Apiales

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Apiales
Umbella.jpg
Inflorescence of a wild carrot, Daucus carota, in the Apiaceae family.
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Eudicots
Clade: Asterids
Clade: Euasterids II
Order: Apiales
Nakai[1]
Families[1]

The Apiales are an order of flowering plants. The families are those recognized in the APG III system.[1] This is typical of the newer classifications, though there is some slight variation, and in particular the Torriceliaceae may be divided.[2]

Under this definition, well-known members include carrots, celery, parsley, and ivy.

The order Apiales is placed within the asterid group of eudicots as circumscribed by the APG III system.[1] Within the asterids, Apiales belongs to an unranked group called the campanulids,[3] and within the campanulids, it belongs to a clade known in phylogenetic nomenclature as Apiidae.[4] In 2010, a subclade of Apiidae named Dipsapiidae was defined to consist of the three orders: Apiales, Paracryphiales, and Dipsacales.[5]

The circumscriptions of some of the families have changed. In 2009, one of the subfamilies of Araliaceae was shown to be polyphyletic.[6]

History[edit]

The present understanding of the Apiales is fairly recent and is based upon comparison of DNA sequences by phylogenetic methods.[7]

Under the Cronquist system, only the Apiaceae and Araliaceae were included here, and the restricted order was placed among the rosids rather than the asterids. The Pittosporaceae were placed within the Rosales, and many of the other forms within the family Cornaceae. Pennantia was in the family Icacinaceae.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Angiosperm Phylogeny Group (2009). "An update of the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group classification for the orders and families of flowering plants: APG III" (PDF). Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society 161 (2): 105–121. doi:10.1111/j.1095-8339.2009.00996.x. Retrieved 2013-07-06. 
  2. ^ Gregory M. Plunkett, Gregory T. Chandler, Porter P. Lowry, Steven M. Pinney, and Taylor S. Sprenkle (2004). "Recent advances in understanding Apiales and a revised classification". South African Journal of Botany 70(3):371-381.
  3. ^ Richard C. Winkworth, Johannes Lundberg, and Michael J. Donoghue (2008). "Toward a resolution of Campanulid phylogeny, with special reference to the placement of Dipsacales". Taxon 57(1):53-65.
  4. ^ Philip D. Cantino, James A. Doyle, Sean W. Graham, Walter S. Judd, Richard G. Olmstead, Douglas E. Soltis, Pamela S. Soltis, and Michael J. Donoghue (2007), Towards a phylogenetic nomenclature of Tracheophyta, Taxon 56 (3): 822–846, doi:10.2307/25065865 
  5. ^ Tank, D. C.; Donoghue, M. J. (2010). "Phylogeny and Phylogenetic Nomenclature of the Campanulidae based on an Expanded Sample of Genes and Taxa". Systematic Botany 35 (2): 425. doi:10.1600/036364410791638306.  edit
  6. ^ Nicolas, A. N.; Plunkett, G. M. (2009). "The demise of subfamily Hydrocotyloideae (Apiaceae) and the re-alignment of its genera across the entire order Apiales". Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 53 (1): 134–151. doi:10.1016/j.ympev.2009.06.010. PMID 19549570.  edit
  7. ^ Chandler, G. T.; Plunkett, G. M. (2004). "Evolution in Apiales: nuclear and chloroplast markers together in (almost) perfect harmony". Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society 144 (2): 123. doi:10.1111/j.1095-8339.2003.00247.x.  edit