Anthony Lister

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Anthony Lister
Born 1979
Brisbane, Australia
Nationality Australian
Education bachelor fine arts, apprenticed under Max Gimblett (2002)
Known for Painting, Drawing, Printmaking,installation,film making, musician
Movement Lowbrow (art movement), Street Art

Anthony Lister (1979 – present) is an Australian-born painter and Installation artist. He has had solo exhibitions across Australia, United States, Europe and UK.[1] He is notable within the Lowbrow (art movement) and has been featured on Juxtapoz.com[2] and FecalFace.com[3] and WoosterCollective.com.[4] He currently resides in Sydney, Australia.


Personal life[edit]

Lister was born in Brisbane, Australia in 1979. He graduated from the Queensland College of Art in Brisbane in 2001 and traveled to New York soon after where he mentored under the auspices Max Gimblett, one of New Zealand's most influential living artists. Lister began painting on the streets at the age of 17, a location which has endured as a key part of his practice as a space where he can take pleasure in his 'hobby' of producing art rather than the 'craft' of studio work. He has since exhibited his work extensively within Australia and internationally both in the gallery and on the streets, notably with Bogan Paradise, a three story exhibition in a disused sex shop in Sydney, Australia 2011, Los Angeles USA solo exhibition curated by Robert Gatsman 2011, Los Angeles solo show New Image Art 2011 and Unslung Heros, The Outsiders/Lazarides Gallery, London and Newcastle, UK 2012. Lister's wife and two children are featured in his "Have You Seen Them? The Listers" stickers. Photos and videos of his children are often seen in the "New" section of his official website.[5]

Lister's work[edit]

One of Australia's most renowned contemporary artists, Lister's work presents us with a grimy fusion of high and lowbrow culture with influences from a number of areas and genres, including street art, expressionism, pop art, and contemporary youth culture, often drawing from television and the "misguided role models" that result. Revelling in the “spirituality”, and the “heritage” of Western popular culture he takes this joint legacy and remoulds it into something equally alluring and grotesque, a perfect representation of the society he seeks to depict. Taking influence from the dirtier and rough techniques of “Bad” Painting and merging it with the spirit and practices of graffiti art Lister has embraced an explosive, scratchy, scrawling form of figurative art using a variety of mediums from painting, drawing and installation to film and music.


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