Argentina–Holy See relations

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Argentina-Holy See relations
Map indicating locations of Argentina and Holy See

Argentina

Holy See

Argentina–Holy See relations are foreign relations between Argentina and the Holy See. The current pope, Pope Francis, was the former Archbishop of Buenos Aires.

History[edit]

Argentina, which was a Spanish colony as part of the Viceroyalty of the Río de la Plata, lost its relation with the Holy See during the Argentine War of Independence. Both countries reestablished diplomatic relations on 17 April 1840, during the administration of Juan Manuel de Rosas. Argentina has an embassy to the Holy See, and the Holy See has an embassy in Buenos Aires.

Pope John Paul II made two pastoral visits. The first was in June 1982 where he called for an end to the Falklands War.[1] The second was in April 1987 where he lectured on morality.[2][3]

Vatican officials, including Pope John Paul II and Vatican Secretary of State Cardinal Agostino Casaroli acted as mediators to help resolve Argentina's dispute with Chile over the Beagle Channel. After the two countries almost went to war over the area in 1978, John Paul II became interested in resolving the dispute, which lead to discussions between Chile and Argentina being mediated by the Vatican, and Argentine Foreign Minister Dante Caputo and Chilean Foreign Minister Jaime Del Valle issuing a joint statement of peace and friendship with the intent of developing a final treaty to resolve sovereignty in the channel.[4]

In early 2008, Argentine President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner appointed Alberto Iribarne to be Argentina's ambassador to the Holy See. The Vatican refused to accept him as an ambassador because he was divorced. After ten months of poor relations between the two countries, during which Argentina refused to appoint a new candidate and the Vatican refused to accept Iribarne, Argentina conceded and appointed Juan Pablo Cafiero to the post, which the Vatican quickly ratified. In March 2013, Jorge Mario Bergoglio, Archbishop of Buenos Aires was elected Pope; much to Kirchner's joy and the rest of the Argentine populace.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Pope John Paul II". BBC. 2 April 2005. Retrieved 28 February 2009. The Pope appealed for a peaceful end to the Falklands issue, a plea which was mirrored in a visit to Argentina days later. 
  2. ^ Suro, Roberto (13 April 1987). "Pope Ends his Argentine Visit". New York Times. Retrieved 28 February 2009. Pope John Paul II today opened the holiest week on the Roman Catholic calendar with a spectacular outdoor mass set amid the high-rise buildings of the Argentine capital. 
  3. ^ Schanche, Don A. (7 April 1987). "Pope Opens Visit to Argentina With Lecture on Morality". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 28 February 2009. Pope John Paul II ended an arduous six days in military-ruled Chile on Monday and opened a week's pilgrimage to civilian-governed Argentina by addressing a modest lecture on political morality to the country's leaders. 
  4. ^ Costelloe, Kevin (24 January 1984). "Chile, Argentina agree with pope to end dispute". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. 
  5. ^ Rosemberg, Jaime (27 September 2008). "El Vaticano aceptó a Cafiero como nuevo embajador". La Nación (Argentina). 

External links[edit]