Arizona Department of Corrections

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Arizona Department of Corrections
Abbreviation ADC
Arizona Department of Corrections.jpg
Shoulder Patch
AZ - DOC Badge.png
Current Breast Badge
Agency overview
Formed 1875
Preceding agency Yuma Territorial Prison
Employees 10,000
Annual budget 1,131,935.4
Legal personality Governmental: Government agency
Jurisdictional structure
Operations jurisdiction* State of Arizona, USA
Map of USA AZ.svg
Map of Arizona Department of Corrections's jurisdiction.
Size 113,998 square miles (295,250 km2)
Population 6,500,180 (2008 est.)[1]
General nature
Operational structure
Headquarters Phoenix, Arizona
Agency executive Charles L. Ryan, Director
Website
Arizona Department of Corrections Website
Footnotes
* Divisional agency: Division of the country, over which the agency has usual operational jurisdiction.

The Arizona Department of Corrections is statutory [2] responsible for the incarceration of inmates in 10 prisons in the U.S. state of Arizona. As of November 2013, the ADC manages over 40,956 imprisoned inmates and over 5,873 inmates who have been paroled or that are statutorily released.[3] ADC is also in involved in recruitment and training of Correctional Officers at the Correctional Officer Training Academy (COTA).[4] It has its headquarters in Downtown Phoenix.[5]

Year Total funding
2002 $623.0 Mil.
2003 $626.6 Mil.
2004 $692.7 Mil.
2005 $755.0 Mil.
2006 $825.6 Mil.
2007 $901.3 Mil.
2008 $1020.0 Mil.
2009 $1076.2 Mil.
2013 (Estimate) $1131.9 Mil.

[6][7][8]

Death row[edit]

The male death row is located in the Browning Unit of Arizona State Prison Complex – Eyman. The female death row is in the Lumley Unit of the Arizona State Prison Complex-Perryville, Executions occur at the Central Unit of the Arizona State Prison Complex-Florence. As of 2010 one Arizona death row inmate is confined in West Virginia.[9]

Facilities[edit]

There are currently 48 state prisons, geographically grouped into 14 Complexes and two correctional treatment facilities, for state prisoners in the U.S. state of Arizona. This number does not include federal prisons, detention centers for the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or county jails located in the state.

As of 2007 Arizona had exported more than 2000 prisoners to privately run facilites in Oklahoma and Indiana, a number that would have been higher if not for a riot of Arizona prisoners at the GEO Group's New Castle Correctional Facility on April 27, 2007, protesting the practice.[10] As of 2013, the states of Vermont, California and Hawaii export prisoners to facilities in Arizona.[11]

Fallen officers[edit]

Name Date Notes
James Stiner 18 September 1967 Stabbed
Theodore J. "Ted" Buckley 22 June 1973 Stabbed
Dale E. Morey 22 June 1973 Stabbed
Paul W. Rast 7 September 1975 Assault
Robert K. Barchey 15 November 1993 Car accident
Brent W. Lumley 7 March 1997 Assault
Gabriel B. Saucedo 2 June 2005 Accidental shooting
Douglas Eugene Falconer 31 October 2008 Heart attack

[12]

Employee Organizations[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for the United States, Regions, States, and Puerto Rico: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2008". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 22 March 2009. Retrieved 2009-02-05. 
  2. ^ Arizona Law
  3. ^ Corrections at a glance
  4. ^ COTA
  5. ^ "ADC Contact Information." Arizona Department of Corrections. Retrieved on December 7, 2009.
  6. ^ 2008 Budget
  7. ^ 2009 Budget
  8. ^ 2013 Budget
  9. ^ "Death Row Information and Frequently Asked Questions." Arizona Department of Corrections. Retrieved on August 16, 2010.
  10. ^ http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/31/us/31prisons.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0
  11. ^ http://www.allgov.com/news/controversies/housing-prisoners-from-other-states-has-become-a-320-million-dollar-a-year-industry?news=851761
  12. ^ The Officer Down Memorial Page

External links[edit]