Archon X Prize

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Archon Genomics X PRIZE presented by Express Scripts
Archon X PRIZE logo
Awarded for "build a device and use it to sequence 100 human genomes within 30 days or less, with an accuracy of no more than one error in every 1,000,000 bases sequenced, with sequences accurately covering at least 98% of the genome, and at a recurring cost of no more than US$10,000 per genome"[1]
Country Worldwide
Presented by X PRIZE Foundation
Reward US$10 million[1]
Official website genomics.xprize.org

The Archon Genomics X PRIZE presented by Express Scripts for Genomics, the second X Prize to be offered by the X Prize Foundation, based in Playa Vista, California, was announced on October 4, 2006. The Archon X Prize in genomics began as a joint effort of the X Prize Foundation and the J. Craig Venter Science Foundation.[2][3][4] The J. Craig Venter Science Foundation offered the $500,000 (US) Innovation in Genomics Science and Technology Prize in September 2003 aimed at stimulating development of less expensive and faster sequencing technology. To attract even more resources to this goal, Dr. Venter joined forces with the X Prize Foundation, wrapping his competition and prize purse into a later incarnation, The Archon Genomics X Prize presented by Express Scripts. The competition was canceled on August 22, 2013, because it was outpaced by innovation.[5]

Overview[edit]

The US$10 million prize was to be awarded to "the first Team that can build a whole human genome sequencing device and use it to sequence 100 human genomes within 30 days or less, with an accuracy of no more than one error in every 1,000,000 bases sequenced, with an accuracy rate of at least 98% of the genome, and at a recurring cost of no more than $10,000 (US) per genome." The $10 million was donated by Canadian geologist and philanthropist Stewart Blusson, who co-discovered the Ekati Diamond Mine. The name "Archon" is the name of Blusson's company, which refers to the type of lithosphere beneath northern Canada. Upon cancellation, the money was returned to the Blussons because no Master Team Agreements were in place.

The 100 human genomes to be sequenced in this competition were donated by 100 centenarians (ages 100 or older) from all over the world, known as the 100 Over 100. Sequencing the genomes of the 100 Over 100 presented an unprecedented opportunity to identify those "rare genes" that protect against diseases, while giving researchers valuable clues to health and longevity. These centenarians’ genes would provide us with a window to the past, significantly impacting the future of healthcare. Although the contest is cancelled, the X PRIZE foundation collected blood samples and created cell-lines to preserve the DNA from more than 100 centenarians. Those genomes are expected to be sequenced nonetheless and put into an open data forum.

The result was going to be the world's first "medical grade” genome, a critically needed clinical standard that would transform genomic research into usable medical information to improve patient diagnosis and treatment. This global competition was expected to inspire breakthrough genome sequencing innovations and technologies that would usher in a new era of personalized medicine.

The competition was officially set to begin on September 5, 2013, and conclude 30 days later on October 5.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "PRIZE Overview". 
  2. ^ Kedes, L.; Campany, G. (2011). "The new date, new format, new goals and new sponsor of the Archon Genomics X PRIZE Competition". Nature Genetics 43 (11): 1055–1058. doi:10.1038/ng.988. PMID 22030612.  edit
  3. ^ Kedes, L.; Liu, E.; Jongeneel, C. V.; Sutton, G. (2011). "Judging the Archon Genomics X PRIZE for whole human genome sequencing". Nature Genetics 43 (3): 175. doi:10.1038/ng0311-175. PMID 21350493.  edit
  4. ^ Kedes, L.; Liu, E. T. (2010). "The Archon Genomics X PRIZE for whole human genome sequencing". Nature Genetics 42 (11): 917–918. doi:10.1038/ng1110-917. PMID 20980980.  edit
  5. ^ [1]