Tony McGuinness (footballer)

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Tony McGuinness
Personal information
Date of birth (1964-05-06) 6 May 1964 (age 50)
Place of birth Adelaide, South Australia
Debut Round 1, 1986, Footscray
v. St Kilda, at Western Oval
Height/Weight 176cm / 76 kg
Playing career1
Years Club Games (Goals)
1981–85, 1998
1986–90
1991–96
Glenelg (SANFL)
Footscray (VFL/AFL)
Adelaide (AFL)
113 (187)
109 (108)
113 0(79)
Coaching career
Years Club Games (W–L–D)
1998–2000 Glenelg (SANFL)
1 Playing statistics correct to end of 1998 season.
Career highlights

Anthony "Tony" McGuinness (born 6 May 1964 in Adelaide, South Australia) is a former Australian rules football player who played for Footscray and Adelaide in the VFL/AFL. His estranged wife is former Nine News Adelaide presenter Georgina McGuinness.

SANFL career[edit]

McGuinness proved his skills early in his career with leading SANFL club Glenelg, winning the Magarey Medal in 1982 at the age of 18. A dynamic and pacy left-footed rover, he featured strongly in Glenelg's 1985 premiership victory against North Adelaide, kicking 2 goals.

VFL/AFL Career[edit]

Like his Glenelg premiership teammate Stephen Kernahan, McGuinness then accepted the invitation to play in the more lucrative Victorian Football League. He was signed by Footscray and quickly justified his huge reputation. In five seasons at the Bulldogs, McGuinness missed only one game and consistently racked up many possessions, usually distributing it with precision by hand or by his trusty left foot.[1] He stood out in an otherwise mediocre team, especially in wet weather, and won the club best and fairest award in 1987.

After a particularly fine 1990 season, in which he was a key member of the Bulldogs' revival, McGuinness decided to return to South Australia in 1991 to play with the newly formed Adelaide Crows. He was appointed the club's first vice-captain and holds the honour of both captaining The Crows in their first ever game (a pre-season trial game win over Essendon in front of over 45,000 at Football Park) and of kicking the first-ever goal for Adelaide in the AFL season proper against Hawthorn, again at Footy Park.[2] McGuinness was Vice-Captain of the Crows for that game with former Glenelg team mate Chris McDermott taking over as Captain. He would remain the Crows Vice-Captain from 1991 until 1994.

In 1993, Adelaide made the finals for the first time, only to lose to eventual premiers Essendon in a famous Preliminary Final. Adelaide led The Bombers by 42 points at half-time but Essendon came back to win their way into the 1993 AFL Grand Final against Carlton by 11 points. McGuinness had an outstanding season, racking up 657 disposals (477 kicks, 180 handballs, the highest disposal count in his 11 year AFL career), and was recognized with his third All-Australian selection. After finishing 2nd in both 1991 and 1992, McGuinness won the Crows Club Champion award as Adelaide's best and fairest player in 1993.

He became captain for the 1995 and 1996 seasons but along with a number of other older and experienced players, he was delisted at end of the 1996 season by newly appointed Crows coach Malcolm Blight, ending his AFL playing career. History shows that while Blight copped a lot of criticism for axing so many established players, Adelaide went on to win their first AFL Premiership in 1997 over St Kilda and repeated as premiers in 1998 by defeating North Melbourne.

In May 1996, Tony McGuinness and long time Glenelg, South Australian and Crows team mate Chris McDermott set up the McGuinness McDermott Foundation which was launched in memory of five-year-old Nicholas Berry, and seven year old Nathan Maclean who died of cancer. The Foundation raises funds to improve oncology treatment for South Australian children.

VFL / AFL Career Statistics Summary[edit]

Statistics are correct as of the end of 2010
Season Team No. Games Kicks Marks Handballs Goals Behinds Disposals Brownlow Votes
1986 Footscray 11 22 273 32 108 28 381 6
1987 Footscray 11 22 369 53 145 34 34 514 15
1988 Footscray 11 21 353 55 107 13 23 460 13
1989 Footscray 11 22 365 43 119 14 16 484 9
1990 Footscray 11 22 412 44 148 19 26 560 14
1991 Adelaide 11 21 348 25 145 17 11 493 8
1992 Adelaide 11 19 337 30 140 26 29 477 3
1993 Adelaide 11 23 477 59 180 12 21 657 11
1994 Adelaide 11 21 352 38 148 14 8 500 8
1995 Adelaide 11 11 136 10 45 4 5 181 1
1996 Adelaide 11 18 261 41 81 6 17 342 5
Totals 222 3683 430 1366 187 190 5049 93

Post-retirement[edit]

McGuinness returned to his original club Glenelg as a coach from 1998 to 2000, but had little success, finishing 9th, 4th, and 9th respectively. With the Tigers decimated by injuries in 1998 McGuinness came out of retirement for a game at the age of 34.

Subsequently he commenced as an assistant coach at Port Adelaide Power AFL side in 2005. He resigned from this position at the end of the 2006 season, citing outside business interests and wanting to spend more time with his family.[3]

McGuinness resigned from the McGuinness-McDermott Foundation on 17 August 2010.[4] He also ran a sports retail business, Rowe and Jarman, which he sold to Amart All Sports in 2006.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Main, Jim; Holmesby, Russell (1994). The Encyclopedia of League Footballers. Wilkinson Books AUS. ISBN 1-86350-175-4. 
  2. ^ Youtube - First Game Highlights: Crows v Hawks 1991
  3. ^ "Family first in balancing work and life". Sunday Mail (SA). 2 August 2009. 
  4. ^ McGuire, Michael (18 August 2010). "Tony McGuinness parts ways with Chris McDermott". The Advertiser. Retrieved 18 August 2010. 

External links[edit]

Awards
Preceded by
Chris McDermott
Adelaide Best and Fairest winner
1993
Succeeded by
Shaun Rehn
Sporting positions
Preceded by
Chris McDermott
Adelaide Football Club Captain
1995–1996
Succeeded by
Mark Bickley