Anthony Cronin

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Anthony Cronin
Anthony.Cronin.by.Patrick.Swift.jpg
Anthony Cronin, by Patrick Swift, 1950, National Gallery of Ireland
Born 1928
Enniscorthy, County Wexford, Ireland
Occupation Poet
Nationality Irish
Education University College Dublin

Anthony Cronin (born 1928 in Enniscorthy, County Wexford) is an Irish poet, novelist, biographer, critic, commentator and arts activist. He received the Marten Toonder Award (1983) for his contribution to Irish literature.

He is a founding member of Aosdána, was elected Saoi of Aosdána in 2003 and is a member of its governing body, the Toscaireacht. From 1966-68, he was a visiting lecturer University of Montana and from 1968–70, Poet in Residence at Drake University. He had a weekly discourse, 'Viewpoint', in the Irish Times from 1974–80. He has written biographies of Brian O'Nolan and Samuel Beckett. Arts activist who persuaded Charles Haughey - he was cultural and artistic adviser to the former Taoiseach - to found Aosdána and support struggling writers, composers and artists with the annuity known as the Cnuas. Involved in organising the first ever Bloomsday celebration. Produced television programmes including ‘Between Two Canals’ and ‘Flann O’Brien - Man of Parts’.

He lives in Dublin and contributes to the Sunday Independent.

Bibliography[edit]

His collections of poems include:

  • Poems (London, Cresset, 1958)
  • Collected Poems, 1950-73 (Dublin, New Writers Press, 1973)
  • Reductionist Poem (Dublin, Raven Arts Press, 1980)
  • RMS Titanic (Raven Arts Press, 1981)
  • 41 Sonnet - poems 82 (Dublin : Raven Arts, 1981)
  • 41 Sonnet Poems (Raven Arts Press, 1982)
  • New and Selected Poems (Raven Arts Press/Manchester, Carcanet, 1982)
  • Letters to an Englishman (Dublin, Raven Arts, 1985)
  • The End of the Modern World (Raven Arts Press, 1989 & 1998)
  • Relationships (Dublin, New Island Press, 1992)
  • Minotaur (New Island Books, 1999)
  • Collected Poems (Dublin, New Island Press, 2004)
  • The Fall (New Island Books, 2010)

Novels:

Literary Criticism & Commentary:

Poets Patrick Kavanagh and Anthony Cronin at the church in Monkstown with the carriage in which they had been proceeding about Dublin in the footsteps of Leopold Bloom, the main protagonist in Ulysses - 50 years after Bloom traversed the city in James Joyce's novel.
  • No Laughing Matter: The Life and Times of Flann O'Brien (New Island Books, 2003)
  • A Question of Modernity, a collection of critical essays by Cronin (Secker & Warburg, 1966)
  • Heritage Now: Irish Literature in the English Language (Dingle: Brandon 1982)
  • An Irish Eye (Dingle: Brandon 1985)
  • Art for the People?: Letters from the "New Island" (Raven Arts Press, 1995)
  • Ireland: A Week in the Life of a Nation, text by (Century Pub, 1986)
  • An Illustrated Historical Map of Ireland, text by (London, Cassell Ltd., 1980)
  • Personal Anthology: Selections from his Sunday Independent Feature (New Island, 2000)
  • Contributed to: Envoy, The Bell, Time and Tide, Nimbus, X magazine,[1] The Irish Times, and the Irish Independent, among others.

Drama:

Memoirs:

  • Dead as Doornails (Dublin, Dolmen Press, 1976)

Biography:

  • Samuel Beckett: The Last Modernist (HarperCollins, 1996)

Editor:

About:

  • Where the poet has been, Michael Kane (Irish Museum of Modern Art, 1995): portraits of Anthony Cronin and paintings inspired by his poems / with an essay by Ulick O'Connor.

Pseudonyms:

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Notion of Commitment, X, Vol. I, No. I (November 1959); Is Your Novel Really Necessary? (under the pseudonym Martin Gerard), X, Vol. I, No. I (November 1959); R.M.S. Titanic, X, Vol. I, No. II (March 1960); Goodbye to All That: A Child's Guide to Two Decades (under the pseudonym Martin Gerard), X, Vol. I, No. II (March 1960); A Question Of Modernity, X, Vol. I, No. IV (October 1960); Molloy becomes Unnamable (under the pseudonym Martin Gerard), X, Vol. I, No. IV (October 1960); Getting Wurred In, X, Vol. II, No. I (March 1961); Two Poems, X, Vol. II, No. II (August 1961); It Means What It Says (under the pseudonym Martin Gerard), Vol. II, No. II ( August 1961). Also in An Anthology from X (OUP 1988).

External links[edit]