Antonov A-13

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A-13
Role Sailplane
Manufacturer Antonov
First flight 1958
Number built ~200

The Antonov A-13 was a Soviet aerobatic sailplane flown in the 1950s and 60s. It was a small, single-seat, all-metal aircraft developed from the A-11 and which could optionally be fitted with that aircraft's longer-span wings. It was a mid-wing monoplane with a tadpole-like fuselage and a V-tail. In February 1962, an A-13 was fitted with a small turbojet engine to set a world airspeed record of 196 km/h (122 mph) for an aircraft up to 500 kg. This jet-powered version is known as the An-13

Variants[edit]

  • A-13 : Single-seat aerobatic sailplane.
  • A-13M : Motor glider version, fitted with a low-powered piston engine.
  • An-13 : Jet-powered version.

Specifications (Antonov A-13)[edit]

Data from The World's Sailplanes:Die Segelflugzeuge der Welt:Les Planeurs du Monde Volume II[1]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1
  • Length: 6 m (19 ft 8 in)
  • Wingspan: 12.1 m (39 ft 8 in)
  • Height: 1.2 m (3 ft 11 in) at cockpit
  • Wing area: 10.44 m2 (112.4 sq ft)
  • Aspect ratio: 13.8
  • Airfoil: TsAGI R-32-15[note 1]
  • Empty weight: 254 kg (560 lb)
  • Gross weight: 360 kg (794 lb)

Performance

  • Stall speed: 70 km/h (43 mph; 38 kn)
  • Never exceed speed: 350 km/h (217 mph; 189 kn)
  • Rough air speed max: 350 km/h (217.5 mph; 189.0 kn)
  • Aerotow speed: 200 km/h (124.3 mph; 108.0 kn)
  • Winch launch speed: 120 km/h (74.6 mph; 64.8 kn)
  • g limits: +8.66 -3.9 at 300 km/h (186.4 mph; 162.0 kn)
  • Maximum glide ratio: 25 at 112 km/h (69.6 mph; 60.5 kn)
  • Rate of sink: 1.14 m/s (224 ft/min) at 97 km/h (60.3 mph; 52.4 kn)
  • Wing loading: 34.5 kg/m2 (7.1 lb/sq ft)


See also[edit]

Related development


Related lists

List of gliders

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Some sources refer to P-32-15; Simons refers to R-32-15 for this aerofoil. The difference is generated by transliteration between Cyrillic script and Roman where p in Cyrillic is R in Roman script.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Shenstone, B.S.; K.G. Wilkinson (1963). The World's Sailplanes:Die Segelflugzeuge der Welt:Les Planeurs du Monde Volume II (in Primarily English with French and German) (1st ed.). Zurich: Organisation Scientifique et Technique Internationale du Vol a Voile (OSTIV) and Schweizer Aero-Revue. pp. 243–245. 
  • Shenstone, B.S.; K.G. Wilkinson (1963). The World's Sailplanes:Die Segelflugzeuge der Welt:Les Planeurs du Monde Volume II (in Primarily English with French and German) (1st ed.). Zurich: Organisation Scientifique et Technique Internationale du Vol a Voile (OSTIV) and Schweizer Aero-Revue. pp. 243–245.