaments for the $10,000 ITF events in Hatfield and Felixstowe) and lost both of them. She finished the year without a world ranking.[10]

During May 1999, Keothavong played in a total of five ITF tournaments with her best result being in the $10,000 event in Sunderland where she won three matches to qualify and then reached the second round. In the other four events, she either lost in the first round or qualifying stages. Her final ranking of the year was world No.702.[10]

In 2000, Keothavong played ten ITF tournaments, losing in the qualifying stages in one, round one in three others, the second round four times (once as a lucky loser) and the quarterfinal in the $50,000 tournament in Cardiff. The other tournament she entered was the qualifying event for Wimbledon in which she participated courtesy of a wild card. She beat Eva Martincova in round one of qualifying before losing to Yuka Yoshida. She improved her ranking to world No. 377.[10]

2001 started well for Keothavong; in her first tournament of the year she won the title by beating compatriot Emily Webley-Smith in the quarterfinals and Elodie Le Bescond in the final. She then reached the quarterfinals of her next tournament, the $10,000 event in Tipton. In February she reached the semifinals in Sutton ($25,000) as a qualifier. She played in the Fed Cup for the first time in April and lost all three of her singles rubbers in straight sets. In June she was given wild cards into the qualifying draws for the DFS Classic (where she was beaten in the first round of qualifying) and the Britannic Asset Management International Championships (where she reached the second round of qualifying) and the main draw of Wimbledon. She faced Janet Lee in round one and lost. In September and October she reached three ITF quarterfinals (one $50,000, one $25,000 and one $10,000) and one semifinal ($25,000). Her world ranking at the end of 2001 was world No. 268.[10]

2002[edit]

Keothavong's 2002 season started slowly; she played in thirteen ITF tournaments and did not pass the second round in any. In June, she was given a wild card into the qualifying draw for the DFS Classic where she lost in round one. She also attempted to qualify for the Britannic Asset Management International Championships and was again beaten in the first round. She next competed in the main draw of Wimbledon where in the first round, she lost to Virginie Razzano.[11] Immediately after Wimbledon she headed to Felixstowe to participate in a $25,000 ITF tournament where she reached the quarterfinals. In August and September, she reached four consecutive ITF finals, winning three. She won the first in Bath beating Hannah Collin in the final. She was victorious in London when she defeated Yvonne Doyle but lost in the third final in Glasgow to Selima Sfar. In Sunderland, her fourth consecutive final of August and September, she won by again beating Hannah Collin. She competed in three more $25,000 ITF tournaments that year and reached the semifinals in two of them. Her final ranking of 2002 was world No.233.[10]

2003[edit]

The first tournament of 2003 for Keothavong was the qualifying event for the Moorilla Hobart International where she lost to Tiffany Dabek in the first round. Keothavong then headed to the Australian Open in order to attempt to qualify and she again lost in the first round to Sandra Klösel. After this she headed to the ITF circuit and won the $25,000 event in Belfort by defeating Nathalie Viérin in the final. Two weeks later she reached the quarterfinals of a $25,000 ITF in Redbridge and the week after that lost in the final of yet another $25,000 ITF in Ostrava. In March she reached the quarterfinals of Redding ($25,000) and in April she headed to Portugal to represent Great Britain in the Fed Cup. She won two of her four singles rubbers. May saw Keothavong reach the second round of qualifying for the French Open. In her next tournament (Surbiton $25,000) she reached the semifinals but had to withdraw before the match. Keothavong did not compete again until mid-June when she was given a wild card into the main draw of the Hastings Direct International where she was defeated by Japanese veteran, Ai Sugiyama. A second consecutive wild card gave her entry into the main draw of Wimbledon where she had to withdraw during her first round match against Katarina Srebotnik with the score at 2–6 0–4. After Wimbledon she reached the final round of qualifying for the US Open and lost to Maureen Drake but had no more notable results that year. She finished the year with a singles ranking of world No. 177.[10]

2004[edit]

2004 began well for Keothavong as she started off by qualifying for the tier V, Moorilla Hobart International, beating Kaia Kanepi along the way. In the first round she faced world No.69, Rita Grande, from Italy but was beaten. This was followed by an attempt to qualify for the first Grand Slam of the season, the Australian Open. She was beaten in the first round of qualifying by Stephanie Gehrlein. In February she reached the quarterfinals of ITF events in Sunderland ($25,000) and St Paul ($50,000), beaten by Lisa Stanciute and Jill Craybas respectively. The next month she won the sixth ITF title of her career by beating Mashona Washington in the final of the $25,000 event in Redding. In late April and early May, she represented Britain in the Fed Cup and won all three of her singles rubbers, but lost her one and only doubles match with partner, Elena Baltacha, before going on to lose in the first round of qualifying for the French Open to Květa Peschke. In the run up to Wimbledon, Keothavong was given a wild card into the main draw of the DFS Classic where in the first round she faced, world No.60, Marta Marrero, who she managed to beat in three sets. Keothavong came up against world No.56, María Sánchez Lorenzo (the 16th seed) in the second round and lost in three sets. She headed to the main draw of the Hastings International Direct, a tier II event after whis and faced No.8 seed, Magdalena Maleeva and was again beaten in three sets. A wild card granted Keothavong entry to the main draw of Wimbledon for the fourth consecutive year where she won her first round match, beating Nicole Pratt, the world No.41, in a performance assisted by a rain delay when Keothavong was 3–1 down in the first set.[12] The eventual champion, Maria Sharapova, beat her in the second round.[13] After Wimbledon, Keothavong played in two $50,000 ITF event in the United States reaching the second round in one and the quarterfinals in the second, in Lexington where she had to withdraw due to sustaining serious ligament damage[14] with the score at 5–7 3–5. She did not play again that year and finished the year with a ranking of world No. 175.[10]

2005[edit]

Keothavong recovered well from her injury and returned to action ahead of schedule in March at the $10,000 ITF tournament in Sunderland where she suffered a three set, first round defeat by Verdiana Verardi. She then immediately reached three successive $10,000 ITF finals; the first in Bolton and the second two in Bath. She won the first two by beating Veronika Chvojkova and Claire Peterzan respectively and lost the third to compatriot, Melanie South. The first of the two tournaments in Bath was also the only time Keothavong competed with her sister, Lena, in doubles on the ITF tour. They reached the quarterfinals together. In late April, Keothavong competed in the Fed Cup and helped Britain avoid relegation from the Africa/Europe Zone Group I by beating Caroline Wozniacki to help Britain beat Denmark. This meant that although they lost ties against Serbia and Montenegro and Slovenia, they avoided a place in the relegation play-offs for another year.[15] In May she reached the semifinals of a $25,000 ITF event in Monzón where she lost to Angelique Kerber. She was then given a wild card into the main draw of the DFS Classic where she lost to Laura Granville in the first round. This was followed by a wild card into the Hastings Direct International qualifying tournament where Arantxa Parra Santonja defeated her in the first round. After this, another wild card allowed Keothavong entry into the main draw of the Wimbledon Championships where she faced Mariana Díaz-Oliva in the first round and lost in straight sets.

After Wimbledon, Keothavong competed on the ITF circuit for the rest of the year (except when she reached the second round of the tier III event, the Bell Challenge, where she lost to Sofia Arvidsson) and won two more titles. The first was in Nottingham, a $10,000 event, where she beat Karen Paterson in a three set final and the second was a $25,000 tournament in Lagos where she defeated Maša Zec Peškirič to win the title. She also reached one more $25,000 ITF final this year, also in Lagos, where she lost to Petra Cetkovská in three sets. Her year-end ranking for 2005 was world No. 239.[10]

2006[edit]

Keothavong started her 2006 season by losing in the first round of qualifying for the Brisbane International (tier III), the final round of qualifying for the Moorilla Hobart International (tier IV) and the second round of qualifying for the Australian Open. In February, Keothavong returned to Britain and reached the final of the ITF tournament in Jersey where she beat Ana Vrljić to win the title. She then entered the $25,000 ITF tournament in Sunderland where she beat four compatriots; Melanie South, Rebecca Llewellyn, Sarah Coles and Katie O'Brien in straight sets to reach the final where she was beaten by Elise Tamaëla. Later in February, Keothavong reached the quarterfinals of an ITF tournament in Orange ($25,000) and one month later, in March, she reached another ITF final, again $25,000. In April she reached the semifinals of the $25,000 ITF event in Patras and competed for Great Britain in the Fed Cup where she won one of her three singles rubbers. She qualified for the Internationaux de Strasbourg, a tier III tournament, where she lost to Anna Smashnova in the first round.

Keothavong competed in four tournaments in June: a $25,000 event in Surbiton, the DFS Classic, the Hastings Direct Championships and Wimbledon. She was beaten by Laura Granville in the semifinals, Eleni Daniilidou in round one, Vera Dushevina in the first round and Karolina Šprem in the first round respectively. During her American hard court season, she reached the quarterfinals of a $50,000 ITF tournament in Lexington where she fell to Camille Pin of France. In August, Keothavong lost in the first round of qualifying for the US Open and followed this up with three consecutive first round losses in WTA events. She then returned to the ITF circuit playing $25,000 tournaments and won one more title, in Přerov. She also reached two semifinals (Glasgow and Opole) and a quarterfinal in Jersey. She ended the season with her world ranking at No. 168.[10]

2007[edit]

The 2007 season began in the same way as the 2006 for Keothavong; she again started her year by falling in qualifying for the WTA events in the Moorilla Hobart International and the Australian Open. In February she reached two consecutive ITF semifinals in Tipton ($25,000) and St. Paul ($50,000) before going on to lose in qualifying for the Cellular South Cup and in qualifying for Indian Wells in March. Keothavong again represented her country in the Fed Cup in April and won one of her three singles matches. In May she reached the semifinals of an ITF $25,000 in Antalya and lost in the second round of the French Open qualifying tournament to María Emilia Salerni. As in 2006, June saw Keothavong lose in the first round of the DFS Classic, the Hastings Direct International and Wimbledon after she was given a wild card into each of these events. Elena Baltacha was her conqueror in the Hastings Direct whereas Jelena Janković was the victor over Keothavong in Wimbledon.

After Wimbledon Keothavong reached two consecutive finals of $50,000 ITFs in Lexington and Vancouver, facing Stéphanie Dubois in the finals of both and winning once. Following this she lost in qualifying for the Rogers Cup, the US Open and Bali before going on to reach her first ever WTA Tour semifinal in the Sunfeast Open, a tier III tournament held in Kolkata. She did this by defeating Sara Errani[16] in the first round, Sunitha Rao in round two[17] and Tzipi Obziler in the quarterfinals.[18] She lost to Mariya Koryttseva in the semifinals. In October she reached the quarterfinals of the $25,000 ITF in Rockhampton and her year-ending singles ranking was world No. 122.[10]

2008[edit]

Keothavong's 2008 campaign began when Keothavong failed to qualify for the tier II tournament, the Medibank International. She then attempted to qualify for the Australian Open and won her first match against Jorgelina Cravero[19] before losing her second to Monica Niculescu.[20] February saw her join compatriots, Melanie South, Katie O'Brien and Elena Baltacha, to represent Britain in the Fed Cup. Despite Keothavong winning each of her three singles matches in the round robin stage, Britain was forced to fight relegation from the Europe/Africa Group I by playing Portugal. They won 2–0 thanks to yet another victory in singles from Keothavong and a singles victory from O'Brien.[21] For the remainder of February, Keothavong competed on the ITF circuit and reached the quarterfinals of a $25,000 event in Stockholm and won a $25,000 title in Capriolo. In early April she lost in the final of a $50,000 ITF; this one in Patras where Magdaléna Rybáriková defeated her in straight sets. Continuing competition on the ITF tour, she won a $50,000 ITF in Jounieh, Lebanon, despite break outs of fighting between Shia and Hezbollah militia less than ten miles away in Beirut. This tournament win propelled Keothavong into the top 100 for the first time in her career and guaranteed her a place in the main draw of Wimbledon for the first time in her career; the first time a British woman had entered Wimbledon on merit since 1999.[22] She then fell in the first round of qualifying for the French Open before reaching another $50,000 ITF final (in Surbiton).

In the run up to Wimbledon, Keothavong lost in the first round of the DFS Classic to Kateryna Bondarenko and in the first round of the Ordina Open to Sara Errani. In her first round match in Wimbledon, she faced American, Vania King, and lost the first set. She regrouped during a toilet break at the end of the first set and came back to win the match in three sets despite being 2–0 down in the deciding set.[23] She then lost to the eventual champion, Venus Williams, in the second round.[24] After Wimbledon Keothavong made a successful start to her American hard court season by winning three matches to qualify for the tier II event in Stanford. She then defeated Sania Mirza in the first round before giving Marion Bartoli a tough time in round two in a match which she eventually lost in three tight sets. In August she entered the US Open for the first time in her career and faced Alexa Glatch in round one. She won the match[25] and then went on to beat Francesca Schiavone in the second round in three sets.[26] However No.5 seed, Elena Dementieva, proved to much for Keothavong in the third round; Keothavong lost.[27] After the US Open, Keothavong won two more ITF events: Barnstaple ($50,000) and Kraków ($100,000) and as a result, her year end ranking was world No.61.[10]

2009[edit]

Keothavong began her 2009 season by launching her official website, www.annekeothavong.co.uk, before heading to the ASB Classic where she reached the semifinals. En route she defeated Mirjana Lučić, No.8 seed Carla Suárez Navarro and Ayumi Morita before falling in a three hour, three set battle to Elena Vesnina.[28] This was only the second time in her career that she reached the semifinals of a WTA Tour event. Keothavong then competed in the Moorilla Hobart International where she faced a tough draw in round one against world No.25, Ágnes Szávay. Nevertheless Keothavong came through without too much difficulty, beating Szávay in two sets.[29] She lost to Virginie Razzano in the second round. Keothavong then headed to the main draw of the Australian Open for the first time in her career where she came up against Anna Chakvetadze, who was the 17th seed. She lost in a controversial match where a mistake by the umpire allowed Chakvetadze to serve first in the final set, an advantage which should have gone to Keothavong.[30] Keothavong was the fourth seed in her next tournament, the Cellular South Cup, and she followed up on this seeding by reaching the semifinals of a WTA event for the second time in 2009. She defeated Maria Elena Camerin, Michelle Larcher de Brito and No.5 seed Marina Erakovic on the way to being demolished by top seed Caroline Wozniacki in the semifinals.[31] Despite this crushing defeat, a semifinal run was enough to help Keothavong make the hop from world No.52 to world No.48, her debut in the top 50.[32] Keothavong then endured three consecutive first round defeats in the BNP Paribas Open,[33] the Sony Ericsson Open[34] (both Premier Mandatory tournaments) and a $100,000 ITF tournament in Tourhout, Belgium, where she was forced to retire due to a viral illness.[35]

Following this, Keothavong began her clay court season by defeating Maret Ani to reach the second round of the Grand Prix SAR La Princesse Lalla Meryem[36] where she was defeated by Lourdes Domínguez Lino. This was followed by another first round defeat in a Premier event in the Internazionali BNL d'Italia, this one at the hands of Carla Suárez Navarro. In the Mutua Madrileña Madrid Open she beat Mariana Duque Marino in round one[37] before losing to Lucie Šafářová in the second round. In her very next tournament she reached the fourth WTA Tour semifinal of her career and her third in 2009 in the Warsaw Open. She faced No.7 seed, Bethanie Mattek-Sands, in round one, American veteran Jill Craybas in the second round, qualifier Ioana Raluca Olaru in the quarterfinals and was beaten by 8th seed Alona Bondarenko in the semifinals. Nevertheless, in reaching the semifinals she became the first British woman to reach the semifinals of a WTA clay court event since Jo Durie reached the semis of the 1983 French Open, 26 years before.[3] She then came up against reigning World No.1, Dinara Safina, in the first round of the French Open and endured the dreaded "double bagel" when she was defeated, 0–6 0–6.[38] Keothavong began her grass court season on home turf with a victory over Sofia Arvidsson in the first round of the Aegon Classic before losing to eventual semifinalist, Sania Mirza, in round two.[39] She was then defeated in the first round of the Aegon International by world No.28, Sybille Bammer, but saw off a mugger in central London who tried to snatch her handbag[40] before heading to Wimbledon, where she experienced a first round loss to world No.80, Patricia Mayr.[41]

After this, Keothavong played the Bank of the West Classic in Stanford, California, where she lost in the opening round of the singles to Elena Dementieva. Keothavong also played in the doubles with Ayumi Morita against Julie Coin and Marie-Ève Pelletier, trailing 4–6 5–3 when she attempted to run down a drop shot and, in trying to avoid a collision with the net post, suffered a serious knee injury, rupturing her left anterior cruciate ligament and meniscus, a similar injury to the one she suffered in 2004 in her right knee. This injury ended Keothavong's year and as a result, her year-end ranking dropped to world No.84.[10]

2010[edit]

After six months out of action due to her knee injury, Keothavong returned to competitive action in February 2010 at the Fed Cup. She faced Patricia Mayr of Austria in her first match back and was beaten in straight sets. She partnered Sarah Borwell to take on Mayr and Yvonne Meusburger in the doubles and again lost in straight sets. However Keothavong did manage to claim victory in her other two singles ties against players from Belarus and the Netherlands.

Keothavong then returned to the tour at the Dow Corning Tennis Classic in Michigan, USA in the 100k event. Keothavong battled past Croatia's Ivana Lisjak in 3 sets before only dropping 2 games in a drubbing of Daniilidou of Greece. She then faced Marta Domachowska of Poland and went down in 3 sets after she won the first.

At the Cellular South Cup in Memphis, Keothavong reached the semi finals, on her return to the main tour. By defeating Kristina Barrois, Michelle Larcher de Brito, and Karolina Šprem in 3 impressive wins, all in straight sets. She then fell in three sets to Sofia Arvidsson in the semifinals, after battling back from a set down lost she lost the decider.

Keothavong then competed in 2 Premier tournaments, the BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells and Sony Ericsson Open in Miami. Keothavong crashed out in R1 in both tournaments. To Anna Chakvetadze of Russia in 3 sets after winning the first to continue her losing record against her in Indian Wells. And in sad circumstances in Miami as she lost in straight sets to Tamira Paszek and said afterwards "Frankly tennis didn’t seem that important today"[42] after receiving news before the match that her grandmother had died.

Less than a week after her loss in Miami, Keothavong bounced back in a 75K event in Monzón, Spain. She reached the quarter finals after beating two Asian players, Yurika Sema of Japan in straight sets and Thailand's Tamarine Tanasugarn in 3 after losing a tight first set. She bowed out to Maria Elena Camerin of Italy in straight sets.

Keothavong then moved on to Torhout, Belgium for a 50K event. She made it to the semifinals after taking out Shapatava of Georgia, Ukraine's Kristina Antoniychuk and Canada's Valérie Tétreault in straight sets. In the semi she faced another Canadian, Rebecca Marino, Keothavong lost.

At Wimbledon she was defeated in the first round by Anastasia Rodionova.

Keothavong entered the 2010 Luxembourg Open using a protected ranking and reached the semifinals after beating Virginie Razzano Patty Schnyder and Iveta Benešová but was beaten by Roberta Vinci, preventing Keothavong from making her first WTA tour final.

2011[edit]

At the beginning of the year in Australia, Keothavong reached the second round of the 2011 ASB Classic in Auckland losing to Kateryna Bondarenko 5–7, 3–6 and the second round of the 2011 Australian Open, where she qualified, losing to 30th seed Andrea Petkovic 6–2, 5–7, 0–6.

Keothavong then played several ITF Circuit events with limited success. She then entered the second Grand Slam event of the year, the 2011 French Open, but lost a closely fought match in the first round to Vesna Dolonts 6–3, 6–7(5), 4–6.

Keothavong then moved onto grass in her home country and won a round at the $100,000 ITF event in Nottingham before losing to Stéphanie Dubois. At Eastbourne, Keothavong entered the qualifying round, defeating 8th seed Alizé Cornet 6–4, 6–2 and Sorana Cîrstea 6–3, 6–3 before losing in the final round to Mirjana Lučić 5–7, 1–6. At the 2011 Wimbledon Championships, Keothavong defeated fellow Briton Naomi Broady in the first round 6–2, 6–4 before losing in the second round to No.8 seed and eventual champion Petra Kvitová.

Keothavong had little success during the US hard court series, but the majority of her successes for 2011 came during the European hard court series towards the end of the year. Keothavong qualified and reached the second round of the 2011 Generali Ladies Linz, losing a close match to No.3 seed Jelena Janković 6–3, 2–6, 1–6. Keothavong then qualified again and this time reached the semi-finals of the 2011 BGL Luxembourg Open, defeating Ana Ivanovic 6–3, 6–2 along the way before losing a close match to Monica Niculescu 5–7, 6–4, 3–6.

Keothavong then won back-to-back ITF events. She won the $75,000 event in Barnstaple, defeating Marta Domachowska in the final 6–1, 6–3 and she also won the doubles event with Eva Birnerová. She then won the singles title in the $50,000 event in Ismaning, defeating Yvonne Meusburger in the final 6–3, 1–6, 6–2 and again winning the doubles title as well, this time with Kiki Bertens.

2012[edit]

Keothavong played her first event of the 2012 season at the 2012 ASB Classic in Auckland where she is the top seed in the qualifying tournament. She defeated Australian wildcard Emily Fanning 6–3, 6–4 in the first round, and followed this with a 6–3, 6–3 victory over Varvara Lepchenko of USA. In the third round Keothavong lost 6–1, 6–4 to Jamie Hampton of USA.

Keothavong went straight into the main draw at the 2012 Australian Open, but had to retire due to illness from her first round match after losing the first set to Mona Barthel.

Keothavong was selected for the GB Federation Cup Team to play in the Europe/Africa Group 1 match at Eilat, Israel on 1–4 February 2012. In the group stages she played singles, defeating opponents from Portugal,[43] and Israel in the group stages but losing to the Netherlands.[44] The team qualified for a play-off against Austria in which Keothavong beat Patricia Mayr-Achleitner 7–6 6–3 and Great Britain won 2–0 to secure a place in the World Group II play-off to be held in April 2012.[45]

Keothavong lost in straight sets in the first round of the 2012 French Open. [46]

In Wimbledon 2012, Keothavong lost her second round match against Sara Errani, 1–6, 1–6.[47]

2013[edit]

Keothavong made a disappointing start to 2013, losing in the first round qualifier in the Australian Open, losing to Grace Min. Despite this, she was still named in the Great Britain Fed Cup team alongside Laura Robson, Heather Watson and Johanna Konta to face Portugal, Hungary and Bosnia.[48] Keothavong made reached her first WTA final when she and doubles partner Valeria Savinykh surprisingly reached the doubles final of the Brasil Tennis Cup. They were finally beaten by top seeds Anabel Medina Garrigues and Yaroslava Shvedova, 0–6, 4–6. She played her final match of her career at the 2013 Wimbledon Championships. She lost in the first round to Spanish teenager Garbine Muguruza by the scoreline of 4-6 0-6.

Retirement[edit]

On 24 July, she announced her retirement from professional tennis. The 29-year-old, who reached a career-high ranking of 48 four years ago, is joining BT Sport as part of their team to cover the WTA Tour. Keothavong says: "I have given my decision a lot of thought and I believe this is the right time to move on to the next stage of my career."

Playing style[edit]

Keothavong's greatest strength is her powerful forehand which she uses to try to dominate play from the baseline and she adds as much topspin as possible to increase the probability of the ball landing in court.[49] As well as her forehand, she can rely on her first-serve to get her some easy points as she often has a high first-serve percentage and usually wins the majority of points on her first-serve. She rarely has a match where she serves no aces at all, and in her second round match at the 2008 US Open she served a total of seven aces.[50][51][52][53][54][55]

WTA career finals[edit]

Doubles (0–1)[edit]

Legend
Grand Slam tournaments (0/0)
WTA Tour Championships (0/0)
Premier Mandatory & Premier 5 (0/0)
Premier (0/0)
International (0/1)
Finals by surface
Hard (0/1)
Clay (0/0)
Grass (0/0)
Carpet (0/0)
Result Date Category Tournament Surface Partnering Opponent Score
Runner-up 2 March 2013 International Florianópolis, Brasil Hard Russia Valeria Savinykh Spain Anabel Medina Garrigues
Kazakhstan Yaroslava Shvedova
0–6, 4–6

ITF career finals[edit]

Singles (20–10)[edit]

Finals by category
$100,000 tournaments (1/0)
$75,000 tournaments (1/0)
$50,000 tournaments (5/3)
$25,000 tournaments (6/6)
$10,000 tournaments (7/1)
Finals by surface
Hard (16/9)
Clay (1/0)
Grass (0/1)
Carpet (3/0)
Result Date Category Tournament Surface Opponent Score
Winner 22 January 2001 ITF $10,000 Jersey, Great Britain Hard (i) France Elodie LeBescond 6–3, 6–2
Winner 5 August 2002 ITF $10,000 Bath, Great Britain Hard United Kingdom Hannah Collin 6–0, 7–6(7–5)
Winner 12 August 2002 ITF $10,000 London, Great Britain Hard Republic of Ireland Yvonne Doyle 6–4, 7–6(7–1)
Runner-up 16 September 2002 ITF $25,000 Glasgow, Great Britain Hard (i) Tunisia Sfar, SelimaSelima Sfar 6–7(5–7), 6–2, 6–7(8–10)
Winner 23 September 2002 ITF $10,000 Sunderland, Great Britain Hard (i) United Kingdom Hannah Collin 6–0, 6–1
Winner 27 January 2003 ITF $25,000 Belfort, France Hard (i) France Viérin, NathalieNathalie Viérin 5–7, 7–6(7–3), 6–4
Runner-up 24 February 2003 ITF $25,000 Ostrava, Czech Republic Hard (i) Czech Republic Ondrášková, ZuzanaZuzana Ondrášková 4–6, 6–7(1–7)
Winner 22 March 2004 ITF $25,000 Redding, California, United States Hard United States Washington, MashonaMashona Washington 6–3, 2–6, 7–6(7–3)
Winner 16 March 2005 ITF $10,000 Bolton, Great Britain Hard (i) Czech Republic Veronika Chvojkova 3–6, 6–1, 6–1
Winner 30 March 2005 ITF $10,000 Bath, Great Britain Hard (i) United Kingdom Clare Peterzan 6–1, 6–1
Runner-up 6 April 2005 ITF $10,000 Bath, Great Britain Hard (i) United Kingdom South, MelanieMelanie South 4–6, 6–4, 4–6
Winner 30 August 2005 ITF $10,000 Nottingham, Great Britain Hard United Kingdom Paterson, KarenKaren Paterson 1–6, 7–6(7–4), 6–4
Runner-up 10 October 2005 ITF $25,000 Lagos, Nigeria Hard Czech Republic Cetkovská, PetraPetra Cetkovská 6–3, 3–6, 2–6
Winner 17 October 2005 ITF $25,000 Lagos, Nigeria Hard Slovenia Zec Peškirič, MašaMaša Zec Peškirič 6–3, 7–6(9–7)
Winner 1 February 2006 ITF $25,000 Jersey, Great Britain Hard (i) Croatia Vrljić, AnaAna Vrljić 6–2, 6–1
Runner-up 8 February 2006 ITF $25,000 Sunderland, Great Britain Hard (i) Netherlands Tamaela, EliseElise Tamaela 6–7(6–8), 3–6
Runner-up 21 March 2006 ITF $25,000 Redding, California, United States Hard United States Diana Ospina 3–6, 6–3, 1–6
Winner 15 November 2006 ITF $25,000 Přerov, Czech Republic Carpet (i) Germany Kerber, AngeliqueAngelique Kerber 6–4, 7–5
Runner-up 24 July 2007 ITF $50,000 Lexington, Kentucky, United States Hard Canada Dubois, StéphanieStéphanie Dubois 6–4, 3–6, 3–6
Winner 31 July 2007 ITF $50,000 Vancouver, Canada Hard Canada Dubois, StéphanieStéphanie Dubois 7–5, 6–1
Winner 18 February 2008 ITF $25,000 Capriolo, Italy Carpet (i) Russia Manasieva, VesnaVesna Manasieva 6–1, 2–6, 6–3
Runner-up 31 March 2008 ITF $50,000 Patras, Greece Hard Slovakia Rybáriková, MagdalénaMagdaléna Rybáriková 3–6, 5–7
Winner 5 May 2008 ITF $50,000 Jounieh, Lebanon Clay Spain Dominguez Lino, LourdesLourdes Dominguez Lino 6–4, 6–1
Runner-up 2 June 2008 ITF $50,000 Surbiton, Great Britain Grass New Zealand Erakovic, MarinaMarina Erakovic 4–6, 2–6
Winner 7 October 2008 ITF $50,000 Barnstaple, Great Britain Hard (i) Italy Brianti, AlbertaAlberta Brianti 6–4, 6–2
Winner 3 November 2008 ITF $100,000 Kraków, Poland Hard (i) Romania Niculescu, MonicaMonica Niculescu 7–6(7–4), 4–6, 6–3
Runner-up 10 September 2010 ITF $25,000 Tallinn, Estonia Hard Russia Bovina, ElenaElena Bovina 4–6, 1–4 ret.
Winner 29 October 2011 ITF $75,000 Barnstaple, Great Britain Hard (i) Poland Domachowska, MartaMarta Domachowska 6–1, 6–3
Winner 6 November 2011 ITF $50,000 Ismaning, Germany Carpet Austria Meusburger, YvonneYvonne Meusburger 6–3, 1–6, 6–2
Winner 30 March 2013 ITF $50,000 Crossy-Beaubourg, France Hard Czech Republic Záhlavová, SandraSandra Záhlavová 7–6(3), 6–3

Doubles (8–2)[edit]

Finals by category
$100,000 tournaments (0/0)
$75,000 tournaments (1/0)
$50,000 tournaments (2/0)
$25,000 tournaments (4/2)
$10,000 tournaments (1/0)
Finals by surface
Hard (6/2)
Clay (1/0)
Grass (0/0)
Carpet (1/0)
Result Date Category Tournament Surface Partnering Opponent Score
Winner 15 May 2005 ITF $25,000 Tenerife, Spain Hard United Kingdom Amanda Janes Germany Babilon, JuliaJulia Babilon
Germany Barna, AdrianaAdriana Barna
7–6(7–5), 3–6, 6–3
Winner 1 September 2005 ITF $10,000 Nottingham, Great Britain Hard United Kingdom Clare Peterzan United Kingdom Lindsay Cox
United Kingdom Rebecca Fong
6–1, 6–1
Runner-up 22 September 2005 ITF $25,000 Glasgow, Great Britain Hard (i) United Kingdom Paterson, KarenKaren Paterson United Kingdom Baltacha, ElenaElena Baltacha
Estonia Rüütel, MargitMargit Rüütel
3–6, 7–6(7–2), 2–6
Runner-up 14 February 2006 ITF $25,000 Stockholm, Sweden Hard (i) South Africa Surina De Beer Switzerland Bacsinszky, TimeaTimea Bacsinszky
France Védy, AurélieAurélie Védy
4–6, 4–6
Winner 31 January 2007 ITF $25,000 United Kingdom London, Great Britain Hard (i) United Kingdom Curran, ClaireClaire Curran Czech Republic Hlaváčková, AndreaAndrea Hlaváčková
Slovakia Katarina Kachlikova
4–6, 6–4, 6–2
Winner 14 April 2007 ITF $25,000 Spain Gran Canaria, Spain Clay Portugal Piedade, FredericaFrederica Piedade Spain Marrero, MartaMarta Marrero
Spain Suárez Navarro, CarlaCarla Suárez Navarro
W/O
Winner 1 November 2010 ITF $50,000 Nantes, France Hard (i) United Kingdom Anna Smith Bosnia and Herzegovina Jugić-Salkić, MervanaMervana Jugić-Salkić
Croatia Jurak, DarijaDarija Jurak
5–7, 6–1, [10–6]
Winner 26 September 2011 ITF $25,000 Clermont-Ferrand, France Hard (i) Bosnia and Herzegovina Jugić-Salkić, MervanaMervana Jugić-Salkić Russia Ivanova, EkaterinaEkaterina Ivanova
Russia Lykina, KseniaKsenia Lykina
4–6, 6–3, 6–2
Winner 29 October 2011 ITF $75,000 Barnstaple, Great Britain Hard (i) Czech Republic Birnerová, EvaEva Birnerová Austria Klemenschits, SandraSandra Klemenschits
Germany Malek, TatjanaTatjana Malek
7–5, 6–1
Winner 6 November 2011 ITF $50,000 Ismaning, Germany Carpet Netherlands Bertens, KikiKiki Bertens Germany Barrois, KristinaKristina Barrois
Austria Meusburger, YvonneYvonne Meusburger
6–3, 6–3

Performance timelines[edit]

Key
W  F  SF QF #R RR LQ (Q#) A P Z# PO SF-B F S G NMS NH

Won tournament; or reached Final; Semifinal; Quarter-final; Round 4, 3, 2, 1; competed at a Round Robin stage; lost in Qualification Round; absent from tournament event; played in a Davis Cup Zonal Group (with its number indication) or Play-off; won a bronze, silver (F or S) or gold medal at the Olympics; a downgraded Masters Series/1000 tournament (Not a Masters Series); or a tournament that was Not Held in a given year.

To avoid confusion and double counting, these charts are updated either at the conclusion of a tournament, or when the player's participation in the tournament has ended.

Singles[edit]

Tournament 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 SR W–L Win %
Grand Slam Tournaments
Australian Open A A A LQ LQ A LQ LQ LQ 1R A 2R 1R LQ 0 / 3 1–3 25%
French Open A A A LQ LQ A LQ LQ LQ 1R 1R 1R 1R LQ 0 / 4 0–4 0%
Wimbledon LQ 1R 1R 1R 2R 1R 1R 1R 2R 1R 1R 2R 2R 1R 0 / 13 4–13 33%
US Open A A A LQ A A LQ LQ 3R A 1R 1R 1R A 0 / 4 2–4 50%
Win–Loss 0–0 0–1 0–1 0–1 1–1 0–1 0–1 0–1 3–2 0–3 0–3 2–4 1–4 0–1 0 / 24 7–24 24%
Olympic Games
Summer Olympics A Not Held A Not Held A Not Held 1R NH 0 / 1 0–1 0%
Year-End Championship
WTA Tour Championships A 0 / 0 0–0 0%
WTA Premier Mandatory Tournaments
Indian Wells A LQ 1R 1R LQ 1R A 0 / 3 0–3 0%
Miami A LQ A 1R 1R LQ LQ A 0 / 2 0–2 0%
Madrid Not Held 2R A 0 / 1 1–1 50%
Beijing Not Tier I A 0 / 0 0–0 0%
WTA Premier 5 Tournaments
Dubai Not Tier I A NP5 0 / 0 0–0 0%
Rome A 1R LQ A 0 / 1 0–1 0%
Cincinnati Not Tier I A LQ A 0 / 0 0–0 0%
Canadian Open A LQ 1R A LQ A 0 / 1 0–1 0%
Tokyo A LQ A 0 / 0 0–0 0%
Career statistics
Titles 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Year End Ranking 377 277 233 177 175 239 168 122 61 84 123 73 137 NR $1,303,091

Doubles[edit]

Tournament 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Career
Grand Slam Tournaments
Australian Open A A A A A A A 2R A A 1R A 1–2
French Open A A A A A A A 1R A A 1R A 0–2
Wimbledon 1R 1R 1R 1R 1R 1R 2R 1R 1R 1R 1R 1R 1–12
US Open A A A A A A 1R A 1R A 1R A 0–3
Year-end ranking 430 507 664 253 362 256 158 151 115 146 153 N/A N/A

Mixed doubles[edit]

Tournament 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Career
Grand Slam Tournaments
Australian Open A A A A A A A A A A 0–0
French Open A A A A A A A A A A 0–0
Wimbledon 1R 1R A A 1R 2R 1R 1R 1R 1R 1–8
US Open A A A A A A A A A A 0–0

Fed Cup[edit]

Europe/Africa Group I
Date Venue Surface Round Opponents Final match score Match Opponent Rubber score
24–26 April 2001 Murcia Clay RR  Sweden 0–3 Singles Sofia Arvidsson 0–6, 2–6 (L)
 Romania 1–2 Singles Edina Gallovits-Hall 2–6, 2–6 (L)
 Belarus 1–2 Singles Nadejda Ostrovskaya 4–6, 1–6 (L)
21–26 April 2003 Estoril Clay RR  Ireland 2–1 Singles Kelly Liggan 0–6, 6–2, 0–6 (L)
 Poland 2–1 Singles Joanna Sakowicz-Kostecka 6–3, 6–3 (W)
 Hungary 0–3 Singles Melinda Czink 6–7(1–7), 6–7(3–7) (L)
PO
(Relegation)
 Netherlands 1–2 Singles Miriam Oremans 6–4, 6–3 (W)
Europe/Africa Group II
26 Apr –
1 May 2004
Marsa Hard RR  Egypt 3–0 Singles Yomna Farid 6–0, 6–1 (W)
 Romania 2–1 Singles Simona-Iulia Matei 3–6, 6–3, 6–0 (W)
PO
(Promotion)
 Ireland 2–0 Singles Kelly Liggan 6–2, 3–6, 2–2 r. (W)
Europe/Africa Group I
20–23 April 2005 Antalya Clay RR  Slovenia 0–3 Singles Tina Pisnik 3–6, 3–6 (L)
 Denmark 2–1 Singles Caroline Wozniacki 6–3, 4–6, 6–2 (W)
 Serbia and Montenegro 1–2 Singles Dragana Zarić 7–5, 3–6, 0–6 (L)
18–22 April 2006 Plovdiv Clay RR  Ukraine 3–0 Singles Olena Antypina 6–7, 6–2, 6–0 (W)
 Bulgaria 2–1 Singles Tsvetana Pironkova 1–6, 1–6 (L)
 Hungary 2–1 Singles Melinda Czink 6–1, 3–6, 2–6 (L)
PO
(1st–4th)
 Slovakia 1–2 Singles Daniela Hantuchová 2–6, 1–6 (L)
18–21 April 2007 Plovdiv Clay RR  Bulgaria 3–0 Singles Tsvetana Pironkova 5–7, 6–4, 6–3 (W)
 Luxembourg 1–2 Singles Anne Kremer 3–6, 3–6 (L)
PO
(9th–12th)
 Sweden 0–3 Singles Sofia Arvidsson 3–6, 5–7 (L)
30 Jan –
2 Feb 2008
Budapest Carpet (i) RR  Switzerland 1–2 Singles Emmanuelle Gagliardi 6–1, 6–4 (W)
 Hungary 1–2 Singles Gréta Arn 7–6(7–5), 7–5 (W)
 Denmark 1–2 Singles Hanne Skak Jansen 4–6, 6–4, 6–2 (W)
Doubles (with Elena Baltacha) Dyrberg/Wozniacki 3–6, 2–6 (L)
PO
(Relegation)
 Portugal 2–0 Singles Ana Catarina Nogueira 6–1, 7–6(7–1) (W)
04–07 Feb 2009 Tallin Carpet (i) RR  Hungary 3–0 Singles Agney Szavay 6–3, 6–2 (W)
 Netherlands 3–0 Singles Arantxa Rus 6–4, 6–4 (W)
Doubles (with Sarah Borwell) Thyssen/Wong 6–4, 6–0 (W)
 Luxembourg 3–0 Singles Mandy Minella 6–1, 6–2 (W)
PO
(Promotion)
 Poland 1–2 Singles Agnieszka Radwańska 6–7(2–7), 6–7(4–7) (L)
Doubles (with Sarah Borwell) Jans-Ignacik/Rosolska 5–7, 3–6 (L)
04–05 Feb 2010 Lisbon Hard (i) RR  Austria 0–3 Singles Patricia Mayr-Achleitner 2–6, 2–6 (L)
Doubles (with Sarah Borwell) Mayr-Achleitner/Meusburger 4–6, 4–6 (L)
 Belarus 2–1 Singles Ekaterina Dzehalevich 7–6(10–8), 6–1 (W)
PO
(5th–8th)
 Netherlands 1–2 Singles Chayenne Ewijk 7–6(7–5), 6–3 (W)
02–04 Feb 2011 Eilat Hard RR  Switzerland 1–2 Singles Patty Schnyder 1–6, 2–6 (L)
 Denmark 2–1 Singles Caroline Wozniacki 0–6, 2–6 (L)
01–04 Feb 2012 Eilat Hard RR  Portugal 3–0 Singles Maria João Koehler 6–3, 6–4 (W)
 Netherlands 2–1 Singles Bibiane Schoofs 3–6, 7–6(7–3), 3–6 (L)
 Israel 3–0 Singles Julia Glushko 6–2, 6–1 (W)
PO
(Promotional)
 Austria 2–0 Singles Patricia Mayr-Achleitner 7–6(7–5), 6–3 (W)
World Group II (Play Offs)
21–22 April 2012 Boras Hard (i) PO
(Promotional)
 Sweden 1–4 Singles Sofia Arvidsson 1–6, 4–6 (L)
Singles Johanna Larsson 6–7(6–8), 6–3, 4–6 (L)
Europe/Africa Group I
7 February 2013 Eilat Hard RR  Bosnia and Herzegovina 3–0 Singles Dea Herdželaš 6–4, 6–2 (W)

References[edit]

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  5. ^ Tongue, Steve (24 June 2001). "Keothavong plays down hype and raises the hope". London: www.independent.co.uk. Retrieved 25 April 2010. 
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  13. ^ "Hilton claims Costa scalp for biggest win of career". London: www.independent.co.uk. 25 June 2004. Retrieved 25 April 2010. 
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Preceded by
Elena Baltacha
Elena Baltacha
Katie O'Brien
Katie O'Brien
Katie O'Brien
Katie O'Brien
Elena Baltacha
British Tennis number one
16 June 2003 – 16 January 2005
30 January 2006 - 6 May 2007
14 May 2007 - 24 June 2007
24 September 2007 - 25 November 2007
14 April 2008 - 20 April 2008
15 June 2008 - 8 November 2009
11 June 2012 – 15 July 2012
Succeeded by
Elena Baltacha
Katie O'Brien
Katie O'Brien
Katie O'Brien
Katie O'Brien
Katie O'Brien
Heather Watson

External links[edit]