Antlers Formation

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Antlers Formation
Stratigraphic range: Early Cretaceous
Type Geological formation
Location
Region North America

The Antlers Formation occurs as a band of strata from Arkansas through southern Oklahoma into northeastern Texas. It consists of 150 m of silty to sandy mudstones, fine- to coarse grained sandstones that are poorly to moderately sorted and cemented with clay or calcium carbonate. In places the sandstone may be conglomeratic or ferruginous.

Based on correlation with the Trinity Group of Texas, the Antlers Formation is estimated to be late Aptian-early Albian. This age range is supported by the presence of two dinosaurs that are also known from the Cloverly Formation, Deinonychus and Tenontosaurus.

Amphibians[edit]

Indeterminate frog remains. Possible indeterminate salamander remains.

Amphibians of the Antlers Formation
Genus Species Location Stratigraphic position Abundance Notes Images

Albanerpeton

Albanerpeton arthridion

Basal vertebrates ("Fish")[edit]

References: Cifelli et al. 1999; Wedel et al. 2000, Kielan-Jarorowska and Cifelli 2001; Nydam and Cifelli 2002.

Cartilaginous fish[edit]

Chondrichthyans of the Antlers Formation
Genus Species Location Stratigraphic position Abundance Notes Images

Hybodus

Hybodus buderi

Hybodontidae

?Hybodus sp.

Lissodus

Lissodus anitae

Polyacrodontidae

Ray-finned fish[edit]

Possible indeterminate amiid remains. Possible indeterminate lepisosteid remains. Possible indeterminate semionotidae remains.

Actinopterygians of the Antlers Formation
Genus Species Location Stratigraphic position Abundance Notes

Gyronchus

Gyronchus dumblei

?Palaeobalistum

?Palaeobalistum sp.

Mammals[edit]

Possible indeterminate deltatheroidan material. Indeterminate multituberculate remains. Indeterminate tribosphenidan remains.

Mammals of the Antlers Formation
Genus Species Location Stratigraphic position Abundance Notes

Astroconodon

Astroconodon sp.

Atokatherium

Atokatherium boreni

?Paracimexomys

Paracimexomys crossi

Reptiles[edit]

Crurotarsans[edit]

Possible indeterminate atoposaurid remains. Possible indeterminate goniopholidid remains. Possible indeterminate pholidosaurid remains.

Crurotarsans of the Antlers Formation
Genus Species Location Stratigraphic position Abundance Notes

Bernissartia

Bemissartia sp.

Lepidosaurs[edit]

Possible indetrminate scincid remains.

Lepidosaurs of the Antlers Formation
Genus Species Location Stratigraphic position Abundance Notes

Atokasaurus

Atokasaurus metarsiodon

Bemissartia

Bemissartia sp.

Ptilotodon

Ptilotodon wilsoni

Ornithischians[edit]

Ornithischians of the Antlers Formation
Genus Species Location Stratigraphic position Abundance Notes Images

Tenontosaurus

Tenontosaurus sp.

Saurischians[edit]

Possible indeterminate bird remains are known from the formation.

Saurischians of the Antlers Formation
Genus Species Location Stratigraphic position Material Notes Images

Acrocanthosaurus

Acrocanthosaurus atokensis

Astrodon

Astrodon sp.

Deinonychus

Deinonychus sp.

Sauroposeidon

Sauroposeidon proteles

"[Four] cervical vertebrae."[1]

Turtles[edit]

Turtles of the Antlers Formation
Genus Species Location Stratigraphic position Abundance Notes

?Glyptops

Glyptops sp.

Naomichelys

Naomichelys sp.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Table 13.1," in Weishampel, et al. (2004). Page 267.
  • Cifelli, R. Gardner, J.D., Nydam, R.L., and Brinkman, D.L. 1999. Additions to the vertebrate fauna of the Antlers Formation (Lower Cretaceous), southeastern Oklahoma. Oklahoma Geology Notes 57:124-131.
  • Nydam, R.L. and R. L. Cifelli. 2002a. Lizards from the Lower Cretaceous

(Aptian-Albian) Antlers and Cloverly formations. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 22:286–298.

  • Kielan-Jarorowska, Z., and Cifelli, R.L. 2001. Primitive boreosphenidan mammal (?Deltatheroida) from the Early Cretaceous of Oklahoma. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica 46: 377-391.
  • Wedel, M.J., Cifelli, R.L., and Sanders, R. K. 2000. Sauroposeidon Proteles, A new sauropod from the Early Cretaceous of Oklahoma. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 20:109-114.