Anti-nuclear organizations

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Main article: Anti-nuclear movement

Anti-nuclear organizations may oppose uranium mining, nuclear power, and/or nuclear weapons. Anti-nuclear groups have undertaken public protests and acts of civil disobedience which have included occupations of nuclear plant sites. Some of the most influential groups in the anti-nuclear movement have had members who were elite scientists, including several Nobel Laureates and many nuclear physicists.

Types of organizations[edit]

Various types of organizations have identified themselves with the anti-nuclear movement:[1]

Some of the most influential groups in the anti-nuclear movement have had members who were elite scientists, including several Nobel Laureates and many nuclear physicists. In the United States, these scientists have belonged primarily to three groups: the Union of Concerned Scientists, the Federation of American Scientists, and the Committee for Nuclear Responsibility.[3]

Activities[edit]

Anti-nuclear groups have undertaken public protests and acts of civil disobedience which have included occupations of nuclear plant sites. Other salient strategies have included lobbying, petitioning government authorities, influencing public policy through referendum campaigns and involvement in elections. Anti-nuclear groups have also tried to influence policy implementation through litigation and by participating in licencing proceedings.[4]

International organizations[edit]

List of other organizations[edit]

Most of these groups are listed at "Protest movements against nuclear energy" in Wolfgang Rudig (1990). Anti-nuclear Movements: A World Survey of Opposition to Nuclear Energy, Longman, pp. 381–403.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ William A. Gamson and Andre Modigliani. Media Coverage and Public Opinion on Nuclear Power, American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 95, No. 1, July 1989, p. 7.
  2. ^ Fox Butterfield. Professional Groups Flocking to Antinuclear Drive, The New York Times, March 27, 1982.
  3. ^ Jerome Price (1982). The Anti-nuclear Movement, Twayne Publishers, p. 65.
  4. ^ Herbert P. Kitschelt. Political Opportunity and Political Protest: Anti-Nuclear Movements in Four Democracies British Journal of Political Science, Vol. 16, No. 1, 1986, p. 67.
  5. ^ a b c Lawrence S. Wittner (2009). Confronting the Bomb: A Short History of the World Nuclear Disarmament Movement, Stanford University Press, pp. 164-165.
  6. ^ "About Friends of the Earth International". Friends of the Earth International. Retrieved 2009-06-25. 
  7. ^ http://www.globalzero.org?name=2.htm&id=2
  8. ^ United Nations, Department of Public Information, Non-Governmental Organizations
  9. ^ Greenpeace International: Greenpeace worldwide
  10. ^ Profile from Helix Magazine
  11. ^ Henry Mhara (Oct 17, 2011). "Coltart elected anti-nuclear organisation president". News Day. 
  12. ^ a b c Lawrence S. Wittner (2009). Confronting the Bomb: A Short History of the World Nuclear Disarmament Movement, Stanford University Press, p. 128.
  13. ^ Lawrence S. Wittner (2009). Confronting the Bomb: A Short History of the World Nuclear Disarmament Movement, Stanford University Press, p. 125.