April A Taylor

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April A Taylor (born 1977) is an American writer and dark art, horror, fine art and portrait photographer.

Biography[edit]

April A Taylor was born in Metro Detroit in May 1977 and grew up in Taylor, Michigan,[citation needed] a suburb of Detroit, Michigan. She has been quoted as crediting Clive Barker, Michael Jackson's Thriller video and the original A Nightmare on Elm Street with getting her interested in horror at a young age.[1]

Career[edit]

Taylor is a self-taught photographer[2] and her work includes a mixture of Dark Art, Fine Art and Portraits. Her Dark Art & Fine Art work has been published[3] and exhibited[4][5] internationally. Her work has received rave reviews[6][7][8][9] within the horror community (including from genre actress Lisa Wilcox)[6] and in late 2010 she began appearing at horror conventions & sci-fi/fantasy/comic book conventions as an artist guest.[10][11][12][13][14] In 2011, some of her work was featured in the short horror film CathARTic,[15] written & directed by genre actress Devanny Pinn and her work was also featured on Fangoria.com.[16]

In June 2010 Detroit area radio station 93.9 FM named her their first ever Artist of the Month.[17][not in citation given] In August 2010 American Frame named her as their Featured Artist of the Month.[18] In March 2011 she was named runner-up for the Rondo Hatton Classic Horror Awards 2010 Artist of the Year.[19]

Exhibits/Publications[edit]

Taylor's work has appeared in 5 different countries to date (USA, Canada, Italy, Hong Kong & the UK), in a mixture of 100+ various art galleries, magazines, books, calendars, websites and special events.[3][4][non-primary source needed]

Writing career[edit]

In addition to photography, Taylor is also a professional writer, and many of her pieces have been published on photography sites.[20][21]

Personal life[edit]

Taylor has been openly homosexual throughout her career.[16][22] In several of her interviews she has referred to Clive Barker as an inspiration.

References[edit]

External links[edit]