Arch Deluxe

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Arch Deluxe
Nutritional value per serving
Serving size 1 sandwich
Energy 560 kcal (2,300 kJ)
Fat 32 g
- saturated 11 g
Sodium 960 mg (64%)
Percentages are roughly approximated
using US recommendations for adults.
Source: CSPI[1]
Arch Deluxe with Bacon
Nutritional value per serving
Serving size 1 sandwich
Energy 610 kcal (2,600 kJ)
Fat 36 g
- saturated 13 g
Sodium 1190 mg (79%)
Percentages are roughly approximated
using US recommendations for adults.
Source: CSPI[1]

The Arch Deluxe was a signature hamburger sold by McDonald's in 1996 and marketed specifically to adults. It was soon discontinued after failing to become popular despite a massive marketing campaign and now is considered one of the most expensive flops of all time.[2]

Product description[edit]

The Arch Deluxe composition from an advertisement

The Arch Deluxe was a quarter pound of beef, on a split-top potato flour sesame seed bun topped with a circular piece of peppered bacon, leaf lettuce, tomato, American cheese, onions, ketchup, and a "secret" mustard and mayonnaise sauce.

Variants[edit]

  • Despite failing seven years prior in North America, McDonald's Japan introduced in 2003 a nearly identical sandwich (without the peppered bacon) called the Tomato McGrand. It has since been discontinued.
  • "Royal Deluxe" is the naming of this product in France and Russia. It is still available there.[3]
  • In Australia, the McFeast Deluxe contained similar ingredients: ketchup, mustard, mayonnaise, lettuce, pickles, onions, tomato, cheese, a quarter pound of beef, and (optionally) bacon. It was discontinued in November 2009, and has reappeared sporadically since. The McFeast was never widely held as a flop, and was not marketed as a premium or gourmet item. It was succeeded by the Grand Angus, which was marketed as using "gourmet" ingredients.

History[edit]

In response to the demographic trend of longer lifespans and an expanding older market, and to its child-centered image, McDonald's made a conscious decision to attempt to market its food to a more adult audience. Rather than change its existing menu items or marketing strategy, the company decided to create a new line of sandwiches with what would hopefully be perceived as more sophisticated ingredients. It commissioned Executive Chef Andrew Selvaggio to create the Deluxe line of burgers including the Fish Filet Deluxe, Grilled Chicken Deluxe, Crispy Chicken Deluxe and the flagship Arch Deluxe.

The Arch Deluxe was released in May 1996 in one of the most expensive advertising campaigns to date. However, customers were turned off by the high price and unconventional ads, and consumer groups were upset by the higher caloric content. The brand was gradually discontinued, and is no longer found at McDonald's stores today.

It is estimated that McDonald's spent over $300 million on the research, production, and marketing for the Arch Deluxe. The company stated in 2003 that some of its initial research into adult marketing was recycled in the development of its successful line of salads.[4]

Advertising[edit]

The Arch Deluxe Logo

McDonald's hired Fallon McElligott, a Minneapolis-based advertising agency known for unconventional work, for its staggering $150 million ad campaign. Arch Deluxe ads were notable in that, unlike other fast-food ads, they did not really talk about the quality of the food. They primarily consisted of young children who would look at the seemingly complex burger and say "I don't get it", or "I don't understand what the big deal is." Some would even call the burger "yucky" or complain that "you don't even get a toy with that!" This line of indirect rebel advertising was very similar to The Coca-Cola Company's marketing for OK Soda two years before, which was also a flop. Steve Burns, who would later host the Nickelodeon children's show Blue's Clues, performed the voice-over for at least one of the commercials in the series.

McDonald's widely distributed coupons allowing the purchase of the otherwise expensive Arch Deluxe for only $1.00.

When studies showed that its first set of advertising was unsuccessful, and was possibly even hurting its existing branding, it switched to a more conventional McDonald's-style commercial, featuring Ronald McDonald doing adult activities, such as playing golf and dancing at a night club while stating, "McDonald's is growing up."

See also[edit]

Similar products from other fast food vendors:

References[edit]

External links[edit]