Arizona State Schools for the Deaf and Blind

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The Arizona State Schools for the Deaf and Blind (ASDB) is a state agency of Arizona, with its administrative headquarters in the Tucson Campus in Tucson.[1][2][3] It operates three center schools for the deaf and the blind, and five regional cooperatives throughout the state:

  • the Arizona School for the Deaf- Phoenix Campus, known as the "Phoenix Day School for the Deaf (PDSD)"
  • the Arizona School for the Deaf- Tucson Campus (ASD)
  • and the Arizona School for the Blind-Tucson Campus (ASB)
  • Regional Cooperatives: The regional cooperatives are voluntary partnerships between public education agencies (school districts and charter schools) across Arizona and ASDB. The Cooperative staff serve students and families throughout five regions of Arizona including: North Central, Eastern Highlands, Desert Valleys, Southwest and Southeast. School staff and the Cooperative staff work together in local schools to promote success for students who are deaf, blind, hearing impaired or visually impaired.

Center school sites are full members of the Arizona Interscholastic Association and provide athletics programs.

History[edit]

The first Arizona state legislature in 1912 enacted a provision forming the agency. Classes began in October 1912 with 19 deaf students on a converted residence on the campus of the University of Arizona in Tucson. The first principal was Henry C. White, appointed by Arizona's first governor, George W.P. Hunt.[4] Today, the school is a public corporation operated by a board of directors.

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Contact Us." Arizona State Schools for the Deaf and Blind. Retrieved on February 19, 2012. "ASDB Agency Administration P.O. Box 88510 Tucson, AZ 85754 "
  2. ^ "Office of Children's Health Sensory Program." Arizona Department of Health Services. Retrieved on February 20, 2012. "Tucson: Arizona School for the Deaf and Blind 1200 West Speedway Boulevard Tucson, Arizona 85745"
  3. ^ "Berger Performing Arts Center." Arizona State Schools for the Deaf and Blind. Retrieved on February 20, 2012.
  4. ^ Gannon, Jack. 1981. Deaf Heritage–A Narrative History of Deaf America, Silver Spring, MD: National Association of the Deaf, p. 54 (PDF)