Après-ski

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Après-ski bar in the Austrian ski resort of Ischgl.

Après-ski (French: after skiing) refers to any form of entertainment, nightlife or social events that occur specifically at ski resorts.[1][2] These add to the enjoyment of resort-goers and provide something to do besides skiing and snowboarding. The culture originated in the Alps, where it is most popular and where skiers often stop at bars on their last run of the day while still wearing all their ski gear.[3] Users that browse ski resort & hotel websites will commonly seek mention of the quality of après-ski in the area, and such information is often found. It is therefore seen as an important factor for skiiers to consider before booking a holiday. The concept is similar to the nineteenth hole in golf.

Though the word ‘ski’ is a derivation of the Old Norse ‘skíð’ via Norwegian, the choice of French is likely attributed to the early popularity of such activities in the French Alps, with which it was then linked.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Definition of après-ski". Merriam-Webster. Retrieved 26 November 2012. 
  2. ^ Flower, Raymond (1976) The History of Skiing and Other Winter Sports; Toronto, New York: Methuen Inc. ISBN 0-458-92780-5 pp 132-141
  3. ^ Lund, Morton (March 2007). "Tea Dance To Disco. Après-Ski Through the Ages". Skiing Heritage Journal 19 (1): 6–12. Retrieved 26 November 2012. 
  4. ^ Harper, Douglas. "ski (n.)". Etymology Online. Retrieved 21 November 2014.