Ariana (name)

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Ariana
Pronunciation ær.iˈæn.ə, ær.iˈɒ.nə[1]
Gender Female
Other names
See also Ari, Aria, Anna, Ariane, Arianne, Arieana, Areanna, Arionna, Arriana, Aryonna, Aryanna, Arianna, Arihyona, Aryana, Ariadna, Ariadne, Arieanna, Aireanna, Ariya, Aryia[1]

Ariana is a feminine name. Arianna and Ariane are the two most common variations.[2]

Etymology[edit]

The name Ariana has the several possible following origins.

Ariana, the Latinized form of (Greek: ἡ 'Αρειανή/Arianē), was also a general geographical term used by some Greek and Roman authors of ancient period for a district of wide extent in Central Asia,[3] comprising the eastern part of the Persian kingdom, now all of Afghanistan, north east of Iran and southeast of Tajikistan .[4][5] The name of Iran originates from Aryānā meaning "The Land of the Aryans".[6]

The name Arianna is also the Latinized form of the name Ariadne (Greek: Ἀριάδνη; Latin: Ariadna; "most holy", Cretan Greek αρι [ari] "most" and αδνος [adnos] "holy"), the daughter of Minos, King of Crete,[7] and his queen Pasiphaë, daughter of Helios, the Sun-titan,[8] from Greek mythology.

The name can also derive from the Welsh word 'arian', meaning silver.

Name Days[edit]

Popularity[edit]

In the United States, the name Ariana was listed as the seventy-eighth most popular name for babies in 2006, with Arianna at seventy-seven.[9]

Notables[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Behind the Name: Meaning, Origin and History of the Name Ariana
  2. ^ Ariana - meaning of Ariana name
  3. ^ Dictionary of Greek and Roman geography, William Smith, 1870, pp. 210, Aria'na
  4. ^ The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition, 2008
  5. ^ 'Ărĭāna', Charlton T. Lewis, Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Perseus Digital Library.
  6. ^ http://ancienthistory.about.com/od/persianempiremaps/qt/Iran.htm
  7. ^ Homer, Odyssey 11.320, Hesiod, Theogony 947, and later authors.
  8. ^ Pasiphaë is mentioned as Ariadne's mother in Bibliotheke 3.1.2 (Pasiphaë, daughter of the Sun), in Apollonius' Argonautica iii.997, and in Hyginus Fabulae, 224.
  9. ^ Popular Baby Names