Antingham

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Coordinates: 52°51′09″N 1°21′07″E / 52.8525°N 1.35188°E / 52.8525; 1.35188

Antingham
Antingham Parish Church.jpg
St Mary and St Margaret, Antingham, Norfolk
Antingham is located in Norfolk
Antingham
Antingham
 Antingham shown within Norfolk
Area  6.12 km2 (2.36 sq mi)
Population 287 (parish, 2001 census)
    - Density  47 /km2 (120 /sq mi)
OS grid reference TG252329
    - London  134 miles 
Civil parish Antingham
District North Norfolk
Shire county Norfolk
Region East
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town NORTH WALSHAM
Postcode district NR28
Police Norfolk
Fire Norfolk
Ambulance East of England
EU Parliament East of England
UK Parliament North Norfolk
List of places
UK
England
Norfolk

Antingham is a village and civil parish in the north of the English county of Norfolk. The village is located about 6 miles (9.7 km) south of Cromer and 3 miles (4.8 km) north of North Walsham. The nearest railway station is at Gunton for the Bittern Line which runs between Sheringham, Cromer and Norwich.The Nearest Airport is at Norwich which is 17.5 miles (28.2 km) south of the village. The civil parish has an area of 6.12 square kilometres and in the 2001 census had a population of 287 in 120 households. For the purposes of local government, the parish falls within the district of North Norfolk.[1]

Location[edit]

The parish of Antingham has boundaries with seven other neighbouring parishes. To the north are the parishes of Thorpe Market and Southrepps. The eastern boundary, which follows the River Ant, is with Swafield, and south are the parishes of North Walsham and Felmingham. To west lies the parishes of Hanworth and Suffield with most of this boundary following the edge of Gunton Park. The parish is dissected north to south by the A149 road from King’s Lynn to Great Yarmouth .[1] The parish also straddles the railway line which runs between Sheringham, Cromer and Norwich. In the south east corner of the parish are Antingham Ponds which provide the source of the River Ant, a tributary of the River Bure.

Description[edit]

The village of Antingham sit astride the Southrepps road which is on the eastern side of the A149[2] and runs north to south from that road to the village of Southrepps. The centre of the village is at the crossroads of Elderton Lane, Sandy Lane and Southrepps Road. There is a level crossing on Southrepps Road 200 meters south of this crossroads. The parish church can be found in the south of the village close to the A149 in Church Lane. The Parish church is called Saint Mary's and stands next to the ruins of Saint Margaret’s Church which was abandoned in the late 17th century, when material from Saint Margaret's was used to repair Saint Mary's, after they had both fallen into disrepair.

History[edit]

Name origin[edit]

The name of Antingham originates from an Old English word meaning homestead of the family or followers of a man called Anta.[3]

The Domesday Book[edit]

Antingham has an entry in the Domesday Book of 1085 where the village, its population, records of land ownership, and details about productive resources were extensively detailed.[4] In the survey Antingham is variously recorded by the names Antigeham, Antingham, and Attinga.

According to the Domesday Book the main tenants at the time were Roger Bigot and Thurston Fitzguy. The survey notes the presence of four villagers and four smallholders on the land. A meadow, acreage, and ploughs of various values are among the items recorded in Antingham's entry in the Domesday Book.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ordnance Survey, Explorer Sheet 252, Norfolk Coast East, ISBN 978-0-319-46726-8
  2. ^ County A to Z Atlas, Street & Road maps Norfolk, page 40, Antingham ISBN 978-1-84348-614-5
  3. ^ A Popular Guide to Norfolk Place-names: by James Rye: Published by Larks press, Dereham, Norfolk, 2000 ; ISBN 0-948400-15-3
  4. ^ The Domesday Book, England's Heritage, Then and Now, (Editor: Thomas Hinde), Norfolk, page 186, Antingham, ISBN 1-85833-440-3
  5. ^ Domesday Book, Norfolk, Part I and Part II, 33, Morris, J. (General Editor), 1984. Published: Phillimore & Co. ISBN 0-85033-479-9

External links[edit]