Archbishop Ryan High School

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Archbishop Ryan High School
Rightright.jpg
In Vite Mane
Remain on the Vine
Address
11201 Academy Road
Northeast Philadelphia
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19154
United States
Coordinates 40°5′6″N 74°59′11″W / 40.08500°N 74.98639°W / 40.08500; -74.98639Coordinates: 40°5′6″N 74°59′11″W / 40.08500°N 74.98639°W / 40.08500; -74.98639
Information
Type Private, Coeducational
Religious affiliation(s) Roman Catholic
Patron saint(s) Blessed Virgin Mary and St. Francis of Assisi
Established 1966
Oversight Archdiocese of Philadelphia
Superintendent Dr. Carol Cary
President Michael McArdle
Principal James Meredith
Asst. Principal Joseph McFadden
Frank Morris
Glen Galeone
Chaplain Fr. John Donia
Grades 9-12
Enrollment 1501[citation needed] (January 6, 2012)
Student to teacher ratio 21:3
Campus Urban
Campus size 35 acres (140,000 m2)
Color(s) Black, Red, Gold             
Slogan Belong. Believe. Become.
Mascot Raider(Men), Ragdoll(Women)
Accreditation Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools [1]
Publication The Vine (literary magazine)
Newspaper 'Ryan Review'
Yearbook 'The Sentinel'
Tuition $5,850.00
Alumni 30,000 +
Admissions Director Pamela McPeak
Athletic Director George Todt
Website

Archbishop Ryan High School (often called Archbishop Ryan or simply Ryan) is a Roman Catholic high school located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. Archbishop Ryan is the largest Catholic secondary school in the city of Philadelphia.

History[edit]

The doors of Archbishop Ryan High Schools opened for the first time in 1966 as a co-institutional facility, i.e., two separate single-sex facilities with separate administration and faculty for each side of the building. Founded under the jurisdiction of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Philadelphia, Archbishop Ryan was the twenty-eighth archdiocesan high school to be founded. The process of merging the two schools into one co-educational school began in 1988.

Ryan was the twenty-eighth archdiocesan high school, the sixth begun by Cardinal John Krol, who continued the tradition of furthering Catholic education in the Philadelphia archdiocese. The 35-acre (140,000 m2) tract on Academy Road accommodates a spacious school building, and outdoor athletic fields as well as parking areas. The original design by architects, Dagit Associates, eased the merger. The central shared facilities of auditorium, library media center, and chapel serve the coeducational student body. Ryan draws students from all across the Philadelphia area extending into the surrounding suburban areas.

Notable alumni[edit]

Academics[edit]

One of Archbishop Ryan's main attributes are the school's extensive and broad academic program. Offering many fields of study, Ryan offers a variety of studies such as English, Social Studies, Mathematics, Natural and Physical Science Studies, World Languages (French, Spanish, Italian, and Latin), Business, Technology, Religion, Music, and Fine Art Studies. Coursework is required in the fields of English, Social Studies, Mathematics, Natural and Physical Science Studies, Religion and World Languages.

Archbishop Ryan carries a traditionally successful Model U.N. team, with the team regularly representing the school in local and state area competitions. Regularly simulating the The General Assembly, Ryan has won the last 5 years of PA State League Competitions.

Athletics[edit]

The competitive boys' sports of Archbishop Ryan include Baseball, Basketball, Football, Bowling, Cross Country, Ice Hockey, Golf, Indoor/Outdoor Track and Field, Lacrosse, Soccer, Swimming, and Tennis. The competitive girls' sports of Archbishop Ryan include Basketball, Bowling, Cross Country, Field Hockey, Indoor/Outdoor Track and Field, Lacrosse, Ragdoll Cheerleading, Raider Cheerleading, Rugby, Soccer, Softball, Tennis, Volleyball and Swimming.

Extracurricular activities[edit]

With a variety of extracurricular activities, Archbishop Ryan emphasizes and stresses the importance of involvement and participation in the school and community with almost 94% of the student body participating in after school activities and sports. The school boasts well over 74 clubs with everything from Game club to a Fashion Design club, .

Archbishop Ryan has a theater program and is working to complete the construction of a new sound and lighting booth in their auditorium. Set to be completed in 2013, this booth will provide up to date Izod Surround Sound 55:1 settings to hopefully provide an ample opportunity for prospective students to test both sound engineering and leadership capabilities. The aesthetics themselves are planned to harken back to older times (a classic design theme has been growing in popularity in Ryan), although a definite design direction or theme has yet to be decided upon, leaving the renovations to remain blank plywood.

In recent years, Archbishop Ryan's chess club has earned a prestigious reputation, taking first prize in the Philadelphia Secondary School Chess Conference 5 of the past 6 years. Because of the school's excellence in PSSCC competition, members of the school's chess club have received 4 of the City of Philadelphia's 7 past Bobby Fischer Memorial Scholarships, which are $1000 awards to the college of one's choice given to students displaying exceptional finesse and critical thinking skills in intramural competition. Fisher's family established the Memorial Fund after reading through the late chess master's diary and discovering that he had been saved from drowning in the Delaware River after a match by a Philadelphia school teacher driving home from work.

The Ryan Review, Archbishop Ryan's award-winning newspaper, has received recognition year-after-year for journalistic excellence. All of the Review's editors are members of the Quill & Scroll International Honor Society for High School Journalism and the staff writers study closely with the editors. The staff uses Associated Press Formatting and InDesign to produce their paper. The Ryan Review does most of its own photography through the Photo Editor and two photographers through the use of a Nikon D40 camera with a 14-155mm lens. You do not need to be in the Journalism Course to submit written work or photo into the paper. All submissions should be sent to room 217N. This paper also features a unique texting service to allow student interaction with the editors. See the paper for details.

The Yearbook provides a way for students to participate in creating a yearbook which will be handed out to each graduating class as part of their prom fee. Students use InDesign, Photoshop and Paint to do layout work for the yearbook and take most of their own pictures, using digital cameras and a single Nikon D300. Freshmen, Sophomores, and Juniors, can purchase the yearbook on their own initiative.

References[edit]

External links[edit]