Anti-corruption and Economic Malpractice Observatory

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The Anti-corruption and Economic Malpractice Observatory, or OLUCOME, (l'Observatoire de lutte contre la corruption et les malversations économiques) is an independent, non-governmental anti-corruption watchdog group based in Burundi.[1] It is known to be critical of the government of Burundi and its policies.

The OLUCOME investigates allegations of corruption within the Burundian government and business sectors.[1] The organization claims to have investigated thousands of embezzlement and corruption cases over the years.[1] OLUCOME has estimated that corruption, which it claims is rampant in the country, has cost Burundian citizens 236 billion Burundian francs between 2004 and 2009.[1]

The OLUCOME has charged that the government lost over 24 billion Burundian francs in 2008 alone, due to corruption and non-transparent tendering processes.[1]

The deputy chairman of OLUCOME, Ernest Manirumva, was killed in a knife attack at his home in Bujumbura on April 9, 2009.[1] Manirumva was abducted from his OLUCOME office, and his home and work space were ransacked in the attack.[2] OLUCOME leaders have called for an international investigation into Manirumva's murder.[3]

In February 2012, OLUCOME president Gabriel Rufyiri joined a Bujumbura rally on behalf of imprisoned anti-corruption activist Faustin Ndikumana, calling on the government to release him and become "more transparent in recruitment".[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "Burundi anti-graft activist murdered: police". Reuters South Africa. 2009-04-09. Retrieved 2009-04-14. 
  2. ^ "Shock at Burundi corruption death". BBC News. 2009-04-10. Retrieved 2009-04-14. 
  3. ^ "Burundi anti-graft team demands probe of leader's murder". Agence France Presse (Google News). 2009-04-10. Retrieved 2009-04-14. 
  4. ^ Desire Nimubona (14 February 2012). "Burundi Civil Society Groups Urge Release of Anti-Graft Activist". Bloomberg. Retrieved 16 May 2012.