Anti-Jewish violence in Central and Eastern Europe, 1944–46

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Anti-Jewish violence in Eastern Europe included anti-Jewish crimes in various countries that occurred after the retreat of the Nazi German forces and arrival of the Soviet Union Red Army forces.

Poland[edit]

Romania[edit]

Hundreds of returning Jews were allegedly killed in Romania.[1] [2]

Hungary[edit]

Anti-Jewish manifestations, sometimes based on blood libel accusations, took place in Hungary in a dozen of places,[3][4][5] for example, in Kunmadaras (two or four dead victims) and Miskolc.

Slovakia[edit]

In Slovakia in Topoľčany 48 Jews were seriously injured. 13 anti-Jewish incidents called partisan pogroms took place 1–5 August 1946, the biggest one in Žilina, where 15 people were wounded.[6] [7]

Ukraine[edit]

In Kiev, Ukraine on September 4–7, 1945[8] around one hundred Jews were beaten, of whom thirty-six were hospitalized and five died of wounds.[9]

Russia[edit]

In Rubtsovsk, Russia a number of anti-Semitic incidents took place in 1945.[10]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Minicy Catom Software Engineering Ltd. www.catom.com (1946-07-04). "Institute for Global Jewish Affairs – Global Antisemitism, Anti-Israelism, Jewish Studies". Jcpa.org. Retrieved 2010-04-08. 
  2. ^ Jean Ancel, "The Return of the Survivors from Transnistria," in David Bankier, ed., The Jews Are Coming Back (Jerusalem: Yad Vashem, 2005), 241
  3. ^ Antisemitism: a historical ... - Google Książki. Books.google.pl. 1939-01-30. Retrieved 2010-04-08. 
  4. ^ "01 tanulm+választ.q" (PDF). Retrieved 2010-04-08. 
  5. ^ Kenez, Peter (2001). "Antisemitism in Post World War II Hungary - violence, riots; Communist Party policy | Judaism | Find Articles at BNET". Findarticles.com. Retrieved 2010-04-08. 
  6. ^ "CS Magazin". CS Magazin. Retrieved 2010-04-08. 
  7. ^ [1]
  8. ^ "State-sponsored Anti-Semitism in Postwar USSR. Studies and Research Perspectives; Antonella Salomoni". Quest. Issues in Contemporary Jewish History / Questioni di storia ebraica contemporanea. Retrieved 2012-07-26. 
  9. ^ Amir Weiner. Making Sense of War: The Second World War and the Fate of the Bolshevik Revolution. Princeton University Press. 2008. p. 192.
  10. ^ War, Holocaust and Stalinism: a ... - Google Książki. Books.google.pl. Retrieved 2010-04-08. 

Further reading[edit]