Antonio Martorell

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Antonio Martorell
Born Antonio Martorell Cardona
18 April 1939
Santurce, Puerto Rico
Nationality Puerto Rican
Education Madrid, Spain
Known for Painting, writer, educator, broadcaster
Notable work(s) Painter:
‘Escarabajo’ [Beetle][1]
‘Espejuelos’ [Glasses][2]
Writer:
La Piel de la Memoria
El Libro Dibujado
Awards Bienal de Arte de San Juan
Patron(s) Museo de Arte de Ponce
Puerto Rico Museum of Contemporary Art
Puerto Rico Museum of Art
Website
http://www.antoniomartorell.com

Antonio ("Toño") Martorell Cardona (born 1939) is a Puerto Rican painter, graphic artist, writer and radio and television personality. He regularly exhibits in Puerto Rico and the United States and participates in arts events around the world. He spends his time between his workshops in Ponce, Hato Rey, and New York, his presentations worldwide and his academic work in Cayey, Puerto Rico.

Early years[edit]

Martorell Cardona was born on April 18, 1939, in Santurce, Puerto Rico. He is the son of Antonio Martorell II and Luisa Cardona. He is the first of three children. He first started showing interest in arts as a small child with drawings.

Schooling[edit]

He studied diplomacy at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.,[3] and then went to study painting with Julio Martín Caro in Madrid.[4] In the 1960s, he worked in Ponce, collaborating with Sor Isolina Ferre in the creation of community art workshops.[5] He also worked at the workshop of Lorenzo Homar at the Instituto de Cultura Puertorriqueña. He currently is the Resident Artist of the University of Puerto Rico at Cayey[6] and directs the Ramón Frade Museum at the same institution.

Career[edit]

Martorell's incursion into the arts came by the way of theater on 25 April 2001. He participated in the scenography of "Celebración Verdiana " for the opera by Plácido Domingo.[7]

Painting[edit]

Martorell currently has a workshop in New York[8] and another one on Calle Salmon (old Calle Comercio) in barrio Playa, Ponce, at a building that dates to 1815[9] and which he has occupied since 2007.[10] Of his breezy workshop at Playa de Ponce and his spiritual connection there he has said "more than Ponceño, I am a Playero...My north now is the South and its wide horizons."[11]

Martorell was the winner of the Bienal de Arte de San Juan, and has illustrated books of several authors including Alma Rosa Flor, Heraclio Cepeda, Nicholasa Mohr, and Pura Belpré. He also illustrated the ABC de Puerto Rico published by Troutman Press.

Writing[edit]

In the 1980s, Martorell dedicated himself to writing, producing various books.[12] As a writer, Martorell has written books such as La piel de la memoria (translated as Memory's Tattoo by Andrew Hurley), and El libro dibujado (The Drawn Book). He currently writes a column for Escenario, a section of Puerto Rican newspaper El Vocero.

Personal life[edit]

He is the father of dancer Alejandra Martorell, stepfather of Giovanni Rodríguez, who directed the cult film, Red Canyon, and the grandfather of Gael Rodríguez.[13]

In December 2006, Martorell's workshop in Cayey, Puerto Rico, was subjected to arson with the lost of many works of art.[14]

Works[edit]

The most extensive publication on Martorell's work is Antonio Díaz-Royo's biography Martorell: la aventura de la creación (The Adventure of Creation).[15] His paintings are found at the Instituto de Cultura Puertorriqueña, Museo de la Universidad de Puerto Rico, Museo de Arte de Ponce, Museo de Arte de Puerto Rico, Galería Nacional de San Salvador, Museo de Arte Moderno de México, Museo del Barrio, and Whitney Museum.[16]

Publications[edit]

  • La piel de la memoria. [Puerto Rico]: Ediciones Envergadura, 1991.
  • El libro dibujado: el dibujo librado. Cayey [P.R.]; New York: Ediciones Envergadura, 1995.
  • Memory’s Tattoo. Translation of La piel de la memoria from the Spanish by Andrew Hurley; foreword by Luis Rafael Sánchez. San Juan, P.R.: Editorial Plaza Mayor, 2005. ISBN 1-56328-239-9.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Antonio Martorell Removes His Paintings from the Supreme Court. Repeating Islands: News and commentary on Caribbean culture, literature, and the arts. Retrieved 26 July 2012.
  2. ^ Antonio Martorell Removes His Paintings from the Supreme Court. Repeating Islands: News and commentary on Caribbean culture, literature, and the arts. Retrieved 26 July 2012.
  3. ^ Espacio Tangente: Amores marinos. Silvia Alvarez Curbelo. Arte Publico en Puerto Rico. Retrieved 26 July 2012.
  4. ^ Antonio Martorell (1939- ): Honoris Causa UT 1997. Universidad del Turabo. December 2011. Retrieved 26 July 2012.
  5. ^ Antonio Martorell (1939- ): Honoris Causa UT 1997. Universidad del Turabo. December 2011. Retrieved 26 July 2012.
  6. ^ Museo de Arte de Ponce: Circulo del Arte. Museo de Aret de Ponce. Ponce, Puerto Rico. Retrieved 26 July 2012.
  7. ^ Galeria de Arte: Antonio Martorell. PRFrogui.com Retrieved 26 July 2012.
  8. ^ Antonio Martorell. Community Arts University without Walls (CAUWW). Centro de Estudios Avanzados de Puerto Rico y el Caribe. 18 October 2011. Retrieved 26 July 2012.
  9. ^ Creación de la Playa de Ponce. Talleres Comunitarios: Espacio Tangente. Arte Publico en Puerto Rico. Retrieved 26 July 2012.
  10. ^ Vivo el tributo a Toño Martorell. La Perla del Sur. Ponce, Puerto Rico. Year 30. Issue 1493. 1 July 2012. Page 26. Retrieved 26 July 2012.
  11. ^ Vivo el tributo a Toño Martorell. La Perla del Sur. Ponce, Puerto Rico. Year 30. Issue 1493. 1 July 2012. Page 26. Retrieved 26 July 2012.
  12. ^ Antonio Martorell (1939- ): Honoris Causa UT 1997. Universidad del Turabo. December 2011. Retrieved 26 July 2012.
  13. ^ "Red Canyon (2008)". IMDb. Retrieved 2009-11-05. 
  14. ^ Galeria de Arte: Antonio Martorell. PrFrogui.com Retrieved 26 July 2012.
  15. ^ Díaz-Royo, Antonio. Martorell: la aventura de la creación. San Juan, P.R.: La Editorial Universidad de Puerto Rico, 2008. ISBN 0-8477-0427-0
  16. ^ Antonio Martorell (1939- ): Honoris Causa UT 1997. Universidad del Turabo. December 2011. Retrieved 26 July 2012.

External links[edit]