Archie D'Souza

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Archie D’Souza (1942–2006)[1] was 18 years old when he decided that he wanted to become a priest. He received his religious training at the Christ the King Seminary (Pakistan) and was ordained a priest of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Karachi at St. Patrick's Cathedral in 1968.

He pursued a B.A. in Islamic studies at Jamia Millia, Karachi, obtaining his degree in 1969 and went on to do an M.A. in Islamic Theology from the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, and later a Ph.D. in Islamic Theology at the Gregorian University, Rome, in 1976.

In Rome he also studied Arabic, French and Italian, and he was able to read the Qur'an in Arabic. He also was fluent in Spanish.[2]

Fr. Archie also ran the Rabita Centre for Christian-Muslim dialogue at in Karachi. He was also a lecturer in Christian philosophy at the Aga Khan Academy, Karachi from 1976 to 1980, Professor of Islamic studies at the Propaganda Fides College, Rome and the Dean of studies at Christ the King Seminary, Karachi, from 1982 to 1992. From 1996 to 2002, he was on the editorial board for the weekly Christian Voice.[1]

D’Souza worked tirelessly to promote dialogue between Christians and Muslims in Pakistan. This focus began when a change in the Vatican's policy in the early 1960s, the Church decided to open its doors to people of other faiths for dialogue, interaction and understanding.[3][4]

The funeral of Fr. Archie D’Souza, parish priest of Our Lady of Fatima Church, Karachi, who expired of heart failure, was held on 1 April 2006. He was buried at the Christian Cemetery Gora Qabaristan on Shahrah-e-Faisal, Karachi.[5]

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