Ariel Garten

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Ariel Garten

Ariel Garten (born September 24, 1979, Toronto) is a Canadian artist, scientist and intellectual.[1] She was an avant garde clothing designer with a store called Flavour Hall (now closed) in Toronto, Canada. She is deemed to have made a "significant contribution to the field" [2] for her work in integrating art and science. She is pursuing cutting edge art and performances in other media, including dance, music, percussion, and cutting-edge instruments (such as hydraulophone, quintephone, and other). She creates work that explores the intersection of art and neuroscience.

Garten lectures about interdisciplinary neuroscience topics, such as "The Neuroscience of Morals" (on TVO's Big Ideas televised lecture series),[3] "The Neuroscience of Molecular Gastronomy" [4] and others), as well as psychotherapy and mental health.

Garten is co-founder (with Trevor Coleman) and Chief Executive Officer of InteraXon, a Canadian company specializing in software for Non-invasive Brain-computer interfaces.[5] [6]

Garten is also a psychotherapist trained in Neuro-linguistic programming.[7]

She has performed in many venues, including The Power Plant, and shown at the Art Gallery of Ontario and Banff Center for the Arts and sold her fashion across North America, including Holt Renfrew in Toronto, and lectured in North America and Europe.

She is the daughter of visual artist Vivian Reiss who is known for her large scale oil on canvas works.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The National Post "Creative Chemistry' Sept 9, 2003
  2. ^ "Top 40 Under 40" University of Toronto Magazine, Spring 2004
  3. ^ "Big Ideas" November 4, 2007
  4. ^ http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=9146895776716863215&ei=o41CSpiJDIK2qQL66OmMBg&q=neuroscience+moldcular+gastronomy
  5. ^ Canadian company develops technology controlled by brain waves, which recently was honored at the Premier's Innovations Awards
  6. ^ "The Toronto Star" Feb 26, 2009
  7. ^ "The Globe and Mail Toronto" April 21, 2007