Aparanta

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Aparanta, or Aparantaka (meaning "Western border") was a geographical region of ancient India, variously corresponding to the northern Konkan, northern Gujarat, Kathiawar, Kachch and Sindh.

A rough sketch of the ancient region of Aparanta

The Junagadh inscription of Rudradaman mentions that during Ashoka's reign, a Yonaraja (literally; Ionian, or Greek, King), Tushaspa was the governor of Aparanta.[1] A Buddhist text, the Mahavamsa states (xii.5) that at the conclusion of the Third Buddhist Council (c.250 BCE), a Yona (Greek) Thera (monk) Dhammarakkhita was sent here by the emperor Ashoka to preach Dhamma[2] and 37,000 people embraced Buddhism due to his effort (Mahavamsa, xii.34-6). According to Buddhist scholar A.K. Warder, the Dharmaguptaka sect originated here.[3]

Aparanta is regraded as an umbrella term for Shurparakadesha for Konkan, to include in the North and Gomantaka in the south with the river Kundalika to serving as a dividing line in between the two.[4]

Aparanta is also the name of a book on goa titled "Goa Aparnta - Land Beyond The End". The book is a comprehensive insight into Goa and its origins.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Thapar R. (2001), Aśoka and the Decline of the Mauryas, Oxford University Press, New Delhi, ISBN 0-19-564445-X, p.128
  2. ^ Thapar R. (2001), Aśoka and the Decline of the Mauryas, Oxford University Press, New Delhi, ISBN 0-19-564445-X, p.47
  3. ^ Indian Buddhism by A.K. Warder Motilal Banarsidass: 2000. ISBN 81-208-1741-9 pg 278[1]
  4. ^ Kamat Satoskar, B.D. (1982). Gomantak:Prakruti ani Sanskruti(Marathi). Pune: Shubhada publications. p. 39.