Archduchess Hedwig of Austria

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Hedwig and her sister Archduchess Elisabeth.
Hedwig and her sister Archduchess Gertrud.

Archduchess Hedwig of Austria (September 24, 1896 in Bad Ischl – November 1, 1970 in Hall in Tirol) was the daughter of Archduke Franz Salvator of Austria and his wife Marie Valerie of Austria. She was a granddaughter of Emperor Franz Joseph I and Elisabeth of Bavaria.

Biography[edit]

Hedwig was born on 24 September 1896 in Bad Ischl. Empress Elisabeth visited her daughter shortly after delivery and sent a telegram to Vienna informative. The baptism took place in the great salon of the Imperial Villa. On September 27, 1896 the newspaper reported on the condition of Marie Valerie and the little Archduchess. On 30 September was first called the name of Hedwig. On 2 October, published a final medical report.[1] Marie Valerie later called Hedwig in her diary that which the certain spark of the Bavarian ducal blood to have in. Hedwig's kindergarten teacher was Elsa Köhler. Marie Valerie overwrote her daughter Hedwig in 1917, the hunting lodge Kühtai as a wedding gift. This castle was acquired in 1893 by Emperor Franz Joseph and his youngest daughter had been bequeathed. Hedwig married on 24 April 1918 on his parents' castle Wallsee Count Bernhard of Stolberg-Stolberg (1881–1952), a son of Count Leopold of Stolberg-Stolberg and of the bourgeois American Mary Eddington. They had had nine children. 1949 requested Hedwig (Countess) Stolberg-Stolberg, as the marriage was called for, one ERP loan to build a ski lift next to their property. The then Ministry of Trade and Reconstruction, Ernst Kolb, refused on the grounds of these unprofitable. Three years later revitalized Hedwig's son Karl, the castle and redesigned it to a Castle. This ski resort Kühtai was taken as the basis for what's highest ski resort in Austria is regarded as today. Hedwig died in 1970 with 74 years in Hall, Tyrol. She is buried in the family vault in the cemetery Hall.

References[edit]