Antonov A-11

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A-11
Role High performance single seat glider
National origin USSR
Manufacturer Antonov
Designer Oleg Antonov, Konstantinovitch
First flight 12 May 1958
Number built 150

The Antonov A-11 is a single seat, high performance, all-metal sailplane built in the U.S.S.R in the late 1950s. One hundred and fifty were produced.

Design and development[edit]

The almost all-metal A-11 was Antonov's first non-wood framed sailplane.[1] It is a cantilever mid-wing monoplane, with straight tapered wings mostly swept on the trailing edge and set with 1.5° of dihedral but no washout. A single spar with a metal skinned leading edge forward of it and fabric covering aft forms most of the span but the curved tips are supported by twin spars. The fabric covered ailerons are slotted, with set-back hinges and mass balances. They can be drooped together through 8° to act as flaps. Inboard there are slotted flaps on the trailing edges and spoilers, mounted at mid-chord and quite close to the fuselage, of the gapless kind opening upwards only.[2][3]

The fuselage of the A-11 is a metal monocoque of pod and boom form, with a gradual transition between the two. It carries an all-metal, straight edged 90° V- or butterfly tail, its control surfaces mass balanced with external weights. The three piece canopy stretches smoothly from the nose to above mid-chord without a stepped windscreen. There is a retractable monowheel undercarriage, sprung but without brakes, assisted by a rubber mounted skid forward of the wheel and a tail bumper aft formed by a short, shallow ventral fin.[2][3]

The A-11 first flew on 12 May 1958. It was approved for aerobatics, spins and cloud flying.[2]

Aircraft on display[edit]

Information from Ogden[4]

Specifications (Antonov A-11)[edit]

Data from The World's Sailplanes:Die Segelflugzeuge der Welt:Les Planeurs du Monde Volume II[2]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1
  • Length: 6 m (19 ft 8 in)
  • Wingspan: 16.5 m (54 ft 2 in)
  • Height: 1.2 m (3 ft 11 in) at cockpit
  • Wing area: 12.15 m2 (130.8 sq ft)
  • Aspect ratio: 22.4
  • Airfoil: TsAGI R 111 A[note 1]
  • Empty weight: 294 kg (648 lb)
  • Gross weight: 400 kg (882 lb)

Performance

  • Stall speed: 60 km/h (37 mph; 32 kn)
  • Never exceed speed: 350 km/h (217 mph; 189 kn)
  • Aerotow speed: 200 km/h (124.3 mph; 108.0 kn)
  • Winch launch speed: 120 km/h (74.6 mph; 64.8 kn)
  • g limits: +8.66 -3.9 at 300 km/h (186.4 mph; 162.0 kn)
  • Maximum glide ratio: 32 at 97 km/h (60.3 mph; 52.4 kn)
  • Rate of sink: 0.74 m/s (146 ft/min) at 86 km/h (53.4 mph; 46.4 kn)
  • Wing loading: 33 kg/m2 (6.8 lb/sq ft)

See also[edit]

Related development
Related lists

List of gliders

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Most sources refer to P III; Simons refers to R III for the airfoil of the A-9 glider. The difference is generated by transliteration between Cyrillic script and Roman where p in Cyrillic is R in Roman script.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Simons, Martin (2006). Sailplanes 1945–1965 (2nd revised ed.). Königswinter: EQIP Werbung & Verlag GmbH. p. 135. ISBN 3 9807977 4 0. 
  2. ^ a b c d Shenstone, B.S.; K.G. Wilkinson (1963). The World's Sailplanes:Die Segelflugzeuge der Welt:Les Planeurs du Monde Volume II (in Primarily English with French and German) (1st ed.). Zurich: Organisation Scientifique et Technique Internationale du Vol a Voile (OSTIV) and Schweizer Aero-Revue. pp. 242–243. 
  3. ^ a b Taylor, John W R (1962). Jane's All the World's Aircraft 1962–63. London: Sampson Low, Marston & Co. Ltd. p. 342. 
  4. ^ Ogden, Bob (2011). Aviation Museums and Collections of North America (2 ed.). Tonbridge, Kent: Air-Britain (Historians). pp. 357, 464. ISBN 978-0-85130-385-7. 

Bibliography[edit]

  • Ogden, Bob (2011). Aviation Museums and Collections of North America (2 ed.). Tonbridge, Kent: Air-Britain (Historians). pp. 357, 464. ISBN 978-0-85130-385-7. 
  • Shenstone, B.S.; K.G. Wilkinson (1963). The World's Sailplanes:Die Segelflugzeuge der Welt:Les Planeurs du Monde Volume II (in Primarily English with French and German) (1st ed.). Zurich: Organisation Scientifique et Technique Internationale du Vol a Voile (OSTIV) and Schweizer Aero-Revue. pp. 242–243. 
  • Simons, Martin (2006). Sailplanes 1945–1965 (2nd revised ed.). Königswinter: EQIP Werbung & Verlag GmbH. p. 135. ISBN 3 9807977 4 0. 
  • Taylor, John W R (1962). Jane's All the World's Aircraft 1962–63. London: Sampson Low, Marston & Co. Ltd. p. 342.