Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Lanciano-Ortona

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Archdiocese of Lanciano-Ortona
Archidioecesis Lancianensis-Ortonensis
Madonna del Ponte, Lanciano.JPG
Cathedral of Lanciano
Location
Country Italy
Ecclesiastical province Chieti-Vasto
Statistics
Area 305 km2 (118 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2004)
90,855
90,205 (99.3%)
Parishes 42
Information
Denomination Catholic Church
Rite Roman Rite
Established 27 April 1515 (499 years ago)
Cathedral Basilica Cattedrale della Madonna del Ponte (Lanciano)
Co-cathedral Basilica Concattedrale di S. Tommaso Apostolo (Ortona)
Current leadership
Pope Francis
Archbishop Emidio Cipollone
Emeritus Bishops Enzio d’Antonio
Carlo Ghidelli
Map
LancianoOrtona diocesi.png
Website
www.lanciano-ortona.chiesacattolica.it
Co-cathedral-Basilica in Ortona

The Italian Catholic Archdiocese of Lanciano-Ortona (Latin: Archidioecesis Lancianensis-Ortonensis) has existed under this name since 1986. It is a suffragan of the Archdiocese of Chieti-Vasto. The historical Diocese of Lanciano was created in 1515. It was united with the Diocese of Ortona in the nineteenth century.[1]

History[edit]

Until 1515 Lanciano was subject to the Bishop of Chieti. In 1562 Pope Pius IV, to end a dispute with that bishop, made it an archdiocese without suffragans. The first bishop was Angelo Maccafani, who was succeeded by Cardinal Egidio Canisio (1532); the first archbishop was the Dominican Leonardo Marini (1560).

In 1818, or 1834[2] the see of Ortona was united to that of Lanciano by Pope Pius VII. Ortona was an episcopal see in the time of Gregory the Great, who mentions the Bishop Calumniosus and his predecessor Blandinus. Another bishop was Joannes, who in 916 was the papal legate at the Council of Altheim. There is no record of a Bishop of Ortona after the tenth century. Pope Pius V in 1570 re-established the see, to which in 1569 the diocese of Campli was united. When, in 1818, Ortona was joined to Lanciano, Campli was assigned to the diocese of Teramo.[3]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Catholic Hierarchy page
  2. ^ The cited sources differ on the date; and [1] suggests a more complex chanin of events.
  3. ^ Catholic Encyclopedia article

External links[edit]

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainHerbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). Catholic Encyclopedia. Robert Appleton Company. 

Coordinates: 42°13′52″N 14°23′25″E / 42.2312°N 14.3904°E / 42.2312; 14.3904