Arika Okrent

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Arika Okrent /ˈɛrɪkə ˈkrɛnt/[1] is an American linguist, known particularly for her 2009 book In the Land of Invented Languages: Esperanto Rock Stars, Klingon Poets, Loglan Lovers, and the Mad Dreamers Who Tried to Build A Perfect Language, a result of her five years of research into the topic of constructed languages.[2] She is also featured in Sam Green's 2011 documentary The Universal Language.

Youth and education[edit]

Okrent was born in Chicago to parents of Polish and Transylvanian descent and was fascinated by languages since an early age, which is what made her pursue a career in linguistics. After Carleton College, she left for Hungary to teach there for a year;[3] she earned an M.A. in Linguistics from the Gallaudet University, and a Ph.D. in Psycholinguistics from the University of Chicago in 2004. She can communicate in English, Hungarian, American Sign Language and Klingon,[2] and has a good passive command of Esperanto.[4][5] She is the niece of writer/editor Daniel Okrent.

Publications[edit]

  • Okrent, Arika (2009). In the Land of Invented Languages: Esperanto Rock Stars, Klingon Poets, Loglan Lovers, and the Mad Dreamers Who Tried to Build A Perfect Language. Spiegel & Grau. p. 352. ISBN 0-385-52788-8. 

References[edit]

  1. ^ Arika Okrent's homepage
  2. ^ a b M. J. Stephey, "Arika Okrent: Speaking Klingon", Time, May 18, 2009. Retrieved 2009-12-07.
  3. ^ http://apps.carleton.edu/curricular/ling/people/alumni/arikaokrent/
  4. ^ Questions Answered: Invented Languages, Schott's Vocab.
  5. ^ Arika Okrent about Esperanto in CNN, September 17, 2010.

External links[edit]