Anthony Bledsoe

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Anthony Bledsoe
Born 1739
Culpeper County, Virginia
Died July 20, 1788
Castalian Springs, Sumner County, Tennessee
Nationality American
Occupation Surveyor
Politician
Military officer
Title Colonel
Spouse(s) Mary Ramsey Bledsoe
Children Abraham Bledsoe
Thomas Bledsoe
Sarah Bledsoe
Anthony Bledsoe, Jr.
Isaac Bledsoe
Henry Ramsey Bledsoe
Rachael Bledsoe
Polly Bledsoe
Prudence Bledsoe
Susan Bledsoe
Parent(s) Abraham Bledsoe
Relatives Isaac Bledsoe (brother)
Jacob Bledsoe, Sr. (brother)

Anthony Bledsoe (1733-1788) was an American surveyor, politician and military colonel. He served in the French and Indian War and the American Revolutionary War.

Biography[edit]

Early life[edit]

Anthony Bledsoe was born in 1733 in Culpeper County, Virginia (or Spotsylvania County, Virginia).[1][2][3] His father was Abraham Bledsoe.[3] His brothers included Isaac Bledsoe (1735-1793) and Jacob Bledsoe, Sr. (1724-1817).[1][4]

Career[edit]

He served in the French and Indian War of 1754-1763 in the Virginia militia.[1]

After the war, he served as a Justice of the Peace for Augusta County in 1769, Botetourt County in 1770 and 1771, and Fincastle County in 1773 and 1774.[2] He also served on the Fincastle Committee of Safety from 1775 to 1776.[2] In 1776, he commanded Fort Patrick Henry on Long Island of the Holston in Tennessee.[1] The following year, in 1777, he was elected to the Virginia House of Delegates.[1]

In 1779, he became a surveyor of the Western parts of Virginia and North Carolina to establish borders for further explorations to come.[2] The following year, in 1780, he became a Justice of the Peace for the newly created county of Sullivan County, North Carolina; in 1781 and 1782, he served as its state Senator.[2] In 1783, he was one of the surveyors of the North Carolina military land grant reservation.[2] The same year, in 1783, he became a Justice of the Peace for new Davidson County, Tennessee, named after North Carolina General William Lee Davidson (1746–1781).[2] During the American Revolutionary War of 1775–1783, he served as a Colonel in the Tennessee militia.[1][5]

Shortly after the war, 1785 to 1786, he served as a state Senator for Davidson County, Tennessee.[2] He also became an early settler of Sumner County, Tennessee, building what came to be known as Bledsoe's Station in Castalian Springs, Tennessee.[1][4] By 1787, he served as the Chairman of the Sumner County court.[2] He also served as a surveyor of the area, trying to keep Native Americans at bay.[4]

Personal life[edit]

He married Mary Ramsey Bledsoe (1734-1808) of Augusta County, Virginia in the 1760s.[2][3] They had five sons and six daughters:

  • Abraham Bledsoe [3]
  • Thomas Bledsoe [2][3]
  • Sarah Bledsoe [3]
  • Anthony Bledsoe, Jr. [2][3]
  • Isaac Bledsoe [3]
  • Henry Ramsey Bledsoe [3]
  • Rachael Bledsoe [3]
  • Polly Bledsoe [3]
  • Prudence Bledsoe [3]
  • Susan Bledsoe [3]

Death[edit]

He was murdered by Native Americans on July 20, 1788 in Castalian Springs, Tennessee.[5][4] He was buried in Pioneer Cemetery in Castalian Springs.[5]

Legacy[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h Anthony Bledsoe, Sons of the American Revolution, Col. Anthony Bledsoe Chapter (Sumner County, Tennessee). Retrieved March 26, 2014.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l William T. Durham, Anthony Bledsoe (1733-1788), The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture, December 25, 2009
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Jay G. Cisco, Historic Sumner County, Tennessee: With Genealogies of the Bledsoe, Cage and Douglass Families and Genealogical Notes of Other Sumner County Families, Genealogical Publishing Com 2009, p. 103 [1]
  4. ^ a b c d e Origins Of Tennessee County Names, Tennessee Blue Book 2005-2006, pages 508-513
  5. ^ a b c FindAGrave[unreliable source?]