Anomoeanism

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In 4th century Christianity, the Anomoeans, also spelled "Anomeans" and known also as Heterousians, Aëtians, or Eunomians, were a sect that upheld an extreme form of Arianism, which denied not only that Jesus Christ was of the same nature (consubstantial) as God the Father but also that he was of like nature (homoiousian), as maintained by the semi-Arians.[1]

The word "anomoean" comes from Greek ἀ(ν)- 'not' and ὅμοιος 'similar': "different; dissimilar". In the 4th century, during the reign of Constantius II, this was the name by which the followers of Aëtius and Eunomius were distinguished as a theological party.

The semi-Arians condemned the Anomoeans in the Council of Seleucia, and the Anomoeans condemned the semi-Arians in their turn in the Councils of Constantinople and Antioch; erasing the word ὅμοιος from of the formula of Rimini and that of Constantinople and protesting that the Word had not only a different substance but also a will different from that of the Father. From that, they were to be called ἀνόμοιοι.

In the 5th century, the Anomoean presbyter Philostorgius wrote an Anomoean Church history.[2]

Notable Anomoeans[edit]

Notable opponents of Anomoeanism[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Encyclopaedia Britannica: "Anomoean"
  2. ^ Philostorgius, Church History.
  3. ^ Philostorgius, in Photius, Epitome of the Ecclesiastical History of Philostorgius, book 7, chapter 6.
  4. ^ a b Socrates Scholasticus, Church History, book 2, chapter 35.
  5. ^ Philostorgius, in Photius, Epitome of the Ecclesiastical History of Philostorgius, book 8, chapter 2 and book 9, chapter 18.
  6. ^ Socrates Scholasticus, Church History, book 2, chapter 40.
  7. ^ Philostorgius, in Photius, Epitome of the Ecclesiastical History of Philostorgius, book 5, chapter 3 and book 6, chapters 1–3.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h Philostorgius, in Photius, Epitome of the Ecclesiastical History of Philostorgius, book 8, chapter 2.

References[edit]