Anthony Antico

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Anthony Antico
Born (1945-06-16)June 16, 1945
Lido Beach, New York
Other names Tico

Anthony "Tico" Antico (pronounced "ahn-TEE-koh") (born June 16, 1945) (Lido Beach, New York) is a New York mobster and a reputed captain in the Genovese crime family.[1]

In 2005, Antico was indicted on federal racketeering charges and racketeering conspiracy, which included murder conspiracy, extortion, loansharking and witness tampering. Law enforcement identified Antico as a captain in the Genovese family, operating criminal activities in Brooklyn and Manhattan, as well as associating with then acting boss Dominick "Quiet Dom" Cirillo and captains Lawrence "Little Larry" Dentico and John "Johnny Sausage" Barbato,[2] the indictment claimed that Antico was included in a panel since the late 1990s of powerful Genovese family capos who decided to corrupt labor and construction unions in New York and New Jersey through bribing and extorting their locals in order to achieve influence with companies operating in those areas. Antico, Cirillo and Barbato were charged with murder conspiracy, as they reputedly plotted to murder an important prosecution witness.[3]

On October 19, 2005, Antico pled guilty to lesser extortion charges.[4] On March 4, 2006, Antico was sentenced to 30 months in prison.[5][6] He was released from prison on June 22, 2007.[7]

On July 29, 2010, Antico was convicted of racketeering for running a mob social club on Staten Island and conspiracy to extort money from a race track winner. However, he was acquitted of extorting a bagel shop and ordering the robbery of Staten Island jeweler Louis Antonelli, which resulted in Antonelli's shooting death.[8] Antico was sentenced to nine years in prison, a stiff sentence because the judge ruled that the testimony of government witness Salvatore Maniscalco tying Antico to the heist was credible and should be factored in the sentence.[9]

As of August 2013, Antico is imprisoned at the Butner Federal Medical Center (FMC) in Butner, North Carolina. His projected release date is June 12, 2018.[7]

Further reading[edit]

  • United States. Congress. Senate. Appropriations Committee. Treasury and Post Office Departments Appropriations, 1954, Hearings Before the Subcommittee of the Committee of Appropriations. 1953. [1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Robert Nardoza (April 5, 2005). "Genovese Family Acting Boss Dominick "Quiet Dom" Cirillo and Three Captains Indicted for Racketeering". The United States Attorney's Office, Eastern District of New York. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  2. ^ http://www.thelaborers.net/indictments/cirillo_indictment_finalnew.htm[dead link]
  3. ^ http://www.thelaborers.net/indictments/cirillo_doj_pr.htm[dead link]
  4. ^ Marzulli, John (October 19, 2005). "Whispering Wiseguy Cops Extortion Plea". New York Daily News. Retrieved October 22, 2011. 
  5. ^ Marzulli, John (March 4, 2006). "Geezer Gangsters Get No Senior Discounts". New York Daily News. Retrieved October 22, 2011. 
  6. ^ http://www.1010wins.com/pages/70525.php?contentType=4&contentId=190251[dead link]
  7. ^ a b "Anthony Antico". Inmate Locator - Locate Federal inmates from 1982 to present. Federal Bureau of Prisons. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  8. ^ Marzulli, John (July 29, 2010). "Accused mobster Anthony Antico convicted of racketeering, acquitted of ordering fatal S.I. robbery". New York Daily News. Retrieved October 22, 2011. 
  9. ^ Marzulli, John (November 11, 2010). "Longtime Genovese mobster Anthony Antico gets nine years in prison for illicit gambling club". New York Daily News. Retrieved 17 April 2012. 

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