Aquagirl

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Aquagirl
Aquagirl (Tula); Aquaman #33 (1967)
Publication information
Publisher DC Comics
First appearance (Morel)
Adventure Comics #266 (November 1959)
(Selena)
World's Finest Comics #133 (May 1963)
(Tula)
Aquaman Vol. 1 #33 (May–June 1967)
Created by (Morel)
Robert Bernstein and Ramona Fradon
(Selena)
Jack Miller and Ramona Fradon
(Tula)
Bob Haney and Nick Cardy
In-story information
Alter ego -Lisa Morel
-Selena
-Tula
-Lorena Marquez
Species Atlantean
Place of origin Atlantis
Team affiliations (Tula)
Teen Titans
Black Lantern Corps
Abilities Adapted for breathing underwater and resisting deep-sea-level pressure. Possesses super strength and toughness.

Aquagirl is the name of several fictional characters featured as superheroines in the comic books and other media produced by DC Comics.

Early incarnations[edit]

Lisa Morel[edit]

Lisa Morel is introduced in Adventure Comics #266 (November 1959) as one of several violet-eyed Atlantean children born unable to adapt to the watery world. They had been sent to the surface in waterproof lifeboats so they might survive among land-dwellers, and Lisa had been adopted by the scientist Dr. Hugo Morel and his wife. With Aquaman in danger, Lisa's water-breathing and telepathic powers awaken; she makes herself a costume identical to Aquaman's, takes on the name "Aquagirl" and fights alongside him. However, her new-found powers are short-lived, and she loses them permanently. This is the first and last appearance of the character.[1]

Selena[edit]

Selena is a young Poseidonis teenager who temporarily teams up with Aquaman under the name "Aqua-Girl" in World's Finest Comics #133 (May 1963) to make her former boyfriend jealous; she succeeds, making Aqualad jealous of her temporary status as Aquaman's sidekick as well. This is the first and last appearance of the character.[2]

Tula[edit]

Tula is introduced in Aquaman Vol. 1 #33 (May–June 1967).[3][4] After losing her parents soon after her birth, she had been found and adopted by one of the royal families of Atlantis. Given the title Princess of Poseidonis, Tula is schooled in Atlantean traditions, and never leaves the royal palace until she meets Aqualad (Garth) at age 15 in this issue.[5]

Tula sometimes helps Aqualad with missions during his time with the original Teen Titans, using the name Aquagirl.[6] When Aquaman leaves his throne to search for his then-missing wife Mera, Narkran takes over Atlantis as a dictator. His reign falls only when Tula leads a rebellion against him. Tula and Garth resume their romance when he returns to Atlantis, and they later appear in the 1980s revival series New Teen Titans to aid the Titans in bringing down the H.I.V.E..

Death[edit]

During the Crisis on Infinite Earths limited series (1985–1986), Aquagirl is killed by the villain Chemo when she drowns in water that he has poisoned.

Years later, in the Tempest mini-series, a woman claiming to be Tula enters Garth's life. In truth, it is a doppelganger created by the villainous Slizzath as part of an elaborate plan to siphon Garth's mystical energies for his own dark purposes. Garth sees through the ruse and is able to defeat Slizzath, and finally gain a sense of closure about Tula's death. It is also at this time that Garth adopted a new identity as "Tempest."

Most recently, Tula reappears in Teen Titans (vol. 3) issues 30 and 31. Aquagirl is brought back to life by Brother Blood — along with Hawk and Dove, Phantasm, and Kole — to fight against the Titans. After being freed by Beast Boy and Raven. Kid Eternity is able to lay the deceased Titans back to rest.

Tula has a statue in the "Hall of Fallen Titans" at Titans Tower, alongside the original Hawk and Dove, Kole, and others. A year later, Tula is channeled by Kid Eternity when the Titans face Blood again. She angrily pummels the villain, claiming to be enraged about being resurrected as his puppet. She later is then returned to the afterlife after her time limit in Eternity's body is reached.

Blackest Night[edit]

In the Blackest Night miniseries, Tula, Aquaman, and Dolphin appear as a group of reanimated Black Lanterns who attack Tempest and Mera. Tula and Dolphin argue over Tempest, at the same time mocking him for not saving them. Sensing Garth's hope that she could fight what had been done to her to, Tula tore out his heart, killing him and bringing about his reanimation as a Black Lantern.[7] Tula later appears to battle the Titans. However, her body is soon destroyed by a burst of white light emanating from Dawn Granger.[8]

The New 52[edit]

In The New 52 rebooted continuity, Tula is first seen as a shadowing female Atlantean reporting to the current King of Atlantis, Orm aka Ocean Master, about the attacks made to the boy born with purple eyes, who is believed by some to bring the end of Atlantis. Ocean Master ordered Garth to be returned to his mother unharmed.[9] She later battles Cyborg during Atlantis' invasion of the United States,[10] and later when Aquaman becomes the king of Atlantis, she's seen reporting to him and according the conversation she had with him, it is revealed that she and Orm share the same father, meaning that Orm is her half-brother.[11]

Lorena Marquez[edit]

Lorena Marquez is on a date at the San Diego Zoo when an earthquake shakes San Diego and causes it to sink deep into the sea, killing thousands — including Lorena's entire family. She comes into contact with Aquaman, who nurses her back to health as she discovers that she has developed the ability to breathe underwater like an Atlantean. The two manage to locate the other survivors of the quake, as well as Anton Geist, the scientist responsible for the catastrophe. Lorena and Aquaman have no choice but to begin rebuilding the city as "Sub Diego." When Ocean Master switches lives with Aquaman, Lorena assumes the identity of Aquagirl, adopting an aquatic costume.

Other versions[edit]

In the 1996 limited series Kingdom Come, Aquagirl is Tula II, the estranged teenage daughter of Garth (formerly Aqualad, now Aquaman).[12] She is named Tula after her father's late girlfriend, and is part of a team consisting of the other original Titans' children who end up taking Batman's side in the story's key conflict. In her appearances, Tula seemingly demonstrates a partial shapeshifting ability, changing parts of her body to resemble those of sea creatures. She is last seen battling Donna Troy during the climatic battle at the superhuman Gulag and is possibly killed by the nuclear explosion that ends the conflict

This Tula's mother is possibly Deep Blue, described in annotations for the series as "Mizuko Perkins," daughter of Tsunami and Neptune Perkins. In standard DC Comics continuity, Deep Blue is Aquaman's half-sister Debbie, the daughter of Tsunami and Atlan, raised by Tsunami and Neptune Perkins.

In other media[edit]

Television[edit]

  • In Batman Beyond, Aquagirl is Mareena, a member of the future Justice League and the daughter of Aquaman. The character was created specifically for the Batman Beyond episodes "The Call: Part 1" (November 11, 2000) and "The Call: Part 2" (November 18, 2000), in which Batman meets the "Justice League Unlimited," a future version of the Justice League. Aquagirl was voiced by Jodi Benson, the actress who provided the voice of Ariel in The Little Mermaid. When Batman is going over her file on the computer, it is shown that she is the daughter of Aquaman, with powers including control over water. She later reappears in the Justice League Unlimited series (which showcases the present-day lineup of the JLU) in "Epilogue". She has very distinctive platinum blonde hair; it is always wet and slicked evenly back. Her costume varies; she is usually portrayed as wearing a one-piece swimsuit of various colors with bare arms and legs and also wears fingerless gloves.
  • In Season 2 of Entourage, Mandy Moore portrays Aquagirl in the Aquaman movie that exists in the Entourage fictional universe. The storyline has Moore, who was playing herself as the ex-girlfriend of character Vince, about to be dropped from the project due to the turmoil of their personal relationship. Mandy is not removed from the movie however, and Vince and Mandy re-kindle their former romance. Following this, Mandy breaks Vince's heart again, stating that she still loves her former fiancé, Chris. Vince decides to continue working on the movie with Mandy still attached. The movie gains the highest-grossing movie opening of all time.
Tula as she appears in Young Justice.
  • Tula (though she is never referred to as Aquagirl in the first season) appears in the Young Justice episode "Downtime" voiced by Cree Summer. She is portrayed as the childhood friend of Kaldur'ahm who ultimately entered into a relationship with his friend Garth after Kaldur left Atlantis to become Aquaman's sidekick. Unlike the comics, the Tula in Young Justice is shown to possess magical abilities that help her manipulate water. When Kaldur returns to Poseidonis for a dinner with the royal family, he invites Tula as his guest unaware that she has left him for his best friend. She eventually tells him about this, and the two reconcile during an attack on the city led by Black Manta, with Kaldur departing on friendly terms when he eventually returns to the surface world. Tula and Garth make a cameo appearance in "Failsafe", working alongside Red Arrow, Rocket and Zatanna in a training simulation. In the episode "Alienated" set five years later, Tula's death is mentioned as one of the reasons Aqualad (who is undercover about the Light's partner) has apparently turned on his former team. This is the first instance of Tula being referenced as Aquagirl in the series. In the episode "Satifaction", her statue is among the statues fallen of heroes located in the grotto of Mount Justice. In the episode "The Fix", Tula appears as a psychic projection when Miss Martian and Artemis Crock enter Aqualad's mind.

Film[edit]

Video Games[edit]

  • Tula, as Aquagirl, appears in Young Justice: Legacy, with Cree Summer reprising the role. She serves as the coordinator of the Team, providing information on The Light's attempts to steal the pieces of an ancient statue, and keeping the pieces safe. Near the end of the game, Klarion disguised as Tempest tricks her into giving him the pieces of the statue, and kidnaps her, intending to use her magic to revive Tiamat in Bialya. The Team arrives to free Tula and defeat Klarion and Blockbuster, but is too late to stop Tiamat's revival. When Tiamat proves too powerful to kill, a weakened Tula offers to use her remaining magic to defeat and imprison Tiamat again, sacrificing herself just like Marduk did in ancient times. Tula succeeds, but is killed by falling debris. Tempest grieves her death, and Aqualad quits the Team, leading up to the events in the second season of the show.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Aquaman Meets Aquagirl!" Adventure Comics #266 (November 1959). The Grand Comics Database. Retrieved on December 4, 2008.
  2. ^ "Aquaman's New Partner, Aquagirl." World's Finest Comics #133 (May 1963). The Grand Comics Database. Retrieved on December 4, 2008.
  3. ^ "Aqualad's Deep-Six Chick!" Aquaman #33 (May–June 1967). The Grand Comics Database. Retrieved on December 4, 2008.
  4. ^ McAvennie, Michael; Dolan, Hannah, ed. (2010). "1960s". DC Comics Year By Year A Visual Chronicle. Dorling Kindersley. p. 123. ISBN 978-0-7566-6742-9. Aqualad found romance under the sea when scripter Bob Haney and artist Nick Cardy introduced him to fellow young Atlantean Tula, also known as Aquagirl. 
  5. ^ Greenberger, Robert (2008), "Anthro", in Dougall, Alastair, The DC Comics Encyclopedia, London: Dorling Kindersley, p. 17, ISBN 0-7566-4119-5 
  6. ^ "Some Call It Noise." Teen Titans (vol. 1) #30 (November–December 1970). The Grand Comics Database. Retrieved on March 14, 2009.
  7. ^ Blackest Night #2 (August 2009)
  8. ^ Blackest Night: Titans #3 (October 2009)
  9. ^ Aquaman (vol. 5) #14 (November 2012)
  10. ^ Justice League (vol. 2) #16 (January 2013)
  11. ^ Aquaman (vol. 5) #18 (March 2013)
  12. ^ from: http://www.titanstower.com/source/whoswho/kingdom.html

External links[edit]