Archelais

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Archelaïs was a town in the Roman province of Palaestina Prima, corresponding to modern Khirbet el-Beiyudat also known as Khirbet al-Bayudat. It was founded by Herod the Great's son Archelaus to house workers for his date plantation in the Jericho area.[1] It is represented on the Madaba mosaic map with a towered entrance flanked by two other towers.[2]

In Christian times, the town became a bishopric. The names of two of its bishops: Timotheus, who took part in two anti-Eutyches synods held in Constantinople in 448 and 449, and Antiochus, who was at the Council of Chalcedon in 451.[3][4]

No longer a residential bishopric, Archelaïs is today listed by the Catholic Church as a titular see.[5]

Inscriptions on the floor of a church discovered among the ruins of the town indicate that it was paved with Byzantine mosaics during the 560s.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ William Smith, Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, I, 193
  2. ^ "Archelais - (Kh. al-Bayudat)" (Franciscan Cyberspot)
  3. ^ Michel Lequien, Oriens christianus in quatuor Patriarchatus digestus, Paris 1740, Vol. III, coll. 673-676
  4. ^ Pius Bonifacius Gams, Series episcoporum Ecclesiae Catholicae, Leipzig 1931, p. 453
  5. ^ Annuario Pontificio 2013 (Libreria Editrice Vaticana 2013 ISBN 978-88-209-9070-1), p. 837
  6. ^ H. Hizmi, "The Byzantine Church at Khirbet el-Beiyudat", in Christian Archaeology in the Holy Land. New Discoveries. Essays in Honour of Virgilio C. Corbo ofm (SBF Collectio Maior 36), Edd. G. C. Bottini - L. Di Segni - E. Alliata, Jerusalem 1990 – cited in "Archelais - (Kh. al-Bayudat)" (Franciscan Cyberspot)