Arcadio Maxilom

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This name uses Spanish naming customs; the first or paternal family name is Maxilom and the second or maternal family name is Molero.
Arcadio Maxilom y Molero
Born (1862-11-13)November 13, 1862
Tuburan, Cebu, Philippines
Died August 10, 1924(1924-08-10) (aged 61)
Tuburan, Cebu, Philippines
Organization Katipunan

General Arcadio Maxilom y Molero (November 13, 1862–August 10, 1924) was a Filipino teacher and hero of the Philippine Revolution.

He was born in Tuburan, Cebu to Roberto Maxilom, the town gobernadorcillo, and Gregoria Molero. His family were members of the local gentry, or principalía. He worked as a teacher in the local school before joining the Katipunan, whose activities in Cebu were led by a young Negrense, León Kilat.

After Kilat's betrayal and assassination, Maxilom continued the revolution in Cebu. Under his command, the Katipunan was able to regroup in the central highlands, which Spanish forces found impenetrable. On December 16, 1898, Maxilom wrote a letter to the Spanish authorities in Cebu, demanding that the latter surrender. Weary after incessant fighting, the Spaniards quickly responded, asking Maxilom for two to three days to leave the province. By Christmas Eve, the Spaniards have left, leaving behind only three Catholic clerics.[1]

Little did the Cebuanos, indeed, all Filipinos, know that their newfound liberty would be short-lived, Spain having already been forced to sell the fate of their former subjects to the United States for twenty million dollars (see Treaty of Paris).

Maxilom is best remembered for stubbornly refusing to surrender to the American occupying forces even as his fellow revolutionaries in Manila and Cebu were starting to capitulate or collaborate with the new colonial power.[2] He finally surrendered on October 27, 1901.[3]:524

Virtually forgotten after the revolution, Maxilom died in his hometown of Tuburan, after a long bout with paralysis,[2][4] on August 10, 1924. His funeral cortège, joined in by leading revolutionary figures including Emilio Aguinaldo, stretched some four kilometers, in what remains to this day the longest in Cebu's history.[2]

Mango Avenue, one of Cebu City's main thoroughfares, was renamed Maxilom Avenue in honor of the general.

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.geocities.com/lkilat/page_12.html[dead link] Leon Kilat, chapter 12][dead link] at www.geocities.com
  2. ^ a b c Where is Gen. Arcadio Maxilom? - INQUIRER.net, Philippine News for Filipinos at globalnation.inquirer.net
  3. ^ Foreman, J., 1906, The Philippine Islands, A Political, Geographical, Ethnographical, Social and Commercial History of the Philippine Archipelago, New York: Charles Scribner's Sons
  4. ^ Kasaysayan 207: The Lives of Luis Flores, Julio Llorente, Juan Climaco and Arcadio Maxilom: Collaboration and Resistance in Cebu, 1898-1902 at blogspot.com

External links[edit]