Arabic Network for Human Rights Information

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The Arabic Network for Human Rights Information (ANHRI) is a non-governmental organization devoted to promoting freedom of expression across the Middle East and North Africa.[1] Based in Cairo, Egypt, the organization was founded by prominent Egyptian attorney and human rights activist Gamal Eid, who is currently the ANHRI's executive director.[2] It collects publications, campaigns, reports, and statements from almost 140 Arabic human rights organizations across the region and republishes them in a daily digest on its website.[3][4] The group focuses on supporting free expression, especially via the internet and mass media, and works on behalf of persons detained for expressing their personal views.[5][6][7][8][9][10][11] It also advocates against censorship in Arab governments.[12][13]

Its mission is described as follows:

Today, there are countless millions of internet users in the Middle East, but it remains difficult for users to find information about human rights. ANHRI provides a central site where Arabic readers can easily find links to and information about all human rights groups and their work in the region. The Network also focuses on and seeks the expansion of freedom of expression on the internet in the Middle East.

Above all, there are critical areas that are not only taboo intellectually in the Islamic world and culture, but for which there are also no groups in the region today to even work on, such as, the death penalty, and rights of Christian minorities. Our objective is to create a space where these issues and other vital information about human rights can be discussed freely, and where people who share an interest in these areas can create a community.[14]

The Arabic Network for Human Rights Information is a member of the International Freedom of Expression Exchange.[15]

In February, 2008, the network opened Katib Blogs, which makes it possible for those in the Arab world to obtain an Arabic blog that is uncensured to allow for the expression of ideas suppressed by some Arabic governments.[16][17]

In March, 2008, a legal service website, Qadaya,[18] was launched to provide a resource for journalists, researchers, and activists. The website provides information on court verdicts, important judicial cases, constitutions from various nations, and legal acts pertinent to the Arab world.[19]

In April, 2008, a website devoted to providing accurate information on Darfur for Arab journalists and decision-makers was launched, called Ifhamdarfur. The website provides a twice-weekly newsletter and gathers Arab news reports about the Darfur crisis.[20][citation needed]

Currently, its website and reports are blocked in Saudi Arabia;[21] it has been blocked since 2003.[22]

In November, 2011, ANHRI was awarded with the 2011 Human Dignity Award of the German Roland Berger Foundation (nl).[23]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "About Us". Anhri.net. Retrieved 2013-06-06. 
  2. ^ Granger, William. Gamal Eid: Executive Director, Arabic Network for Human Rights Information (ANHRI). World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers. 2011-12-13.
  3. ^ "Arabic Network for Human Rights Information Homepage". Anhri.net. Retrieved 2013-06-06. 
  4. ^ "ANRI Creates Arabic Version Of Blogspot To Promote Freedom Of Speech," AHN-All Headline News, February 14, 2008.
  5. ^ "Rights Group Condemn Extension of Egyptian Activists' Detainment," AHN-All Headline News, February 8, 2008.
  6. ^ "We need to keep Kareem in our thoughts," MENASSAT, Feb. 22, 2008.
  7. ^ "Saudi Arabia - Government urged to let detained blogger receive visits from lawyer," CNW-Canadian News Group, February 8, 2008.
  8. ^ "Saudi Arabia - Government urged to let detained blogger receive visits from lawyer," CNW (Canada) Group, February 8, 2008.
  9. ^ "Arab Ministers Propose Satellite Channel Restrictions". All Headline News. February 15, 2008. Retrieved 2008-03-06. Rights groups and press freedom advocacy organizations across the region have said the restrictions are based on "empty claims & irrational reasons," a statement from the Arabic Network for Human Rights Information said. 
  10. ^ "Saudi Arabia - Government urged to let detained blogger receive visits from lawyer". Canadian Newswire. February 8, 2008. Retrieved 2008-03-06. There has been no answer to the letter which Reporters Without Borders and the Arabic Network for Human Rights Information (ANHRI) sent to King Abdallah ben Abdel Aziz Ibn Saud on 10 January asking why Farhan was being held. 
  11. ^ "ARAB SATELLITE CHARTER MAJOR SETBACK TO PRESS FREEDOM IN REGION, SAY IFEX MEMBERS". 19 February 2008. Retrieved 2008-03-06. A new Arab "charter" for satellite TV will restrict independent news and information for people across the Middle East and North Africa, say the Cairo Institute for Human Rights Studies (CIHRS), the Arabic Network for Human Rights Information (ANHRI), ARTICLE 19 and other IFEX members and partners. 
  12. ^ "ANHRI Condemns Kuwait Parliament Over Proposed Censorship Bill," AHN-All Headline News, February 7, 2008
  13. ^ "Arab Information Ministers Resolve to Censor Satelite Channels," Arabisto.com, February 14, 2008.
  14. ^ "The Arabic Network for Human Rights Information". Anhri.net. Retrieved 2013-06-06. 
  15. ^ "The Arabic Network for Human Rights Information". Server.egypt.com. Retrieved 2013-06-06. 
  16. ^ "ANHRI Creates Arabic Version Of Blogspot To Promote Freedom Of Speech". All Headline News. February 14, 2008. Retrieved 2008-03-06. A new opportunity for Arabic bloggers has been developed by the Arabic Network for Human Rights Information (ANHRI) as a means for uncensored content to be published in Arabic. The freedom of speech advocacy organization hopes the Katib blog space will give young Arabs an opportunity to write about their experiences in a mode that has often been cracked down upon by governments in the region. 
  17. ^ "Rights societies against the new law". Gulf Daily News. Retrieved 2008-03-06. 
  18. ^ "Qadaya Home Page". Qadaya.net. 2012-04-26. Retrieved 2013-06-06. 
  19. ^ "Legal service Web site launched for Arab journalists," International Journalists' Network, March 27, 2008
  20. ^ "Press release announcing launch". Anhri.net. 2008-04-13. Retrieved 2013-06-06. 
  21. ^ "KSA rights group seeks to unblock websites," AME Info, Dubai, April 1, 2008
  22. ^ [1] Human Rights First Society, retrieved Sept 7, 2012
  23. ^ "2011 Roland Berger Human Dignity Award goes to Rhadia Nasraoui, The Arabic Network for Human Rights Information and Mazen Darwish", Roland Berger Foundation, November 22, 2011

External links[edit]