Argentine legislative election, 2013

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Argentine Senate election, 2013
Argentina
2011 ←
27 October 2013 → 2015

24 of 72 seats to the Senate
37 seats needed for a majority
  Majority party Minority party Third party
  M. Pichetto.jpg Gabriela Michetti 2.jpg
Leader Miguel Ángel Pichetto Luis Petcoff Naidenoff Gabriela Michetti
Party FPV-PJ FPCyS PRO
Leader since 2001 2011 2013
Leader's seat Río Negro Formosa City of Buenos Aires
Seats before 43
at stake: 16
21
at stake: 5
none
Seats won 14 3 3
Seats after 40 19 3
Seat change Decrease 3 Decrease 2 Increase 3
Percentage 29.4% 22.7% 17.2%

Senate Majority Leader before election

Miguel Ángel Pichetto
FPV-PJ

Senate Majority Leader

Miguel Ángel Pichetto
FPV-PJ

Argentine Deputies election, 2013
Argentina
2011 ←
27 October 2013 → 2015

127 of 257 seats to the Chamber of Deputies
129 seats needed for a majority
  Majority party Minority party Third party
  Jdominguez.jpg Ricardo Gil Lavedra - Diputados.jpg Sergio Massa.jpg
Leader Julián Domínguez Ricardo Gil Lavedra Sergio Massa
Party FPV-PJ FPCyS FR-PJ
Leader since 2011 2010 2013
Leader's seat Buenos Aires Province City of Buenos Aires Buenos Aires Province
Seats before 132
at stake: 43-47
65
at stake: 40
39
at stake: 25-28 (all diss. Per.)
Seats won 47 36 26
Seats after 132 61 37
Seat change Steady Decrease 4 Decrease 3
Percentage 33.3% 24.7% 24.8%

Chamber of Deputies
Majority Leader before election

Julián Domínguez
FPV-PJ

Chamber of Deputies
Majority Leader

Julián Domínguez
FPV-PJ

Coat of arms of Argentina.svg
This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
Argentina

Legislative elections were held in Argentina on 27 October 2013. Open primary elections (PASO) were previously held on 11 August 2013 to determine eligible party lists for the general election. As in 2011 – when such primaries were held for the first time – each party list had to reach a 1.5% threshold at the provincial level in order to proceed to the 27 October polls.[1]

The elections renewed half of the members of the Chamber of Deputies for the period 2013–2017 and a third of the members of the Senate for the period 2013–2019.[2] Chamber of Deputies (Lower House) elections were held in every district; Senate elections were, in turn, held in the provinces of Chaco, Entre Ríos, Neuquén, Río Negro, Salta, Santiago del Estero, and Tierra del Fuego, as well as in the City of Buenos Aires.[3] Corrientes Province held the only elections for governor in 2013, doing so on 15 September.[4]

These elections included two significant novelties. Following the enactment of a law to that effect in 2012, voluntary suffrage was extended to voters age 16 and 17, which increased eligible voters by 4.5% or about 1.2 million;[5] of this total, approximately 600,000 registered to vote.[6] Argentine voters in 2013 also parted with the traditional election-day seal stamped on National Identity Documents (DNI) by election officials, receiving instead a ballot stub with a bar code and serial number.[7]

Background[edit]

President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner was reelected in 2011, and the Kirchnerist Front for Victory (FpV) rode her coattails in gubernatorial and congressional races alike. Following the elections, however, foreign exchange controls, austerity measures, persistent inflation, and downturns in Brazil, Europe, and other important trade partners, resulted in a sudden downturn and a consequent erosion of the president's popularity.[8] A series of cacerolazos organized by opponents of the government took place during 2012 and 2013 (13S, 8N, 18A, and 8A).

The recession was shorter and shallower than much of the local media had predicted, however;[9] and while the FpV entered the 2013 campaign season with sounder footing on pocketbook issues,[10] they were dogged by ongoing speculation that its caucus sought a two-thirds majority in the Lower House with the goal of amending the Constitution to allow the president to seek a third term.[11] A survey conducted in June 2013 by the consulting firm CEIS gave the Front for Victory (the majority party in Congress, as well as the party in power since 2003) 30.3% in the City of Buenos Aires and 39.7% in the Province of Buenos Aires (the largest electoral district). The right-wing PRO polled at 23.4% and 16.7%, respectively; the Federal Peronists and other PJ party lists opposed to Kirchnerism, 10.3% and 16.7%; the centrist Civic Coalition, 9.2% and 5.0%; and the center-left UCR, 7.4% and 8.0%.[12]

The FpV, moreover, had the advantage of having relatively few Lower House seats at stake in 2013. Congressmen in Argentina serve four-year terms, and gains for the various opposition parties in 2009 meant that 2013 put a disproportionate number of their Lower House seats at stake: while the FpV contested 38 of its 116 Lower House seats, a full 76 of 118 opposition seats were at stake this year (a further 13 seats of the 23 belonging to minor parties allied with the FpV were at stake).[13]

Primaries[edit]

Sergio Massa (5th from right) caps a campaign rally with his fellow Renewal Front candidates. Their party list won in Buenos Aires Province, the nation's largest. The balance of power in Congress was largely unchanged, however, and the Front for Victory maintained their working majority in both houses.

The PASO primaries were held on Sunday, 11 August, amid high turnout consistent with recent past elections and estimated by Interior Minister Florencio Randazzo at over 70%.[14]

The Province of Buenos Aires, the largest electoral district and home to 3 out of 8 Argentines, dominated campaign news much as it has in every mid-term election in recent years. As the party list filing deadline on 22 June drew near, the spotlight focused on the popular mayor of Tigre, Sergio Massa. Massa had been elected mayor on the FpV slate, and had served in a number of high-ranking posts in the administrations of both Cristina Kirchner and her predecessor and husband, the late Néstor Kirchner. His relationship with the Kirchners had been a difficult one, however, and though polling gave him better prospects running for Congress under the FpV party list than on a separate slate,[15] Massa ultimately opted to form his own Frente Renovador (Renewal Front) ticket with the support of the 'Group of 8' Buenos Aires Province Mayors and others, notably former Argentine Industrial Union president José Ignacio de Mendiguren (an ally of Kirchnerism).[16][17]

Massa's decision to run as an opponent deprived the FpV of a key ally and he moved quickly to consolidate the center-right vote in Buenos Aires Province by obtaining the endorsement of the PRO (which ran on the Renewal Front list headed by Massa rather than on its own).[18] Federal Peronist Congressman Francisco de Narváez, who would be in direct competition with the Renewal Front for the province's large center-right Peronist vote, believed that the charismatic Massa was in reality a "trojan horse" for the FpV; Renewal Front congressmen, per his reasoning, would run against Kirchnerism only to vote with them once elected to Congress.[19] The Renewal Front, in any case, ultimately defeated the FpV list headed by Lomas de Zamora Mayor Martín Insaurralde by about 35% to 30%, with the Progressive, Civic and Social Front (FPCyS) list headed by Congressmen Margarita Stolbizer and Ricardo Alfonsín and Congressman de Narváez's Front for Union and Work list receiving about 11% each;[3][20] were this result to be mirrored in October, de Narváez would lose four of eight congressmen he led in 2009 on the successful Unión/PRO list.[21]

The centrist Civic Coalition ARI, for its part, arguably achieved its most significant political victory in four years when Congressman Alfonso Prat-Gay forged the Civic Coalition-led Juntos UNEN (Together They Unite) alliance with UCR Congressional caucus leader Ricardo Gil Lavedra, leftist Proyecto Sur leader Pino Solanas, former Civic Coalition head Elisa Carrió (who left the CC in 2012 following a poor showing in the 2011 pesidential race), and Victoria Donda of the leftist Freemen of the South Movement in January 2013. Prat-Gay was nominated as the lead UNEN candidate for a seat in the Argentine Senate for the City of Buenos Aires (where the alliance was strongest), and Gil Lavedra the lead UNEN candidate for the Lower House; former Economy Minister Martín Lousteau (who fell out with President Fernández de Kirchner after his 2008 dismissal) joined Gil Lavedra and Carrió on the UNEN Lower House list for the city.[22]

The City of Buenos Aires, ruled since 2007 by a PRO mayor, handed the rightist PRO an upset by giving UNEN standard-bearers Prat-Gay and Solanas the two Senate seats (out of three) accorded to the winning list in each district, edging out former Vice-Mayor Gabriela Michetti (who would obtain the third seat) and current City Environment Minister Diego Santilli, and costing FpV Senator Daniel Filmus his own seat.[23] The PRO party list for the city's delegation to the Lower House, headed by Rabbi Sergio Bergman (a member of the Buenos Aires City Legislature) and Bank of the City of Buenos Aires director Federico Sturzenegger, was likewise defeated by the UNEN list headed by Congressmen Gil Lavedra and Carrió.[23][24] The FpV list led by Legislator Juan Cabandié, came in third.[3]

Córdoba Province, where Governor José Manuel de la Sota broke with the president after being elected with her endorsement, is where the acrimony between these Peronist factions was probably most acute.[25][26] De la Sota fielded former Governor Juan Schiaretti as the head of his Lower House party list. Their Union for Córdoba list bested the UCR list headed by Congressman Oscar Aguad, the PRO list headed by former football referee Héctor Baldassi, the FpV list headed by former National University of Córdoba rector Carina Scotto, and the "It's Possible" list headed by former Economy Minister Domingo Cavallo with the support of neighboring San Luis Province Senator Alberto Rodríguez Saá (a Federal Peronist).[27][28] Cavallo, who ran as a conservative and lost much of his political base as economy minister during the 2001 crisis, failed to reach the requisite 1.5% threshold to advance to the 27 October general election.[29]

Santa Fe Province voted in the PASO election amid mourning for the 15 or more fatal victims claimed by the Rosario gas explosion on 6 August.[30] Voters there gave the Progressive, Civic and Social Front list headed by former Governor Hermes Binner a victory over the PRO list headed by comedian Miguel del Sel and the FpV list headed by former Governor Jorge Obeid; the Socialist Party, to which Binner and the current governor, Antonio Bonfatti, belongs, is strongest in this province.[31]

Mendoza Province gave the UCR list headed by former Governor and Vice President Julio Cobos a victory over the FpV list headed by Guaymallén Department Mayor Alejandro Abraham. Cobos is probably best remembered for his surprise, tie-breaking vote in 2008 against a bill raising oilseed export taxes; though not an oilseed-producing province, conservative politics have historically been strong in Mendoza, and Cobos' unexpected axing of the measure was widely supported in his province.[32]

The PASO primaries thus gave congressional candidates on the Front for Victory (FpV) list a much reduced share of the popular vote (around 30%, compared to 57% in 2011), and the FpV led in only 10 of 23 provinces.[3][33] They retained a plurality of the vote, however, and by virtue of having only 37 Lower House seats at stake, will likely increase their parliamentary majority by two.[21] The UCR and FPCyS together totaled around 24%,[3] with the latter likely losing around 5 seats due to the large number of seats at stake.[33] The FpV fared better in most Senate races, losing only in the City of Buenos Aires while winning in Chaco, Entre Ríos, Río Negro, Salta, Santiago del Estero, and Tierra del Fuego Provinces; like in the Lower House races, their popular vote for Senate races fell sharply (from 54% to 34%), but their 8% advantage over the UCR and FPCyS combined and their improved showing in Tierra del Fuego compensated their loss of support elsewhere.[3] The Neuquén People's Movement that has dominated politics in Neuquén Province since the 1960s and caucuses with the FpV in Congress, won in a landslide.[3]

Senate[edit]

e • d Summary of the 11 August 2013 open, simultaneous and obligatory primary elections (PASO) results for the Argentine Senate (8 provinces)
Parties Votes %
Kirchnerists and allies 1,746,625 33.96
Radical Civic Union (UCR), Socialist Party and allies 1,356,419 26.37
Republican Proposal (PRO) and allies 779,404 15.16
Others (incl. Neuquén People's Movement) 494,924 9.62
Left-wing (incl. Workers' Party) 320,208 6.23
Dissident Peronists 213,676 4.15
Against all
Total valid votes 100.00
Invalid votes
Total votes cast
Registered voters

Chamber of Deputies[edit]

e • d Summary of the 11 August 2013 open, simultaneous and obligatory primary elections (PASO) results for the Argentine Chamber of Deputies
Parties Votes %
Kirchnerists and allies 6,799,793 29.65
Dissident Peronists (incl. Renewal Front) 5,903,016 25.74
Radical Civic Union (UCR), Socialist Party and allies 5,460,861 23.81
Republican Proposal (PRO) and allies 1.525.995 6.65
Left-wing (Workers' Left Front, Self-determination and Freedom etc.) 1,243,252 5.42
Others (incl. Neuquén People's Movement) 802,019 3.5
Against all
Total valid votes 100.00
Invalid votes
Total votes cast
Registered voters

Results[edit]

The second and final round, held on 27 October, closely mirrored the 11 August results. The Renewal Front (center/center-right Peronists) received a plurality of votes in Buenos Aires Province (the nation's largest),[34] while the Front for Victory (left-wing Peronists) and allies maintained their majority in both houses of Congress with minimal changes in the party composition of either chamber.[35] Turnout was high, and was estimated to have reached 76%.[35]

Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, serving a second presidency, is constitutionally barred from standing in the 2015 election, and the Front for Victory lacks the special two-thirds majority needed for a constitutional amendment. The support for Front for Victory dropped from 54% in 2011 to 33% in 2013. The government faces increasing popular discontent, and the vice-president Amado Boudou (currently acting as president while Fernández de Kirchner recuperates after surgery) is under investigation for the so-called Boudougate. Analysts for the BBC consider the poll results suggest Sergio Massa, Mauricio Macri and Daniel Scioli are likely candidates for the presidency in 2015.[36]

Senate[edit]

Party Votes % Seats
Front for Victory 1,608,666 32.13 11
Republican Proposal 712,395 14.23 2
UNEN 502,554 10.04 1
Civic Front for Santiago 218,965 4.37 2
Radical Civic Union 212,322 4.24 0
Union for Chaco 209,212 4.18 1
Union for Entre Rios 199,934 3.99 1
Workers' Party 158,539 3.17 0
Salteño People's Front 150,745 3.01 1
We are all Salta 140,329 2.80 0
Neuquén People's Movement 139,366 2.78 2
People's Front 129,454 2.59 1
Workers' Left Front 117,148 2.34 0
Progressive Front 90,283 1.80 1
Progressive, Civic and Social Front 63,824 1.27 0
People's Way 46,638 0.93 0
Self-determination and Freedom 46,608 0.93 0
Broad Progressive Front 41,605 0.83 0
Salta Renewal Party 41,289 0.82 0
Neuquino Civic Compromise 38,568 0.77 0
New Left 22,516 0.45 0
Freemen of the South Movement 16,894 0.34 0
People's Union 15,759 0.31 0
Fueguino People's Movement 15,555 0.31 1
Left for a Socialist Option 12,292 0.25 0
Union of Neuquinos 11,244 0.22 0
People's Party 10,448 0.21 0
South Progressive Front 10,139 0.20 0
Federal Union 9,589 0.19 0
Others 14,243 0.28 0
Invalid/blank votes 299,899
Total 5,307,022 100 24
Registered voters/turnout 6,908,999 76.81
Source: Government of Argentina

Chamber of Deputies[edit]

Party Votes % Seats
Won Total
Front for Victory 6,648,451 29.43 40
Renewal Front 3,776,898 16.72 16
Progressive, Civic and Social Front 1,990,689 8.81 9
Radical Civic Union 1,350,940 5.98 8
Workers' Left Front 950,600 4.21 2 3
Union Pro 901,986 3.99 6
UNEN 581,096 2.57 5
Union for Córdoba 515,848 2.28 3 3
Union Pro Santa Fe Federal 504,681 2.23 3
United for Freedom and Work 469,336 2.08 2 3
Civic Front for Santiago 336,065 1.49 3
Social and Civic Agreement 304,521 1.35 2
Encuentro por Corrientes 260,770 1.15 2
Federal Commitment 255,918 1.13 3
Front for the Renewal of Concord 251,617 1.11 2
Justicialist Party 223,243 0.99 2
Union for Chaco 213,128 0.94 1
Workers' Party 204,057 0.90 1
Union for Entre Rios 180,286 0.80 1
Chubut Action Party 151,445 0.67 2
Union con Fe 137,216 0.61 0
Neuquén People's Movement 132,217 0.59 2 3
Salta People's Front 127,179 0.56 1
Front of Jujuy 124,421 0.55 2
We are all Salta 112,262 0.50 0
Vecinalismo Independiente 89,413 0.40 0
Formosan Broad Front 89,164 0.39 1
Riojan Civic Front 84,902 0.38 1
United Front 84,811 0.38 0
Progressive Front 82,960 0.37 0
Civic and Social Front 77,886 0.34 2
Republican Force 72,110 0.32 0
FREPAM 69,422 0.31 1
Self-determination and Freedom 68,246 0.30 0
Civic Coalition 67,908 0.30 0
Union para Vivir Mejor 66,915 0.30 2
New Left 66,661 0.30 0
People's Change 57,150 0.25 0
Union PD-Pro 51,931 0.23 0
Victory Party 47,211 0.21 0
Broad Progressive Front 44,987 0.20 0
Renewal Crusade 42,629 0.19 0
Encuentro Vecinal Córdoba 41,719 0.18 0
People's Way 41,194 0.18 0
Federal Proposal Front 38,847 0.17 1
Neuquino Civic Commitment 37,927 0.17 0
Salta Renewal Party 37,275 0.17 0
Third Position Front 36,509 0.16 0
Santafesino 100% 34,309 0.15 0
People's Alternative 27,297 0.12 0
Unite! 27,118 0.12 0
Socialist Party 24,846 0.11 0
Workers' Socialist Movement 24,800 0.11 0
Pro Propuesta Republicana 23,795 0.11 0
Independent Justice and Dignity Movement 23,386 0.10 0
Left for a Socialist Option 22,932 0.10 0
FAPCC–ARI 20,374 0.09 0
Freemen of the South Movement 18,302 0.08 0
Plural Front 16,754 0.07 0
Jujuy First Front 16,047 0.07 0
People's Solidarity Movement 15,734 0.07 1
People's Union 15,242 0.07 0
Dignified Citizens' Movement 15,202 0.07 0
Union Pro Front 14,684 0.07 0
Social Pole 13,072 0.06 0
Fueguino People's Movement 12,716 0.06 0
Laborista de la Independencia 12,583 0.06 0
Union de los Neuquinos 11,983 0.05 0
South Progressive Front 10,673 0.05 0
Independent Democratic 10,536 0.05 0
Memoria y Movilizacion Social 9,532 0.04 0
New People 9,174 0.04 0
Humanist Party 8,240 0.04 0
Partido Fe 8,171 0.04 0
Federal Union 7,655 0.03 0
People's Party 7,026 0.03 0
New Federal Pact Front 5,336 0.02 0
People's Front 5,314 0.02 0
Party for a United People 5,053 0.02 0
Socialist Workers' Party 5,031 0.02 0
Democratic Space For Victory 2,846 0.01 0
Gen 1,817 0.01 0
Invalid/blank votes 1,050,889
Total 23,641,116 100 127 257
Registered voters/turnout 30,635,464 77.17
Source: Government of Argentina

By province[edit]

Buenos Aires Province[edit]

Deputies[37]
Parties Front-runner Votes % Seats
Renewal Front (dissident Peronists) Sergio Massa 3,776,898 43.92 16
Front for Victory Martín Insaurralde 2,767,694 32.18 12
Progressive, Civic and Social Front Margarita Stolbizer 1,015,430 11.80 4
United for Liberty and Labour (dissident Peronists) Francisco de Narváez 469,336 5.46 2
Workers' Left Front Néstor Pitrola 433,269 5.04 1
Union with Faith (dissident Peronists) Gerónimo Venegas 137,216 1.60
Against all 273,703 3.06
Total valid votes 100.00 35
Invalid votes 80,326 0.90
Total votes cast
Registered voters

City of Buenos Aires[edit]

Senate[38]
Parties Front-runner Votes % Seats
Union Pro Gabriela Michetti 712,395 39.25 2
UNEN Fernando Pino Solanas 502,554 27.69 1
Front for Victory Daniel Filmus 421,911 23.24
Workers' Left Front Claudio Dellacarbonara 85,142 4.69
Popular Path Claudio Lonzano 46,638 2.56
Self-determination and Freedom Sergio Sallustio 46,608 2.57
Against all 102,977 5.31
Total valid votes 100.00 3
Invalid votes 18.301 0.94
Total votes cast
Registered voters
Deputies[39]
Parties Front-runner Votes % Seats
Union Pro Sergio Bergman 621,167 34.46 5
UNEN Elisa Carrió 581,096 32.23 5
Front for Victory Juan Cabandié 389,128 21.59 3
Workers' Left Front Jorge Altamira 101,862 5.65
Self-determination and Freedom Luis Zamora 68,246 3.79
Popular Path Itai Hagman 41,194 2.28
Against all 111,983 5.79
Total valid votes 100.00 13
Invalid votes 18,279 0.95
Total votes cast
Registered voters

Catamarca[edit]

Deputies[40]
Parties Front-runner Votes % Seats
Progressive, Civic and Social Front Eduardo Brizuela del Moral 77,886 40.01 2
Front for Victory Néstor Tomássi 75,318 38.69 1
Third Position Front Luis Barrionuevo 36,509 18.75 -
Workers' Party Ariel Antonio López 4,960 2.55 -
Against all 10,300 4.97
Total valid votes 100.00 3
Invalid votes 2,141 1.03
Total votes cast
Registered voters

Chaco[edit]

Senate[41]
Parties Front-runner Votes % Seats
Front for Victory Eduardo Alberto Aguilar 363,106 60.60 2
Union for Chaco Ángel Rozas 209,212 34.92 1
Workers' Party Aldo Gabriel García 26,860 4.48
Against all 36,374 5.67
Total valid votes 100.00 3
Invalid votes 337 0.06
Total votes cast
Registered voters
Deputies[42]
Parties Front-runner Votes % Seats
Front for Victory Juan Manuel Pedrini 349,131 59.31 3
Union for Chaco Miguel Tejedor 213,128 36.21 1
Workers' Party Jorge Alberto Esquivel 26,358 4.48 -
Against all 43,177 6.78
Total valid votes 100.00 4
Invalid votes 4,625 0.73
Total votes cast
Registered voters

Chubut[edit]

Deputies[43]
Parties Front-runner Votes % Seats
Chubutense Action Party Mario Das Neves 151,445 52.67 2
Front for Victory Norberto Yauhar 66,830 23.24 -
Radical Civic Union Eduardo Conde 36.617 12.73 -
Senior Social Movement Pole Position Of The People Oscar Petersen 13.072 4.55 -
Socialist Movement Of Workers Susana Muñoz 12.706 4.42 -
Civic Coalition Caelos Reinoso 6.876 2.39 -
Against all 4,597 1.53
Total valid votes 100.00 2
Invalid votes 8,563 2.85
Total votes cast
Registered voters

Córdoba[edit]

Deputies[44]
Parties Front-runner Votes % Seats
Union for Córdoba (dissident Peronists) Juan Schiaretti 515,848 26.54 3
Radical Civic Union Oscar Aguad 440,452 22.66 3
Front for Victory Carolina Scotto 296,449 15.25 2
Unión Pro Héctor Baldassi 280,819 14.45 1
Workers' Left Front Liliana Olivero 145,238 7.48
Independent Localism (Kircherist allies) Olga Riutort 89,413 4.60
Progressive, Civic and Social Front Ernesto Martinez 72,414 3.73
Broad Progressive FrontCivic Coalition ARI Roberto Cucui 61,032 3.14
Local Encounter Córdoba María Rosa Marcone 41.719 2.15
Against all 24,404 1.22
Total valid votes 100.00 9
Invalid votes 35,520 1.77
Total votes cast
Registered voters

Corrientes[edit]

Deputies[45]
Parties Front-runner Votes % Seats
Meeting for Corrientes Gustavo Adolfo Valdés 260,770 46.98 2
Front for Victory Carlos Rubín 237,151 42.72 1
Popular Path Eugenio Artaza 57,150 10.30 -
Against all 8,310 1.45
Total valid votes 100.00 3
Invalid votes 9,900 1.73
Total votes cast
Registered voters

Entre Ríos[edit]

Senate[46]
Parties Front-runner Votes % Seats
Front for Victory Pedro Guastavino 359,522 46.24 2
Union for Entre Ríos (PRO allies) Alfredo De Ángeli 199,934 25.70 1
Radical Civic Union Atilio Benedetti 154,014 19.81
Broad Progressive Front Lisandro Viale 41,605 5.35
New Left Gabriel Geist 22.516 2.90
Against all 11,250 1,40
Total valid votes 100.00 3
Invalid votes 11,839 1,48
Total votes cast
Registered voters
Deputies[47]
Parties Front-runner Votes % Seats
Front for Victory José Eduardo Lauritto 358,626 46.61 3
Union for Entre Ríos Alliance María Cristina Cremer de Busti 180,286 23.43 1
Radical Civic Union Jorge Marcelo D Agostino 162,141 21.06 1
Broad Progressive Front Américo Schvartzman 44,987 5.85 -
New Left Luis Meiners 23.428 3.05
Against all 17,722 2.22
Total valid votes 100.00 5
Invalid votes 10,915 1.37
Total votes cast
Registered voters

Formosa[edit]

Deputies[48]
Parties Front-runner Votes % Seats
Front for Victory Juan Carlos Díaz Roig 146,270 60,11 1
Formoseño Broad Front Ricardo Buryaile 89,164 36.65 1
Workers' Party Fabián Servin 7,887 3.24 -
Against all 7,891 3.10
Total valid votes 100.00 2
Invalid votes 2,844 1.12
Total votes cast
Registered voters

Jujuy[edit]

Deputies[49]
Parties Front-runner Votes % Seats
Jujeño Front Mario Fiad 124,421 40.15 2
Front for Victory Héctor Tentor 120,460 38.87 1
Workers' Left Front Alejandro Vilca 22,272 7.19 -
Front First Jujuy Elva Isolda Calsina 16,047 5.18 -
Front Union Pro Dago Alberto Pubzolu 14,684 4.74 -
New Left Betina Rivero 6.943 2.24
Party for a People United Luciana Santillan 5,053 1.63 -
Against all 34,472 9.84
Total valid votes 100.00 3
Invalid votes 5,286 1.51
Total votes cast
Registered voters

La Pampa[edit]

Deputies[50]
Parties Front-runner Votes % Seats
Justicialist Party Gustavo Fernández Mendía 70,866 35.16 1
Progressive, Civic and Social Front Francisco Torroba 69,422 34.44 1
Federal Proposal Front Carlos Mac Allister 38,847 19.26 1
New People (dissident Peronists) Darío Omar Hernández 9,174 4.55 -
Humanist Party Roberto Costabel 8,240 4.09 -
Socialist Workers Party Claudia Lupardo 5,031 2.05 -
Against all 2,225 1.07
Total valid votes 100.00 3
Invalid votes 4,105 1.97
Total votes cast
Registered voters

La Rioja[edit]

Deputies[51]
Parties Front-runner Votes % Seats
Front for Victory Teresita Madera 85,898 47.05 1
Riojana Civic Force Julio César Martínez 84,902 46.50 1
New Federal Pact Front Jorge Yoma 5,336 2.92
Left for a Socialist Option Horacio Pavon 4,023 2.20
Federal Compromise (dissident Peronists) Carlos Santander 2,424 1.33
Against all 8,183 4.20
Total valid votes 100.00 2
Invalid votes 3,138 1.61
Total votes cast
Registered voters

Mendoza[edit]

Deputies[52]
Parties Front-runner Votes % Seats
Radical Civic Union Julio Cobos 480,658 47.72 3
Front for Victory Alejandro Abraham 273,209 27.13 1
Workers' Left Front Nicolás del Caño 141,284 14.03 1
Union PDPro Luis Rosales 51,931 5.16
Federal Commitment (dissident Peronists) Daniel Cassia 39,714 3.94
Broad Progressive FrontCivic Coalition ARI Alberto Montbrun 20,374 2.02
Against all 19,663 1.88
Total valid votes 100.00 5
Invalid votes 16,730 1.60
Total votes cast
Registered voters

Misiones[edit]

Deputies[53]
Parties Front-runner Votes % Seats
Renewal Front of the Concordance Alex Ziegler 251,617 43.30 2
Radical Civic Union Luis Mario Pastori 155,031 26.68 1
United Front Ramón Puerta 84,811 14.58
Front for Victory Juan Carlos Ríos 64,840 11.16
Socialist Party Norma Ferndandez Flores 24,846 4.28
Against all 9,271 1.55
Total valid votes 100.00 3
Invalid votes 8,932 1.49
Total votes cast
Registered voters

Neuquén[edit]

Senate[54]
Parties Front-runner Votes % Seats
Neuquén People's Movement Guillermo Juan Pereyra 139,366 41.92 2
Front for Victory Marcelo Fuentes 68,461 20.59 1
Neuquén Civic Commitment Marcelo Inaudi 38,568 11.60
Workers' Left Front Patricia Jure 32,006 9,63
Freemen of the South Movement Eduardo Benitez 16,894 5.08
Popular Union (dissident Peronists) Gabriel Romero 15,759 4.74
Union of the Neuquenians Andrea Rosso 11,244 3.38
Southern Progressive Front Priscila Otton 10.139 3.06
Against all 9,438 2,67
Total valid votes 100.00 3
Invalid votes 10.522 2,98
Total votes cast
Registered voters
Deputies[55]
Parties Front-runner Votes % Seats
Neuquén People's Movement María Inés Villar Molina 132,217 40.20 2
Front for Victory Nanci María Agustina Parrilli 69,956 21.27 1
Neuquén Civic Commitment Rubén Etcheverry 37,927 11.53
Workers' Left Front Andrés Blanco 32,599 9,91
Freemen of the South Movement Paula Sanchez 18,302 5.56
Popular Union (dissident Peronists) Graciela Bourdieu 15,242 4.63
Union of the Neuquenians Francisco Baggio 11,983 3.64
Southern Progressive Front Maria Barragan 10.673 3.26
Against all 12,543 3.56
Total valid votes 100.00 3
Invalid votes 10.281 2,92
Total votes cast
Registered voters

Río Negro[edit]

Senate[56]
Parties Front-runner Votes % Seats
Front for Victory Miguel Ángel Pichetto 171,614 49.95 2
Progressive Front Alliance María Magdalena Odarda 90,283 26.28 1
Radical Civic Union Miguel Saiz 54,592 15.89
Workers' Party Norma Dardik 27,066 7.88
Against all 102,337 2.84
Total valid votes 100.00 3
Invalid votes 9,309 2.56
Total votes cast
Registered voters
Deputies[57]
Parties Front-runner Votes % Seats
Front for Victory María Emilia Soria 171,313 50.77 2
Progressive Front Alliance Mario Néstor Álvarez 82,960 24.58 -
Radical Civic Union Yasmin Lopez Asenia 54,214 16.07
Workers' Party Amalia Quintillan 28,936 8.58
Against all 15,480 4.28
Total valid votes 100.00 2
Invalid votes 9,008 2.49
Total votes cast
Registered voters

Salta[edit]

Senate[58]
Parties Front-runner Votes % Seats
Front for Victory Rodolfo Julio Urtubey 178,921 29.05 2
Popular Front of Salta (dissident Peronists) Juan Carlos Romero 150,745 24.48 1
We are all Salta Alfredo Horacio Olmedo 140,329 22.78
Workers' Party Cristina Foffani 104.613 16.99
Reformist Party of Salta Andrés Zottos 41.289 6.70
Against all 12,384 1.94
Total valid votes 100.00 3
Invalid votes 8,668 1.36
Total votes cast
Registered voters
Deputies[59]
Parties Front-runner Votes % Seats
Popular Front of Salta Guillermo Durand Cornejo 127,179 20.57 1
Workers' Party Pablo Sebastián López 118,229 19.11 1
Justicialist Party Evita Nélida Isa 117,895 19.05 1
We are all Salta Bibiana Singh Kaur 112,262 18.14
Victory Party Sergio Leavy 47,211 7.63
Salta Renewal Party Roberto Gramaglia 37,275 6.02
Independent Movement for Justice and Dignity Jose Ibarra 23,386 3.78
Front Plural Carlos Posadas 16,754 2.71
Memory and Social Mobilization Pablo Viel 9,532 1.54
Workers' Socialist Movement Cecilia Gómez 8,996 1.45
Against all 8,649 1.37
Total valid votes 100.00 3
Invalid votes 5,376 0.85
Total votes cast
Registered voters

San Juan[edit]

Deputies[60]
Parties Front-runner Votes % Seats
Front for Victory Héctor Daniel Tomás 223,586 55.36 2
Federal Compromise (PRO allies) Eduardo Augusto Cáceres Giménez 92,268 22.85 1
Renewal Crusade Nancy Avelín 42,629 10.55
Radical Civic Union Hugo Dominguez 18,329 4.54
Dignity Party Citizen Alberto Sanchez 15,202 3.76 -
Left for a Socialist Option Gloria Cimino 6,551 1.62
Front of People Albero Acüero 5,314 1.32 -
Against all 4,145 1,00
Total valid votes 100.00 3
Invalid votes 6,306 1,55
Total votes cast
Registered voters

San Luis[edit]

Deputies[61]
Parties Front-runner Votes % Seats
Federal Compromise (dissident Peronists) Berta Hortensia Arenas 121,512 53.88 2
Progressive, Civic and Social Front José Luis Riccardo 53,153 23.56 1
Front for Victory Cristian Niño 40,340 17.89 -
Independent Democrat Juan Barbeito 10,536 4.67 -
Against all 26,421 10.24
Total valid votes 100.00 3
Invalid votes 5,604 2.17
Total votes cast
Registered voters

Santa Cruz[edit]

Deputies[62]
Parties Front-runner Votes % Seats
Union for a better life Eduardo Raúl Costa 66,915 42.13 2
Front for Victory Mauricio Gómez Bull 39,284 24.74 1
Justicialist Party Nieves Beroiza 31,834 20.04 -
Workers' Party Omar Latini 8,009 11.14
Workers' Socialist Movement Emilio Poliak 3,098 1.95
Against all 1,080 0.66
Total valid votes 100.00 3
Invalid votes 4,165 2.54
Total votes cast
Registered voters

Santa Fe[edit]

Deputies[63]
Parties Front-runner Votes % Seats
Progressive, Civic and Social Front Hermes Binner 786,973 42.37 4
Union Pro Federal Santa Fe Miguel del Sel 504,681 27.17 3
Front for Victory Jorge Obeid 420,476 22.64 2
Workers' Left Front Octavio Crivaro 47,555 2.56
New Left Alejandro Parlante 36,290 1.95
100% Santa Fean (dissident Peronists) Raúl Carignano 34,309 1.85
Unite with Faith for Culture, Education and Labour (dissident Peronists) José Bonacci 27,118 1.46
Against all 33,617 1.74
Total valid votes 100.00 9
Invalid votes 38,549 2.00
Total votes cast
Registered voters

Santiago del Estero[edit]

Senate[64]
Parties Front-runner Votes % Seats
Civic Front for Santiago (Kirchnerists' allies) Daniel Brue 218,965 48,25 2
Popular Front (Kirchnerists' allies) Gerardo Montenegro 129,454 28.53 1
Progressive, Civic and Social Front Emilio Rached 63,824 14.06
Front for Victory Héctor Ruiz 21,248 4.69
Left for a Socialist Option Nicolás Basualdo 12,292 2.71
Party of Faith (dissident Peronists) Antonio Calabrese 8,009 1.76
Against all 29,886 6.12
Total valid votes 100.00 3
Invalid votes 4,151 0.85
Total votes cast
Registered voters
Deputies[65]
Parties Front-runner Votes % Seats
Civic Front for Santiago (Kirchnerists' allies) Cristian Rodolfo Oliva 336,065 76.44 3
Progressive, Civic and Social Front Paola Griggio 63,824 14.06
Front for Victory Marcelo Nazar 20,309 4.62
Left for a Socialist Option Anisa Favoretti 12,358 2.81
Party of Faith (dissident Peronists) Pedro Brue 8,171 1.86
Against all 32,257 6.78
Total valid votes 100.00 3
Invalid votes 3,514 0.74
Total votes cast
Registered voters

Tierra del Fuego[edit]

Senate[66]
Parties Front-runner Votes % Seats
Front for Victory Rosana Bertone 23,883 34.40 2
Tierra del Fuegan Popular Movement Jorge Alberto Garramuño 15,555 22.41 1
People Solidarity Movement (Kirchnerists' allies) Mario Jorge Colazo 10,448 15.05
Federal Union Liliana Fadul 9,589 13.81
Democratic Space for Victory (Kirchnerists' allies) Osvaldo Ramón López 3,847 5.54
Radical Civic Union Ángel Da Fonseca 3,716 5.35
Justicialist Party Patricia Lanzares 2,387 3.44
Against all 11,428 13.52
Total valid votes 100.00 3
Invalid votes 3,492 4.13
Total votes cast
Registered voters
Deputies[67]
Parties Front-runner Votes % Seats
Front for Victory Martín Alejandro Pérez 20,320 27.33 1
People Solidarity Movement Oscar Martínez 15,734 21.16 1
Tierra del Fuegan Popular Movement Juan Matías Loffler 12,716 17.10 -
Federal Union Mario Ferreyra 7,655 10.29 -
Popular Party Edgardo Welsch 7,026 9.45 -
Radical Civic Union Jose Maria Martin 3,598 4.84 -
Democratic Space for Victory Hector Chavez 2,846 3.83 -
Justicialist Party Pablo Miguel Garcia 2,648 3.56
GEN Juan Torres Saltz 1,817 2.44 -
Against all 6,031 7.10
Total valid votes 100.00 2
Invalid votes 4,345 5.12
Total votes cast
Registered voters

Tucumán[edit]

Deputies[68]
Parties Front-runner Votes % Seats
Front for Victory Juan Luis Manzur 411,863 46.87 2
Progressive, Civic and Social Front José Manuel Cano 304,521 34.66 2
Republican Force Ricardo Bussi 72,110 8.21 -
Popular Alternative Gumersindo Parajon 27,297 3.11 -
Workers' Left Front Daniel Blanco 26,521 3.01 -
Pro Republican Proposal Alberto Garmendia 23,795 2.71 -
Labour Independence Bernardo Hamilton 12,583 1.43 -
Against all 7,374 0.82
Total valid votes 100.00 4
Invalid votes 10,641 1.18
Total votes cast
Registered voters

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Las elecciones nacionales del 2013 se realizarán en octubre y las provinciales en noviembre" [The 2013 national elections will be held in October and the provincial ones in November]. El Intransigente (in Spanish). April 5, 2012. 
  2. ^ "Elecciones legislativas 2013 argentina ¿Qué se vota?". Argentina: Información política y electoral. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g "Primarias legislativas. Todos los resultados". Clarín. 
  4. ^ "Cuatro candidatos para el cargo de gobernador de Corrientes". Territorio Digital. July 29, 2013. 
  5. ^ "El padrón electoral aumentará 4,5 por ciento en 2013". Página/12. November 19, 2012. 
  6. ^ "La primera vez del voto joven". InfoNews. July 30, 2013. 
  7. ^ "Chau sello: se entregó un troquel a todos los votantes". Info News. August 11, 2013. 
  8. ^ "Argentina says inflation accelerated as economy cooled". Reuters. 
  9. ^ "La economía argentina está en recesión". Clarín. May 20, 2012. 
  10. ^ "La economía argentina creció en mayo un 7,8% respecto al año pasado". El País. July 18, 2013. 
  11. ^ "Diputados: Cristina necesita repetir la elección de 2011 para asegurarse la reelección". La Política Online. September 9, 2012. 
  12. ^ June 2013 CEIS
  13. ^ "PASO 2013: qué se pone en juego en el Congreso Nacional". InfoNews. August 11, 2013. 
  14. ^ "Randazzo: Participó más del 70 por ciento del padrón". InfoNews. August 11, 2013. 
  15. ^ "Massa, hiperactivo y equilibrista, no define aún su futuro". La Nación. 
  16. ^ "Sergio Massa y su Frente Renovador, un barco al que todos quieren subirse". Política del Sur. 
  17. ^ "Massa juega y suma a De Mendiguren y Tundis en su lista". Clarín. 
  18. ^ "Finalmente, Massa será candidato a diputado en Buenos Aires". La Voz del Interior. June 22, 2013. 
  19. ^ "De Narváez, enojado: Massa es el caballo de Troya de Cristina". Perfil. June 23, 2013. 
  20. ^ "Massa se impone en Buenos Aires, incluido el conurbano". Clarín. August 11, 2013. 
  21. ^ a b "El kirchnerismo mantendrá su posición en el Congreso". InfoNews. August 12, 2013. 
  22. ^ "Prat Gay, Gil Lavedra, Donda y Tumini lanzaron su lista porteña". Clarín. July 2, 2013. 
  23. ^ a b "El PRO fue desbancado en la Ciudad". InfoNews. August 11, 2013. 
  24. ^ "Todos los candidatos y listas completas en dos distritos clave". La Nación. June 26, 2013. 
  25. ^ "La disputa entre De la Sota y Cristina se coló fuerte en el PJ". Puntal. 
  26. ^ "Córdoba’s Free Digital Television (TDA) Antennas Stay Put". The Argentina Independent. February 13, 2013. 
  27. ^ "En Córdoba se impone Schiaretti y el kirchnerismo sale cuarto". Clarín. August 11, 2013. 
  28. ^ "Quedaron definidas las listas en Córdoba". Hoy en la Noticia. June 23, 2013. 
  29. ^ "Cavallo se queda afuera de las elecciones de octubre". InfoNews. August 11, 2013. 
  30. ^ "Rosario death toll rises to 15, six people remain missing". Buenos Aires Herald. August 9, 2013. 
  31. ^ "Santa Fe: triunfa Binner y Del Sel queda en segundo lugar". Clarín. August 11, 2013. 
  32. ^ "Cobos saca más de 15 puntos de ventaja". Clarín. August 11, 2013. 
  33. ^ a b "El Frente para la Victoria retoma el control del Congreso". Elecciones Argentina. October 24, 2011. 
  34. ^ "Massa gana y aumenta su ventaja en la Provincia, y Michetti se impone por amplio margen". Clarín. October 27, 2012. 
  35. ^ a b "El FpV incrementa su mayoría por 5 diputados y sigue siendo la primera fuerza nacional después de 10 años de gobierno". Info News. October 27, 2013. 
  36. ^ "Poll setback for Argentine President Cristina Fernandez". BBC News. October 28, 2013. Retrieved October 31, 2013. 
  37. ^ "Diputados nacionales" [National deputies]. Elecciones Nacionales 2013 (in Spanish). Interior Ministry of Argentina. October 2013. Retrieved October 31, 2013. 
  38. ^ "Senadores nacionales" [National senators]. Elecciones Nacionales 2013 (in Spanish). Interior Ministry of Argentina. October 2013. Retrieved October 31, 2013. 
  39. ^ "Diputados nacionales" [National deputies]. Elecciones Nacionales 2013 (in Spanish). Interior Ministry of Argentina. October 2013. Retrieved October 31, 2013. 
  40. ^ "Diputados nacionales" [National deputies]. Elecciones Nacionales 2013 (in Spanish). Interior Ministry of Argentina. October 2013. Retrieved October 31, 2013. 
  41. ^ "Senadores nacionales" [National senators]. Elecciones Nacionales 2013 (in Spanish). Interior Ministry of Argentina. October 2013. Retrieved October 31, 2013. 
  42. ^ "Diputados nacionales" [National deputies]. Elecciones Nacionales 2013 (in Spanish). Interior Ministry of Argentina. October 2013. Retrieved October 31, 2013. 
  43. ^ "Diputados nacionales" [National deputies]. Elecciones Nacionales 2013 (in Spanish). Interior Ministry of Argentina. October 2013. Retrieved October 31, 2013. 
  44. ^ "Diputados nacionales" [National deputies]. Elecciones Nacionales 2013 (in Spanish). Interior Ministry of Argentina. October 2013. Retrieved October 31, 2013. 
  45. ^ "Diputados nacionales" [National deputies]. Elecciones Nacionales 2013 (in Spanish). Interior Ministry of Argentina. October 2013. Retrieved October 31, 2013. 
  46. ^ "Senadores nacionales" [National senators]. Elecciones Nacionales 2013 (in Spanish). Interior Ministry of Argentina. October 2013. Retrieved October 31, 2013. 
  47. ^ "Diputados nacionales" [National deputies]. Elecciones Nacionales 2013 (in Spanish). Interior Ministry of Argentina. October 2013. Retrieved October 31, 2013. 
  48. ^ "Diputados nacionales" [National deputies]. Elecciones Nacionales 2013 (in Spanish). Interior Ministry of Argentina. October 2013. Retrieved October 31, 2013. 
  49. ^ "Diputados nacionales" [National deputies]. Elecciones Nacionales 2013 (in Spanish). Interior Ministry of Argentina. October 2013. Retrieved October 31, 2013. 
  50. ^ "Diputados nacionales" [National deputies]. Elecciones Nacionales 2013 (in Spanish). Interior Ministry of Argentina. October 2013. Retrieved October 31, 2013. 
  51. ^ "Diputados nacionales" [National deputies]. Elecciones Nacionales 2013 (in Spanish). Interior Ministry of Argentina. October 2013. Retrieved October 31, 2013. 
  52. ^ "Diputados nacionales" [National deputies]. Elecciones Nacionales 2013 (in Spanish). Interior Ministry of Argentina. October 2013. Retrieved October 31, 2013. 
  53. ^ "Diputados nacionales" [National deputies]. Elecciones Nacionales 2013 (in Spanish). Interior Ministry of Argentina. October 2013. Retrieved October 31, 2013. 
  54. ^ "Senadores nacionales" [National senators]. Elecciones Nacionales 2013 (in Spanish). Interior Ministry of Argentina. October 2013. Retrieved October 31, 2013. 
  55. ^ "Diputados nacionales" [National deputies]. Elecciones Nacionales 2013 (in Spanish). Interior Ministry of Argentina. October 2013. Retrieved October 31, 2013. 
  56. ^ "Senadores nacionales" [National senators]. Elecciones Nacionales 2013 (in Spanish). Interior Ministry of Argentina. October 2013. Retrieved October 31, 2013. 
  57. ^ "Diputados nacionales" [National deputies]. Elecciones Nacionales 2013 (in Spanish). Interior Ministry of Argentina. October 2013. Retrieved October 31, 2013. 
  58. ^ "Senadores nacionales" [National senators]. Elecciones Nacionales 2013 (in Spanish). Interior Ministry of Argentina. October 2013. Retrieved October 31, 2013. 
  59. ^ "Diputados nacionales" [National deputies]. Elecciones Nacionales 2013 (in Spanish). Interior Ministry of Argentina. October 2013. Retrieved October 31, 2013. 
  60. ^ "Diputados nacionales" [National deputies]. Elecciones Nacionales 2013 (in Spanish). Interior Ministry of Argentina. October 2013. Retrieved October 31, 2013. 
  61. ^ "Diputados nacionales" [National deputies]. Elecciones Nacionales 2013 (in Spanish). Interior Ministry of Argentina. October 2013. Retrieved October 31, 2013. 
  62. ^ "Diputados nacionales" [National deputies]. Elecciones Nacionales 2013 (in Spanish). Interior Ministry of Argentina. October 2013. Retrieved October 31, 2013. 
  63. ^ "Diputados nacionales" [National deputies]. Elecciones Nacionales 2013 (in Spanish). Interior Ministry of Argentina. October 2013. Retrieved October 31, 2013. 
  64. ^ "Senadores nacionales" [National senators]. Elecciones Nacionales 2013 (in Spanish). Interior Ministry of Argentina. October 2013. Retrieved October 31, 2013. 
  65. ^ "Diputados nacionales" [National deputies]. Elecciones Nacionales 2013 (in Spanish). Interior Ministry of Argentina. October 2013. Retrieved October 31, 2013. 
  66. ^ "Senadores nacionales" [National senators]. Elecciones Nacionales 2013 (in Spanish). Interior Ministry of Argentina. October 2013. Retrieved October 31, 2013. 
  67. ^ "Diputados nacionales" [National deputies]. Elecciones Nacionales 2013 (in Spanish). Interior Ministry of Argentina. October 2013. Retrieved October 31, 2013. 
  68. ^ "Diputados nacionales" [National deputies]. Elecciones Nacionales 2013 (in Spanish). Interior Ministry of Argentina. October 2013. Retrieved October 31, 2013. 

External links[edit]