Argentina national rugby union team

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Argentina
Uar rugby logo.png
Union Unión Argentina de Rugby
Nickname(s) Los Pumas
Emblem(s) Jaguar
Coach(es) Daniel Hourcade
Captain(s) Agustín Creevy
Most caps Felipe Contepomi (87) [1][2][3]
Top scorer Felipe Contepomi (651) [4][5][6]
Most tries José María Núñez Piossek (30)
Team kit
Change kit
First international
 Argentina 3 – 28 British Lions United Kingdom
(12 June 1910)
Largest win
 Argentina 152–0 Paraguay 
(1 May 2002)
Largest defeat
 New Zealand 93 – 8 Argentina 
(21 June 1997)
World Cup
Appearances 7/7 (First in 1987)
Best result Third, 2007
"Los Pumas" redirects here. For the Mexican football team, see Club Universidad Nacional.

The Argentina national rugby team, nicknamed Los Pumas, represents Argentina in international rugby union matches. The team, which plays in sky blue and white jerseys, is organised by the Argentine Rugby Union (UAR, from the Spanish: Unión Argentina de Rugby).

Argentina played its first international rugby match in 1910 against a touring British Isles team. As of July 2014 they are ranked 12th in the world by the IRB, making them the highest-ranked nation in the Americas. They have competed at every Rugby World Cup staged since the inaugural tournament of 1987, and the country is undefeated against all but one American nation (Canada), against whom they have suffered three losses.

Although rugby union is nowhere near as popular as football in Argentina, Los Pumas' impressive results since the 1999 World Cup have seen the sport's popularity grow significantly. Argentina has achieved several upset victories, are tough contenders when playing in Buenos Aires, and are fully capable of regularly defeating Six Nations sides. A surprise victory over the hosts France in the first game of the 2007 World Cup took Argentina to fourth in the IRB World Rankings. The team were undefeated in their pool, and reached the semi-finals for the first time, beating Scotland 19–13 in their quarter-final. They were defeated 37–13 by eventual winners South Africa in the semi-finals, but followed this up with a second win over France to claim third place overall.

In March 2008 the team reached an all-time high of third in the IRB World Rankings. In June 2014, the team reached an all-time low of eleventh.

After their advances in competitiveness and performance during the 2000s, coupled with their location in the Southern Hemisphere, Argentina was invited to play in the 2012 The Rugby Championship tournament against the national teams of New Zealand, South Africa and Australia.[7] The team managed only one draw in the 2012 Rugby Championship, but annual exposure to the standards and style of southern hemisphere international rugby is widely expected to see Argentina improve over coming seasons.

History[edit]

Early years[edit]

R. Cooper, former team captain in 1928.
The team that played British Lions when they toured on Argentina in 1927.

The first rugby union match in Argentina was played in 1873, the game having been brought to Argentina by British immigrants. In 1899, four clubs in Argentina's capital, Buenos Aires, joined together to form the River Plate Rugby Football Union. In 1910 a side managed by Oxford University – supposedly the England national team, but including three Scottish players — toured Argentina as part of the celebrations for the 100th anniversary of the Revolución de Mayo: the people of Argentina termed it the "Combined British", also known as "Great Britain XV". Argentina made its international debut against this team under the name "The River Plate Rugby Football Union" on 12 June. The match was played at Belgrano Athletic field and Argentina lost 28–3. The only try for the local team was scored by C.J. McCarthy of Belgrano Athletic. The Argentina line-up was: Saffery, MacCarthy, Gebbie, Bovet, Donnelly, Gribell, Hayman, Heatlie, Henrys, Heriot, Mold, Reid, Sawyer, Watson and Talbot, being all of them descendant of British immigrants.[8][9]

In 1927 the British Isles Lions toured Argentina for second time, with the Lions winning all nine encounters; the tour did however become a financial success for Argentine rugby. Of the nine encounters, four tests were played, which Argentina lost by over 30 points in all. All the games took place in Buenos Aires. The important fact was that all the players on the field were Argentine-born.[9]

Five years passed until another international team would return to Argentina, which would be the Junior Springboks in 1932, playing a two match series. Argentina lost both.

In 1936 the British Isles visited Argentina again, winning all ten of their matches and only conceding nine points in the whole tour. Only one test was played on the tour, with Argentina losing 23–0. The following month Argentina left the country to play their first away tests – against Chile in Valparaiso. Argentina won the first test (and their first game), 29–0. The second match was won by a similar margin. Two years later Argentina hosted Chile, which resulted in Argentina winning by 30 points.

Post war[edit]

Match played between Argentina and France rugby union teams in 1954.

At the first South American tournament, in 1951, Argentina accounted for Uruguay 62–0, Brazil 72–0 and win against Chile by 13-3.

At the second South American tournament, in 1958, Argentina accounted for Uruguay 50–3 and Peru 44–0, And finally Argentina emerged victorious against the hosts Chile in Santiago, by 14–0. In 1959 the Junior Springboks returned to Buenos Aires, winning both fixtures 14–6, and 20–5.

1960s: "Los Pumas"[edit]

Marcelo Pascual diving in the ingoal of Junior Springboaks in 1965.

In 1960, France visited Buenos Aires for a three match series against Argentina. The hosts still could not get their first win over the French, with France winning all three tests 37–3, 12–3 and 29–6. The following year Argentina again showed their dominance on a continental level, winning the South American tournament held in Montevideo, by beating Brazil 60–0, Uruguay 36–3 and Chile 11–3. In 1964 a new version of the South American tournament was played in San Pablo and Argentina again achieved huge victories over Uruguay (25–6), Brazil (30–5) and Chile (30-8)

In the late 1960s the four home unions began tours to Argentina, and after Wales struggled in both Tests in Buenos Aires in 1967 it became clear that Argentina would be a difficult place to win a series. Scotland lost the first test in 1968, but won a close second test two weeks later.

The first trip of the Argentina national rugby team to the other side of the Atlantic was to Rhodesia and South Africa in 1965. The team acquired the nickname "Pumas", from a local journalist after their first tour match, a defeat on 8 May by Rhodesia in Salisbury 17–12. The book "Be Pumas" recalls the Wackley Farmer of Rhodesia magazine commenting on the emblem embroidered on the tourists' jerseys was like a puma – rather than a jaguar. After defeats by Salisbury and Northern Transvaal, the first win came against Western Transvaal, another against South West Africa Country Districts and finally against the Southern Universities. The Pumas scored a landmark win of 11–6 against the Junior Springboks. They were welcomed home to Buenos Aires by a huge crowd; the tour had harvested 11 victories, one draw and four defeats over two months. A match was then organised against the French champions Section Paloise, although the match was remembered for the uproar and misconduct of both teams rather than the Argentine victory. Then Oxford & Cambridge arrived, a team that the Pumas had never beaten. The first match finished level at 19–19 and the second saw the University students triumph 9–3. 1965 ended with a match against Chile, which the Pumas won 23–11.

In 1966, the Gazelles arrived, a kind of a Junior Springboks B team. The visitors took two victories 9–3 and 20–15. In September 1967, Argentina played in Buenos Aires in the South American Championship with victories over Uruguay 38–6 and Chile 18–0. Wales arrived in Buenos Aires in 1968 and for the first time in their history the Pumas were able to triumph in a series, winning the first match 9–5 and drawing the second 9–9. The first great decade in Argentine rugby came to a close with the arrival of Scotland in 1969. The first match saw a big Argentine victory 20–3, but in the second game the visitors narrowly won 6–3.

1970s and 1980s[edit]

The forward line of 1970: García Yáñez, Handley and Foster

Through the 1970s, Argentina confirmed its steady rise towards top-tier status under the influence of its first truly world-class player, fly-half Hugo Porta. During their European tour in 1976, the Pumas came tantalizingly close to a historic victory at Cardiff Arms Park over Wales, then the dominant force in the Northern Hemisphere. Only a Phil Bennett penalty on a foul by Gabriel Travaglini at the death allowed the Welsh to escape with a 20–19 victory. Two years later Argentina returned for their 1978 European tour and held a virtually full-strength England XV to a 13–13 draw before losing 6–19 to Italy. From the late seventies to the early nineties, Argentina never lost the two matches of a series held in Buenos Aires, in a period that included victories against France, England, Australia and a 21–21 tie to the All Blacks, which is probably the most important result ever obtained by the Pumas, thanks to an outstanding performance by Hugo Porta who scored all of Argentina's points.

Late 20th century[edit]

By the time the first Rugby World Cup was held in Australia and New Zealand, in 1987, Argentines were confident their national team would at least make it to quarter-finals. However, an unexpected loss to Fiji prevented the team from clinching the first round. Argentina won their first ever World Cup game when they defeated Italy in Christchurch.

Over the following years, the retirement of many of Argentina's most experienced players, and the defection of many others to professional leagues (rugby union is still an amateur sport in Argentina and UAR's regulations of the time prevented any player who played professionally from playing for the national team) left Argentina with an inexperienced side. This led to disappointing performances in the 1991 and 1995 World Cups, although in the latter Argentina presented a powerful pack which was praised by the international media. Argentina's tighthead prop, Patricio Noriega and hooker, Federico Méndez, went to play in Australia and South Africa respectively after their performance. Noriega even played for the Wallabies.

In 1999, a more experienced and somewhat under-rated Argentina made it to the World Cup quarter-finals for the first time. They had finished second in their group to Wales, and went onto the quarter-final play-offs. After a vibrant 28–24 win against Ireland, they were eliminated by France, 28–47, in the quarter-final. Gonzalo Quesada was the highest overall points scorer in the tournament with 102.

The new millennium[edit]

In April 2000, Marcelo Loffreda was appointed coach of Argentina.

Argentina participated in the 2003 World Cup, but missed out on progressing to the quarter-finals due to a 15–16 loss to Ireland. Because of the fixture list, Argentina had to play four games in a fortnight, whereas Ireland played the same number of games in four weeks.

In 2004 Argentina showed good form, splitting a midyear two-test home series with Wales. Los Pumas handed defending Six Nations champion France a 24–14 loss in November 2004 at Marseille, before losing 21–19 to Ireland on a last-minute drop goal. After returning to Argentina, the Pumas lost 39–7 to the visiting Springboks; however, the Pumas were without 10 regular starters who had returned to their club teams in Europe.

The Pumas during their November 2006 win over England at Twickenham.

Perhaps one of the Pumas' best matches of the decade came on 23 May 2005, when they played the British and Irish Lions in Cardiff before the Lions' tour to New Zealand. The Pumas chose a side of second- and third-choice players as 25 players were unavailable due to club commitments. An inspired Pumas performance, combined with lacklustre play by a mostly second-choice Lions side, put Argentina on the verge of a great upset until a Jonny Wilkinson penalty at the death salvaged a 25–25 draw and the Lions avoided a humiliating defeat. When the Springboks returned to Argentina in November of that year at Vélez Sársfield, they faced a much stronger Pumas side, with most of their European-based players present. The Pumas took a 20–16 lead into the half-time break, before fading the second half and losing 34–23. The following week, the Pumas defeated Scotland 23–19 Murrayfield for the Pumas fifth consecutive win over Scotland since 1990.

In the 2006 mid-year tests, Argentina swept Wales in a two-test tour for their first test series win over Wales. Argentina won the first test 27–25, in the first Argentina test in Patagonia. The second test at Vélez Sársfield saw the Pumas win 45–27, Argentina's largest win ever over Wales. Los Pumas next hosted the All Blacks at Vélez Sársfield. The All Blacks survived a Pumas assault in the final minutes to hang on to win 25–19 and to deny Argentina a huge upset. Argentina then defeated Chile 60–13 in Santiago and defeated Uruguay 26–0 at home to qualify for the 2007 Rugby World Cup. The 2006 end-of-year Tests began with a bang for Los Pumas, as they handed England a 25–18 defeat at Twickenham, resulting in the fans booing the England team off the pitch.[10] Further success followed for the Pumas, defeating Italy in Rome, and coming within one point of beating France in Paris.

The Sunday Times of London reported in February 2007 that the IRB was brokering a deal with SANZAR, the body that organises the Tri Nations, to admit Los Pumas to the competition. However, The Sunday Times indicated that one of the biggest stumbling blocks was the UAR's commitment to amateurism.[11] By August of that year, it became clear that the competition would not be expanded until the key SANZAR media contract with News Corporation expired in 2010. An IRB spokesman noted the contract, Southern Hemisphere fixture congestion, and the lack of a professional structure in Argentina as reasons that Los Pumas could not be admitted any sooner.[12]

2007 Rugby World Cup[edit]

Ignacio Corleto, on his way to score a try against France at the 2007 Rugby World Cup.
Argentinian and Irish fans during the 2007 Rugby World Cup held in France.

Los Pumas began their final preparation for the 2007 Rugby World Cup with a summer two-test series against visiting Ireland, with a 22–20 win at Santa Fe,[13][14] and a 16–0 win at Vélez Sársfield.[15] Los Pumas then completed a clean sweep of their mid-year tests with a 24–6 win over Italy in Mendoza. They split their final warmup tests, defeating Chile 70–14 at CASI in Buenos Aires, before losing to Wales 20–27 at Millennium Stadium.

At the World Cup, Los Pumas were drawn into the so-called pool of death, featuring two other teams ranked in the top six in the IRB rankings—Ireland and the hosts France. On top of this, they opened the World Cup at Stade de France against the French, marking the third consecutive World Cup in which they played against the host nation in the World Cup opener. In possibly one of their finest hours,[16] the Pumas took a 17–9 lead into the half, and held on for a surprising 17–12 win. The Pumas subsequently beat Georgia 33–3 at the Stade de Gerland, Lyon. Argentina then went on to beat Namibia 63–3 in Marseille, the biggest winning margin in Argentine World Cup history. They then went on to secure a 30–15 victory against Ireland, which ensured that Argentina topped the group.

Argentina then defeated Scotland 19–13 in the quarter-final at the Stade de France. The Pumas' improbable run towards the Webb Ellis trophy ended in a comprehensive 37–13 defeat by the Springboks in the semi-final at Stade de France. However, the Pumas recovered to beat France for the second time in the 2007 Rugby World Cup, a 34–10 win in the 3rd/4th place playoff. The 3rd place showing for the Pumas in the 2007 Rugby World Cup was Argentina's best ever result in Rugby World Cup history. Argentina's performance marked the first time that a team from outside the Six Nations or Tri Nations competition reached the semifinals of the Rugby World Cup, and gave renewed momentum propelling Argentina towards joining one of those competitions.

During their World Cup run, the normally football-crazed Argentines embraced the Pumas so much that El Superclásico, the Buenos Aires football derby between Boca Juniors and River Plate was rescheduled so that it would not conflict with the Pumas' quarter-final match.[17] As the only major Spanish language country in the 2007 Rugby World Cup, the Pumas also had considerable support from rugby fans in Spain, Uruguay, and other Latin American countries during their impressive five-game winning streak.

After the 2007 World Cup[edit]

In November 2007, in the wake of Argentina's World Cup run, the future status of Los Pumas was a key topic of discussion at an IRB conference on the future worldwide growth of the sport. The decisions made at the conference regarding Argentina were:[18]

  • Starting in 2008, the Pumas will play more annual Tests, increasing from the previous six Tests per year to nine by 2010.
  • By 2010, the team will play four Tests in the June Test window, three in November, and two during the Six Nations window in February and March.
  • Between 2008 and 2010, Argentina will develop a professional structure within the country, with the goal of having the majority of Argentine professionals playing at home. Sometime around 2012, Los Pumas will then be "fully integrated into the Southern top-flight Rugby playing structure" (read "Tri Nations").

On 7 June 2008, the Pumas beat Scotland in Rosario, Argentina 21–15, thus maintaining their position as the 3rd highest ranked team in the IRB rankings.

In June 2009 the British media reported that Argentina were lobbying for the 2013 British and Irish Lions Tour to Australia to incorporate a series of games in Argentina. The proposed format would be three provincial games in Argentina followed by two international tests, followed by three provincial games in Australia followed by three international tests.[19]

2011 Rugby World Cup[edit]

Los Pumas against New Zealand in RWC 2011

World Cup preparations for Los Pumas began with a drawn 1–1 series against the French Barbarians, a 78–15 win against a South American Invitational XV, and a 21–15 victory against the Aviva Premiership club Worcester Warriors. In their only international test warm-up match, Los Pumas lost 28–13 to Wales in Cardiff.

Los Pumas kicked off their 2011 World Cup with a 13–9 loss against England, a match which they led for over 60 minutes. They next beat Romania 43–8. The following match against Scotland decided which team would reach the quarterfinals. A late try by replacement fullback Lucas González Amorosino and a successful conversion meant Los Pumas won 13–12. Argentina finished the pool stage by winning 25–9 against Georgia.

Argentina's final match of the tournament was the quarterfinal against eventual champions All Blacks. In a surprisingly close first half, Argentina led 7–6 after 30 minutes following a try by Julio Farias Cabello. As the game went on, the All Blacks began to dominate, leading to a final score of 33–10.

While not as glamorous as the 2007 tournament for the Pumas, their campaign was considered relatively successful as they qualified for the quarterfinals from a pool that featured England and Scotland, and put up a valiant quarterfinal display against the All Blacks. It marked the first time that Argentina qualified for the quarterfinals in two consecutive World Cup tournaments.

Santiago Phelan era[edit]

Felipe Contepomi, captain of Los Pumas during the 2011 RWC until 2012.

On March 13, 2008, Phelan was named as the coach of the Argentine rugby union team, filling the vacancy left by Marcelo Loffreda.[20]

Since talking over in 2008, he has rarely earned success. Argentina failed to get a test series victory under Phelan, with a draw against Scotland in 2008 and England in 2009, before losing 2-0 to Scotland in 2010.

In 2012, Argentina again drew a test series against France, then losing 2-0 to England in 2013 including a record 32-3 defeat in the opening test, the biggest losing margin Argentina has had against England on home soil. He did lead Argentina to the occasional "upset", including a 9-6 win over Scotland at Murrayfield Stadium in Edinburgh and a 26-12 win over Wales, who at the time where the Six Nations Grand Slam Champions, at the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff.

He led the Pumas to the 2011 Rugby World Cup knockout stage, but lost to hosts New Zealand in the Quarter Finals, with some promise towards their debut in The Rugby Championship.

2012 saw another major breakthrough for the Pumas, as they joined the The Rugby Championship (formerly known as the Tri Nations) against New Zealand, Australia and South Africa. This was the first time Argentina participated in an annual Tier 1 international competition.

Argentina played its first match of the 2012 Rugby Championship against South Africa in Cape Town on 18 August 2012, losing 27–6. Argentina quickly recovered one week later in Mendoza to achieve a 16–16 score against South Africa, its first draw in history against the Springboks. Argentina acquitted themselves well against Australia, losing 19–23 and then 19–25 to earn a losing bonus point in each match. Argentina also played respectably against the All Blacks in New Zealand, with Argentina keeping the score 5–6 at the half before losing 5–21. Despite ending bottom of the table with just 4 points and no wins in their inaugural season, Argentina proved hard to beat when home.

In the November 2012 test series, Argentina beat Wales at the Millenium Stadium, and lost against France and Ireland also on the road. In June 2013, the team lost both matches against England in Argentina, and beat tier 2 squad Georgia.

In 2013, Argentina began their second tournament with a record breaking 73-13 defeat by South Africa, which was South Africa's biggest winning margin over Argentina.[21] In the reverse fixture at home in round 2, Argentina proved to be a formidable team, but their discipline proved costly with 5 penalties against them, and lost narrowlly to South Africa 17-22.

In round 3 they played New Zealand who was victorious in the match 28-13. In Round 4, they came close to beating Australia in Perth after losing the match 14-13. In the corresponding home fixture, Argentina lost 54-17 to Australia, a record losing margin against Australia at home.[22] It was the second year in a row with Argentina finishing bottom of the table at the Rugby Championship, this time losing all matches.

On October 21, 2013, Phelan stepped down from his post as Los Pumas head coach with immediate effect, one year early from the end of his contract.[23] Over the 45 matches that he coached in his 5-year tenure, he earned 13 wins, 31 defeats and 1 draw.

Daniel Hourcade era[edit]

Daniel Hourcade was hired as new Pumas head coach in October 2013. In November 2013, the Pumas were beaten by England and Wales in Twickenham and Cardiff, and later won against Italy in Rome. In the 2014 mid-year rugby union internationals, Argentina lost their games against Ireland and Scotland.

On 5 October 2014, Los Pumas achieved their first ever win in the Rugby Championship, defeating Australia 21-17 at the Estadio Malvinas Argentinas in Mendoza, their first win over Australia in 17 years. Despite that win, Argentina finished in last place in the Rugby Championship for the third consecutive year.

Colours, symbol and name[edit]

Argentina alternated blue and white jerseys during its first international matches in 1910. In 1927 Mr. Abelardo Gutiérrez of Gimnasia y Esgrima de Buenos Aires proposed that Argentina should play against British Lions in a striped white and light blue jersey. That request was accepted and Argentina wore the striped uniform for the first time in its history.[24]

Los Pumas play in a shirt in the country's flag (and sporting) colours of light blue and white, white shorts, and socks in light blue and white. In 2011, the UAR signed a deal with Nike which became the exclusive kit provider for all its national senior and youth teams, including Pampas XV.[25] The first uniform designed by the American company left the traditional horizontal-striped jersey behind, featuring a single light blue with white shoulders jersey, although it was announced that Los Pumas will wear its traditional uniform again when they play the 2012 Rugby Championship.[26]

On September 1941, Abelardo Gutiérrez (who had proposed the use of a white and blue jersey for the team 14 years prior) suggested a badge with the figure of a lion. The color of the crest was blue (due to Buenos Aires Cricket Club, where the first rugby match in Argentine had been played). The animal was later replaced by a native to Argentine species, so the jaguar was chosen due to his "agility and courage", according to their words.[24]

The Pumas nickname is the result of an error made by Carl Kohler, a journalist for the then Die Transvaler newspaper in South Africa, while following the team during their first overseas tour ever – to Southern Africa in 1965. He tried to devise a catchy nickname for the team similar to existing international team nicknames such as All Blacks, Springboks, and Wallabies. He asked Isak van Heerden, the then coach of the Natal Rugby team who was asked by the SARB to assist with the tour, for ideas. They saw a picture of a type of lion with spots on the UAR crest. Kohler was aware that the Americas had jaguars and pumas, and as he was under pressure to submit his article, made a guess and called them the Pumas, instead of the actual jaguar. The mistake stuck, and was eventually adopted by the Argentines themselves (although the UAR crest still depicts a jaguar).[27]

Uniform evolution[edit]

1910–27 1
1910–27 1
1927–2012
2012–present
Notes:
  • 1 The team alternated white and blue jerseys during that period.

Kit suppliers[edit]

Name Start End
Adidas 1998 Early 2000
Topper Early 2000 2003 Rugby World Cup
Adidas 2004 mid year tests 2011 Rugby World Cup
Nike 2012 mid year tests Current

Home grounds[edit]

Estadio Ciudad de La Plata, the stadium has also hosted a number of rugby matches between Argentina and the New Zealand All Blacks as part of the Rugby Championship, which Argentina joined in 2012.

The Pumas use a variety of stadiums when playing at home. One of the most frequently used for Tests is Vélez Sársfield in Buenos Aires. When Great Britain first came to Argentina in the tour of 1910, the first Argentina Test was played in Buenos Aires. During the mid year Tests in 2007, as well as Vélez Sársfield, Argentina played games at venues including Estadio B.G. Estanislao López in Santa Fe, Estadio Malvinas Argentinas in Mendoza, and Estadio Gigante de Arroyito, in Rosario. Argentina have also used the River Plate Stadium in the past, and in 2006 hosted Wales at Estadio Raúl Conti in Puerto Madryn.

Record[edit]

Overall[edit]

Argentina have won 204 of their 372 Test matches, a win record of 54.84%.[28][29] When the world rankings were introduced by the IRB in October 2003, Argentina were ranked seventh. They fell to eighth in the rankings in June 2004, before rising back to seventh by November that year. They fell back to eighth in February 2005, and stayed there until falling to their lowest ranking of ninth in February 2006. Since then, Argentina rose to eighth in July 2006, then sixth in November of that year. They had a one week fall to seventh, then one week later rose to fifth to start the World Cup 2007.

Los Pumas twice surpassed their highest ranking at the 2007 Rugby World Cup.[30] Defeating number three France, the first opening game loss for a World Cup hosting nation, moved them into fourth place, their highest position since the IRB World Rankings were established. They lost to eventual champions South Africa in the semi-final but beat France yet again in the bronze medal round to set another highest ranking, third, behind South Africa and New Zealand.

Argentina has won every match against South American national teams, including 31 against Uruguay, 28 against Chile, 16 against Paraguay and 11 against Brazil. In contrast, they have never beaten New Zealand or South Africa, having scored a draw each.

Below is table of the representative rugby matches played by a Australia national XV at test level up until 5 October 2014:[28]

Top 25 Rankings as 20 October 2014[31]
Rank Change* Team Points
1 Steady  New Zealand 93.15
2 Steady  South Africa 90.41
3 Steady  England 85.68
4 Steady  Australia 84.53
5 Steady  Ireland 83.44
6 Steady  Wales 80.70
7 Steady  France 80.01
8 Steady  Scotland 77.75
9 Steady  Samoa 76.35
10 Steady  Argentina 75.97
11 Steady  Japan 75.63
12 Steady  Fiji 74.58
13 Steady  Tonga 72.83
14 Steady  Italy 70.92
15 Steady  Georgia 70.46
16 Steady  Romania 68.42
17 Steady  Canada 67.77
18 Steady  United States 67.30
19 Steady  Uruguay 63.58
20 Steady  Russia 62.29
21 Steady  Spain 60.65
22 Steady  Namibia 58.39
23 Steady  Portugal 57.73
24 Steady  Hong Kong 57.63
25 Steady  South Korea 57.22
*Change from the previous week
Argentina's Historical Rankings
Argentina IRB World Rankings.png
Source: IRB - Graph updated to 6 October 2014[31]
Opponent Played Won Lost Drawn Win % For Aga Diff
 Australia 23 5 17 1 21.74% 363 610 -247
 Brazil 13 13 0 0 100% 1054 47 +1007
British and Irish Lions 7 0 6 1 0.00% 31 236 -205
 Canada 9 6 3 0 66.67% 262 137 +125
 Chile 36 36 0 0 100% 1668 230 +1438
 England 19 4 14 1 21.05% 282 488 -206
 Fiji 4 3 1 0 75.00% 130 96 +34
 France 47 12 34 1 25.53% 736 1156 -420
 Georgia 3 3 0 0 100% 87 28 +59
 Ireland 15 5 10 0 33.33% 283 331 -48
 Italy 19 13 5 1 68.42% 476 326 +150
 Japan 5 4 1 0 80.00% 205 139 +66
 Junior Springboks 5 1 4 0 20.00% 26 166 -90
 Namibia 2 2 0 0 100% 130 17 +113
 New Zealand 20 0 19 1 0.00% 260 816 -556
 Oxford and Cambridge 8 2 5 1 25% 48 126 -78
 Paraguay 16 16 0 0 100% 1311 58 +1253
 Peru 1 1 0 0 100% 44 0 +44
 Romania 8 8 0 0 100% 317 97 +220
 Samoa 4 1 3 0 25.00% 82 111 -29
 Scotland 14 9 5 0 64.29% 237 268 -31
 South Africa 19 0 18 1 0.00% 361 728 -367
 South Africa Gazelles 6 2 4 0 33.33% 60 71 -11
 Spain 4 4 0 0 100% 149 75 +74
 United States 8 8 0 0 100% 247 119 +128
 Uruguay 38 38 0 0 100% 1639 370 +1269
 Venezuela 1 1 0 0 100% 147 7 +140
 Wales 15 5 10 0 33.33% 350 428 -78
 World XV 2 2 0 0 100% 64 42 +22
 Zimbabwe 1 0 1 0 0.00% 12 17 -5
Total 372 204 160 8 54.84% 11061 7341 +3720

Rugby World Cup[edit]

Year Round Position Played Won Drew Lost For Against
AustraliaNew Zealand 1987 (16) Pool (13th) 3 1 2 49 90
United KingdomRepublic of IrelandFrance 1991 (16) Pool (14th) 3 3 38 83
South Africa 1995 (16) Pool (13th) 3 3 69 87
Wales 1999 (20) Quarter Final (8th) 5 3 2 137 122
Australia 2003 (20) Pool (9th) 4 2 2 140 57
France 2007 (20) Third-Place 3 7 6 1 209 93
New Zealand 2011 (20) Quarter Final (8th) 5 3 2 100 73
England 2015 (20)
Total 30 15 15 742 605

The Rugby Championship[edit]

Rugby Championship (2012 – )
Nation Games Points Bonus
points
Table
points
Championships
played won drawn lost for against difference
 New Zealand 18 16 1 1 543 272 +271 10 76 3
 South Africa 18 10 1 7 457 336 +121 8 50 0
 Australia 18 7 1 10 349 467 -118 2 32 0
 Argentina 18 1 1 16 273 547 -274 7 13 0

Updated: 5 Oct 2014
Source: espnscrum.com


Players[edit]

Current squad[edit]

Argentina 30-man squad for the 2014 Rugby Championship.[32] In addition to the 30-man squad, a further 9 players has been invited to train with the squad and will act as stand-by players should a call up be necessary.[33] Those players are: Hookers Julián Montoya (Newman) and Santiago Iglesias (Uni. Tucumán), Lock Guido Petti Pagadizabal (San Isidro), Number 8 Benjamín Macome, Scrum-half Felipe Ezcurra (Hindú), Fly-half Patricio Fernández (Jockey Club), Centres Matías Moroni (CUBA) and Javier Rojas (Uni. Tucumán) and Winger Ramiro Moyano (Lince R.C.)

On 15 July, Marcos Ayerza was added to the squad to provide further options in the front row.[34]

On 10 September, Benjamín Macome was promoted to the main squad as cover for Tomás Lavanini, who was unable to play in the fourth round.[35]

Head Coach: Argentina Daniel Hourcade

Caps Updated: 5 October 2014
Note: Flags indicate national union for the club/province as defined by the International Rugby Board.

Player Position Date of Birth (Age) Caps Club/province
Matías Cortese Hooker (1985-10-01) 1 October 1985 (age 29) 11 Argentina Liceo Naval
Agustín Creevy (c) Hooker (1985-03-15) 15 March 1985 (age 29) 34 England Worcester Warriors
Marcos Ayerza Prop (1983-01-12) 12 January 1983 (age 31) 54 England Leicester Tigers
Nahuel Tetaz Chaparro Prop (1989-11-06) 6 November 1989 (age 24) 13 France Lyon
Ramiro Herrera Prop (1989-02-14) 14 February 1989 (age 25) 8 France Castres
Lucas Noguera Paz Prop (1993-05-10) 10 May 1993 (age 21) 7 Argentina Lince
Bruno Postiglioni Prop (1987-04-08) 8 April 1987 (age 27) 16 Argentina La Plata
Matías Alemanno Lock (1991-12-05) 5 December 1991 (age 22) 11 Argentina Tablada
Mariano Galarza Lock (1986-12-11) 11 December 1986 (age 27) 24 England Gloucester
Tomás Lavanini Lock (1993-01-22) 22 January 1993 (age 21) 15 France Racing Métro
Rodrigo Báez Flanker (1989-02-08) 8 February 1989 (age 25) 15 Argentina Liceo Naval
Juan Manuel Leguizamón Flanker (1983-06-06) 6 June 1983 (age 31) 59 France Lyon
Pablo Matera Flanker (1993-07-18) 18 July 1993 (age 21) 13 England Leicester Tigers
Javier Ortega Desio Flanker (1990-06-14) 14 June 1990 (age 24) 9 Argentina Paraná
Tomás de la Vega Flanker (1990-09-28) 28 September 1990 (age 24) 12 Argentina CUBA
Juan Martín Fernández Lobbe Number 8 (1981-11-19) 19 November 1981 (age 32) 61 France Toulon
Benjamín Macome Number 8 (1986-10-01) 1 October 1986 (age 28) 21 France Bayonne
Leonardo Senatore Number 8 (1984-05-13) 13 May 1984 (age 30) 26 England Worcester Warriors
Tomás Cubelli Scrum-half (1989-06-12) 12 June 1989 (age 25) 31 Argentina Belgrano
Martín Landajo Scrum-half (1988-06-14) 14 June 1988 (age 26) 37 Argentina CASI
Santiago González Iglesias Fly-half (1988-06-16) 16 June 1988 (age 26) 10 Argentina Alumni
Nicolás Sánchez Fly-half (1988-10-26) 26 October 1988 (age 25) 27 France Toulon
Marcelo Bosch Centre (1984-01-07) 7 January 1984 (age 30) 31 England Saracens
Jerónimo de la Fuente Centre (1991-02-24) 24 February 1991 (age 23) 8 Argentina Duendes
Matías Orlando Centre (1991-11-14) 14 November 1991 (age 22) 9 Argentina Huirapuca
Horacio Agulla Wing (1984-10-22) 22 October 1984 (age 29) 56 England Bath
Lucas González Amorosino Wing (1985-11-02) 2 November 1985 (age 28) 38 Wales Cardiff Blues
Juan Imhoff Wing (1988-05-11) 11 May 1988 (age 26) 24 France Racing Métro
Manuel Montero Wing (1991-11-20) 20 November 1991 (age 22) 17 Argentina Pucará
Santiago Cordero Fullback (1993-12-06) 6 December 1993 (age 20) 7 Argentina Regatas
Juan Martín Hernández Fullback (1982-08-07) 7 August 1982 (age 32) 49 France Toulon
Joaquín Tuculet Fullback (1989-08-08) 8 August 1989 (age 25) 17 Unattached

Coaches[edit]

Coaches:[36]

  • 1932: Edmundo Cundo Stanfield
  • 1936: Luis Cilley, Edmundo Stanfield and C. Huntley Robertson.
  • 1954: Juan C. Wells.
  • 1956: Dermot Cavanagh and Horacio Savino.
  • 1959: Jorge Merelle.
  • 1960: Saturnino Racimo.
  • 1965: Izaak Van Heerden, Alberto Camardón and Ángel Guastella.
  • 1965–66: Alberto Camardón and Ángel Guastella.
  • 1967–70: Alberto Camardón, Ángel Guastella and Jorge Merelle.
  • 1971: Ángel Guastella and Eduardo Poggi.
  • 1972–73: Ángel Guastella, Eduardo Poggi and Oscar Martínez Basante.
  • 1974: Carlos Villegas, Emilio Perasso and Jorge Merelle.
  • 1975: Eduardo Poggi and Eduardo Scahrenberg.
  • 1976–77: Carlos Villegas and Emilio Perasso.
  • 1978: Ángel Guastella, Aitor Otaño and José L. Imhoff.
  • 1979–80: Luis Gradín and Aitor Otaño.
  • 1981–83: Rodolfo O'Reilly.
  • 1984: Héctor Silva and Aitor Otaño.
  • 1985–86: Héctor Silva, Aitor Otaño and Ángel Guastella.
  • 1987: Héctor Silva and Ángel Guastella.
  • 1988–90: Rodolfo O'Reilly and Raúl Sanz.
  • 1990–91: Luis Gradín and Guillermo Lamarca.
  • 1992: Luis Gradín and John Hart.
  • 1993–94: Héctor Méndez and José J. Fernández.
  • 1995: Alejandro Petra and Ricardo Paganini.
  • 1995: Alejandro Petra and Emilio Perasso.
  • 1996: José L. Imhoff, José J. Fernández, Héctor Méndez and Alex Wyllie.
  • 1997: José Luis Imhoff, Héctor Méndez and Alex Wyllie.
  • 1998: José Luis Imhoff and Alex Wyllie.
  • 1999: José Luis Imhoff and Alex Wyllie, next Héctor Méndez and Wyllie, next Wyllie alone.
  • 2000–2007 : Marcelo Loffreda and Daniel Baetti.
  • 2008–13: Santiago Phelan and Fabián Turnes[37]
  • 2013–: Daniel Hourcade

After Marcelo Loffreda left following the 2007 Rugby World Cup, the UAR spent nearly five months searching for a successor until opting for a two-coach setup, with former Pumas Santiago Phelan and Fabián Turnes taking over.[37] On 22 October 2013, Phelan resigned from his post, ending a five-year spell in charge 2 week before Argentina goes on tour as part of the 2013 end-of-year rugby union tests. On 23 October 2013, Argentina Jaguars and Pampas XV head coach Daniel Hourcade was named the new Head Coach and his current contract will run through until the 2015 Rugby World Cup.[38]

Individual all-time records[edit]

Most matches[edit]

# Player Pos Tenure Mat Start Sub Pts Tries Conv Pens Drop Won Lost Draw %
1 Felipe Contepomi Centre 1998–2013 87 75 12 651 16 74 139 2 42 45 0 48.27
2 Lisandro Arbizu Centre 1990–2005 86 83 3 188 17 14 14 11 41 44 1 48.25
Rolando Martín Flanker 1994–2003 86 77 9 90 18 0 0 0 44 41 1 51.74
4. Mario Ledesma Hooker 1996–2011 84 67 17 15 3 0 0 0 42 41 1 50.59
5. Pedro Sporleder Lock 1990–2003 78 72 6 70 14 0 0 0 41 36 1 53.20
6. Federico Méndez Hooker 1990–2004 73 67 6 70 14 0 0 0 33 40 0 45.20
7. Agustín Pichot Scrum-half 1995–2007 71 69 2 60 12 0 0 0 34 36 1 48.59
8. Ignacio Fernández Lobbe Lock 1996–2008 65 60 5 30 6 0 0 0 33 32 0 50.76
Omar Hasan Prop 1995–2007 65 48 17 20 4 0 0 0 34 30 1 53.07
10. Diego Cuesta Silva Centre 1983–95 63 63 0 125 28 0 0 0 31 30 2 50.79

Last updated: Italy vs Argentina, 23 November 2013. Statistics include officially capped matches only. [39]

Most tries[edit]

# Player Pos Span Mat Start Sub Pts Tries Conv Pens Drop
1. José Núñez Piossek Wing 2001–08 28 26 2 145 29 0 0 0
2. Diego Cuesta Silva Centre 1983–95 63 63 0 125 28 0 0 0
3. Gustavo Jorge Wing 1989–94 23 22 1 111 24 0 0 0
4. Rolando Martín Flanker 1994–2003 86 77 9 90 18 0 0 0
Facundo Soler Wing 1996–2002 25 23 2 90 18 0 0 0
6. Lisandro Arbizu Centre 1990–2005 86 83 3 188 17 14 14 11
Hernán Senillosa Wing 2002–07 33 22 11 128 17 17 2 1
8. Felipe Contepomi Centre 1998–2013 87 75 12 651 16 74 139 2
9. 7 players on 14 tries

Last updated: Italy vs Argentina, 23 November 2013. Statistics include officially capped matches only. [39]

Most points[edit]

Argentina's all-time leading points scorer Felipe Contepomi (651).
# Player Pos Span Mat Start Sub Pts Tries Conv Pens Drop
1 Felipe Contepomi Centre 1998–2013 87 75 12 651 16 74 139 2
2 Hugo Porta Fly-half 1971–90 58 58 0 590 11 84 101 26
3 Gonzalo Quesada Fly-half 1996–2003 38 30 8 486 4 68 103 7
4 Santiago Mesón Fullback 1987–97 34 32 2 365 8 68 63 1
5 Federico Todeschini Fly-half 1998–2008 21 16 5 256 4 37 54 0
6 Lisandro Arbizu Centre 1990–2005 86 83 3 188 17 14 14 11
7 Juan Fernández Miranda Fly-half 1997–2007 29 17 12 158 5 41 12 5
8 José Núñez Piossek Wing 2001–08 28 26 2 145 29 0 0 0
9 José Cilley Fly-half 1994–2002 15 11 4 138 2 31 22 0
10 José Luna Wing 1995–97 8 8 0 129 4 26 19 0

Last updated: Italy vs Argentina, 23 November 2013. Statistics include officially capped matches only. [39]

Most points in a match[edit]

# Player Pos Pts Tries Conv Pens Drop Opposition Venue Date
1. Eduardo Morgan Wing 50 6 13 0 0  Paraguay Brazil São Paulo 14/10/1973
2. José Núñez Piossek Wing 45 9 0 0 0  Paraguay Uruguay Montevideo 27/04/2003
3. Gustavo Jorge Wing 40 8 0 0 0  Brazil Brazil São Paulo 02/10/1993
4. Martín Sansot Fullback 36 3 6 4 0  Brazil Argentina Tucumán 13/07/1996
5. José Cilley Fly-half 32 0 16 0 0  Paraguay Argentina Mendoza 01/05/2002
6. Eduardo Morgan Wing 31 3 5 3 0  Uruguay Brazil São Paulo 16/10/1973
Eduardo de Forteza Fly-half 31 0 11 3 0  Paraguay Paraguay Asunción 25/09/1975
José Luna Wing 31 1 4 6 0  Romania Argentina Buenos Aires 14/10/1995
Felipe Contepomi Fly-half 31 2 3 5 0  France Argentina Buenos Aires 26/06/2010
10. 4 players on 30 points

Last updated: Italy vs Argentina, 23 November 2013. Statistics include officially capped matches only. [39]

Most tries in a match[edit]

# Player Pos Pts Tries Conv Pens Drop Opposition Venue Date
1. José Núñez Piossek Wing 45 9 0 0 0  Paraguay Uruguay Montevideo 27/04/2003
2. Gustavo Jorge Wing 40 8 0 0 0  Brazil Brazil São Paulo 02/10/1993
3. Uriel O'Farrell Wing 21 7 0 0 0  Uruguay Argentina Buenos Aires 09/09/1951
4. Uriel O'Farrell Wing 18 6 0 0 0  Brazil Argentina Buenos Aires 13/09/1951
Eduardo Morgan Wing 50 6 13 0 0  Paraguay Brazil São Paulo 14/10/1973
Gustavo Jorge Wing 24 6 0 0 0  Brazil Uruguay Montevideo 08/10/1989
Facundo Barrea Wing 30 6 0 0 0  Brazil Chile Santiago 23/05/2012
5 5 players on 5 tries

Last updated: Italy vs Argentina, 23 November 2013. Statistics include officially capped matches only. [39]

Most matches as captain[edit]

# Player Pos Span Mat Won Lost Draw % Pts Tries Conv Pens Drop
1. Lisandro Arbizu Centre 1992–2003 48 28 20 0 58.33 87 10 8 4 3
2. Hugo Porta Fly-half 1977–90 38 15 18 5 46.05 435 2 68 77 20
3. Agustín Pichot Scrum-half 2000–07 30 18 12 0 60.00 5 1 0 0 0
4. Felipe Contepomi Centre 2007–13 25 10 15 0 40.00 232 5 21 54 1
5. Juan Martín Fernández Lobbe Number 8 2008– 20 4 15 1 22.50 10 2 0 0 0
Pedro Sporleder Lock 1996–99 20 9 10 1 47.50 20 4 0 0 0
7. Héctor Silva Flanker 1967–71 15 12 2 1 83.33 12 4 0 0 0
8. Sebastián Salvat Centre 1995 13 7 6 0 53.84 35 7 0 0 0
9. Marcelo Loffreda Centre 1989–94 12 7 5 0 58.33 9 2 0 0 0
10. Aitor Otaño Lock 1964–66 10 5 4 1 55.00 12 4 0 0 0

Last updated: Italy vs Argentina, 23 November 2013. Statistics include officially capped matches only. [39]

Youngest players[edit]

# Player Pos Age Opposition Venue Date
1. Gustavo Jorge Wing 17 years and 349 days  Brazil Uruguay Montevideo 08/10/1989
2. Federico Méndez Prop 18 years and 86 days  Ireland Republic of Ireland Lansdowne Road 27/10/1990
3. Patricio Fernández Fly-half 18 years and 202 days  Chile Uruguay Montevideo 01/05/2013
4. Alejandro Iachetti Lock 18 years and 319 days  Uruguay Paraguay Asunción 21/09/1975
5. Eliseo Branca Lock 19 years and 26 days  Wales XV Wales Cardiff 16/10/1976
6. Lisandro Arbizu (Fly-half) 19 years and 28 days  Ireland Republic of Ireland Lansdowne Road 27/10/1990
7. Santiago Álvarez (Centre) 19 years and 69 days  Uruguay Uruguay Montevideo 27/04/2013
8. German Schultz Wing 19 years and 81 days  Uruguay Uruguay Montevideo 27/04/2013
9. Pablo Camerlinckx Number 8 19 years and 146 days  Brazil Uruguay Montevideo 08/10/1989
10. Marcelo Loffreda Centre 19 years and 150 days  England XV England Twickenham 14/10/1978

Last updated: Italy vs Argentina, 23 November 2013. Statistics include officially capped matches only. [39]

Oldest players[edit]

# Player Pos Age Opposition Venue Date
1. Hugo Porta Fly-half 39 years and 60 days  Scotland Scotland Murrayfield 10/11/1990
2. Mario Ledesma Hooker 38 years and 145 days  New Zealand New Zealand Auckland 09/10/2011
3. Fairy Heatlie Number 8 38 years and 48 days United Kingdom Britain XV Argentina Flores 12/06/1910
4. Omar Hasan Prop 36 years and 181 days  France France Parc des Princes 19/10/2007
5. Felipe Contepomi Centre 36 years and 46 days  Australia Argentina Rosario 05/10/2013
6. Martín Scelzo (Prop) 35 years and 246 days  New Zealand New Zealand Auckland 09/10/2011
7. Rodrigo Roncero Prop 35 years and 233 days  Australia Argentina Rosario 06/10/2012
8. Marcelo Loffreda Centre 35 years and 151 days  South Africa South Africa Johannesburg 15/10/1994
9. Julio Farías Cabello Flanker 35 years and 65 days  Italy Italy Rome 23/11/2013
10. Rolando Martín Flanker 35 years and 33 days  Ireland Australia Adelaide 26/10/2003

Last updated: Italy vs Argentina, 23 November 2013. Statistics include officially capped matches only. [39]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Felipe Contepomi será el Puma récord en Rosario" at CanchaLlena.com, 1 October 2013
  2. ^ "La despedida de un símbolo" at Clarín, 6 October 2013
  3. ^ "Contepomi to set record, Pumas chase historic win" at UltimateRugby.com
  4. ^ "Contepomi ya sabe lo que significa ser Puma récord", Clarín, 29 Sep 2013
  5. ^ "Contepomi superó a Porta y es el goleador récord", Clarín, 9 June 2012
  6. ^ "Contepomi, goleador histórico Puma", ESPN, 9 June 2012
  7. ^ "SANZAR invites Argentina to join the Tri Nations from 2012" (Press release). All Blacks. 14 September 2009. Retrieved 2012-08-12. 
  8. ^ "El centenario del debut", Clarín, 13 June 2010
  9. ^ a b "De festejo también, pero por el Centenario" by Jorge Búsico, La Nación, 27 May 2010
  10. ^ "England 18–25 Argentina". BBC. 11 November 2006. Retrieved 2 June 2007. 
  11. ^ Cain, Nick (25 February 2007). "Ambitious Argentina poised to secure TriNations place". The Sunday Times (London). Retrieved 26 February 2007. 
  12. ^ "Pumas will stay crouched until 2010". RugbyRugby.com. 13 August 2007. Archived from the original on 14 October 2007. Retrieved 11 October 2007. 
  13. ^ "First Test Preview: Argentina v Ireland". Irish Rugby Football Union. 25 May 2007. Archived from the original on 29 September 2007. Retrieved 26 May 2007. 
  14. ^ "Argentina 22–20 Ireland". BBC. 26 May 2007. Retrieved 26 May 2007. 
  15. ^ "Argentina 16–0 Ireland". BBC. 2 June 2007. Archived from the original on 5 July 2007. Retrieved 2 June 2007. 
  16. ^ "Coach asks Argentina to stay calm". BBC Sport. 8 September 2007. Retrieved 8 September 2007. 
  17. ^ PA Sport (9 October 2007). "Contepomi's field of dreams". Sportal.co.nz. Archived from the original on 11 October 2007. Retrieved 9 October 2007. 
  18. ^ "Rugby lays foundations for continued growth" (Press release). International Rugby Board. 30 November 2007. Archived from the original on 2 December 2007. Retrieved 3 December 2007. 
  19. ^ Gallagher, Brendan (13 June 2009). "Lions 2009: Argentina look for future tour While the British and Irish Lions play in front of apathetic half-empty stadiums in South Africa, Argentina look on with growing frustration and anger.". The Daily Telegraph (London). Retrieved 27 April 2010. 
  20. ^ "Phelan named new Argentina coach". BBC News. 13 March 2008. 
  21. ^ Springboks power to record victory over Pumas
  22. ^ Wallabies humble Pumas in Rosario
  23. ^ Phelan resigns after five years
  24. ^ a b "La pasión cumple 100 años", La Nación, 10 April 1999
  25. ^ "El pase del verano: Los Pumas dejan Adidas para vestirse con Nike", El Cronista, 27 November 2011
  26. ^ "Nike presenta su camiseta de Los Pumas", Prematch website
  27. ^ Davies, Sean (26 July 2007). "Puma power: Argentinian rugby". bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 8 October 2007. 
  28. ^ a b "Argentina > Head to Head Table". rugbydata.com. Archived from the original on 27 September 2007. Retrieved 29 August 2007. 
  29. ^ Record excludes match against the Barbarians as this was not a representative side.
  30. ^ Ranking archives can be found at the IRB website; www.irb.com
  31. ^ a b "World Rankings". International Rugby Board. Retrieved 14 July 2014. 
  32. ^ Los Pumas para viajar a Pensacola
  33. ^ Jugadores entrenarán con Los Pumas
  34. ^ Marcos Ayerza se suma al plantel de Los Pumas
  35. ^ Formación de Los Pumas vs Wallabies
  36. ^ (Spanish) UAR. Entrenadores de Los Pumas de todos los Tiempos
  37. ^ a b Iribarren, Ezequiel (21 February 2008). "Le buscaron pareja" (in Spanish). Clarín. Archived from the original on 28 February 2008. Retrieved 22 February 2008. 
  38. ^ Daniel Hourcade, nuevo Head Coach de Los Pumas
  39. ^ a b c d e f g h [1]

External links[edit]