April 29, 1992 (Miami)

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"April 29, 1992 (Miami)"
Song by Sublime from the album Sublime
Released July 30, 1996
Genre Alternative hip hop, reggae fusion, ska punk
Language English
Length 3:53
Label Gasoline Alley, MCA
Writer Bradley Nowell
Composer Marshall Goodman / Michael Happoldt / Bradley Nowell
Producer David Kahne
Sublime track listing
"Same in the End"
(4)
"April 29, 1992 (Miami)"
(5)
"Santeria"
(6)
"April 29, 1992 (Leary)"
Song by Sublime from the album Second-hand Smoke
Released November 11, 1997
Genre Alternative pop, rock, ska punk
Language English
Length 3:47
Label MCA
Writer Bradley Nowell
Composer Marshall Goodman / Michael Happoldt / Bradley Nowell
Producer David Kahne
Second-hand Smoke track listing
"Garbage Grove"
(13)
"April 29, 1992 (Leary)"
(14)
"Superstar Punani"
(6)

"April 29, 1992 (Miami)" is a song written by American ska punk band Sublime in 1996 from their eponymous album Sublime.[1] The song title refers to the date of the 1992 Los Angeles riots,[2] of which news spread throughout the United States following the acquittal of four police officers accused in the videotaped beating of Rodney King.[3]

Background[edit]

The official title of the song references the date April 29, 1992; however, the lyric is sung as, "April 26, 1992." It has been said this was a mistake, but the take was strong enough the band kept it. Theories have developed about the true integrity of the song's lyrics. The acts of crime including arson, robbery and vandalism referred to in the lyrics were purportedly committed by Nowell and other Sublime band members during the 1992 LA riots. The lyrics also offer a justification for the band's participation in the unrest:

They said it was for the black man,

They said it was for the Mexican
And not for the white man
But if you look at the street, it wasn't about Rodney King
It's this fucked-up situation and these fucked-up police

It's about coming up and staying on top
And screaming 187 on a motherfuckin' cop[4]

Alternate Version[edit]

After lead singer and guitarist Bradley Nowell's death, the two surviving members of the band released every mix and alternate version that the band had recorded. Along with those recordings, an alternate version of "Miami" was released on their 1997 compilation album Second-hand Smoke titled "April 29, 1992 (Leary)".

Personnel[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Sublime - Sublime - Album - MTV". Mtv.com. 1992-04-29. Retrieved 2012-06-21. 
  2. ^ "The Los Angeles Riots, 1992". Usc.edu. 1992-04-29. Retrieved 2012-06-21. 
  3. ^ "Rodney King Video of Beating Helped Drive Revolution". Huffingtonpost.com. 1991-03-03. Retrieved 2012-06-21. 
  4. ^ "Twenty Years Later, Sublime's "April 29, 1992 (Miami)" Is Still the Best Song About White Boys Piggy-Backing on a Riot.". April 2012. Retrieved 2013-09-25. 

External links[edit]