Arizona Women's Hall of Fame

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Arizona Women's Hall of Fame
Ceramic Hopi jar - by-Nampeyo - date-ca. 1880 - from-DC1.jpg
Hopi jar by 1986 inductee Nampeyo
Established 1979
Location Carnegie Center
1101 West Washington
Phoenix, Arizona 85007-2812
Coordinates 33°26′55″N 112°05′13″W / 33.448540°N 112.087001°W / 33.448540; -112.087001Coordinates: 33°26′55″N 112°05′13″W / 33.448540°N 112.087001°W / 33.448540; -112.087001
Website Arizona Women's Hall of Fame

The Arizona Women's Hall of Fame recognizes women natives or residents of the U.S. state of Arizona for their significant achievements or statewide contributions. In 1979, the office of Governor Bruce Babbitt worked with the Arizona Women's Commission to create the Hall of Fame. The first inductees were in October 1981. During its first decade, the Hall of Fame was overseen by the Arizona Historical Society and the Arizona Department of Library, Archives and Public Records. A steering committee would each year select a varying number of women to be inducted. The 1991 inclusion of Planned Parenthood creator Margaret Sanger resulted in disapproval being heard from some in the Arizona Legislature, and funding dried up. With the lone exception of Maria Urquides in 1994, there were no Hall of Fame inductees for over a decade. Inductions finally resumed in 2002, and since that year the Hall of Fame has only inducted new honorees every two years.[1]

Current sponsorship of the Arizona Women's Hall of Fame is provided by the Arizona Department of Library, Archives and Public Records, the Arizona Historical Society, Arizona Humanities Council, Governor's Division for Women and the Sharlot Hall Museum.[2] The Hall of Fame has a permanent exhibit at the Carnegie Center in Phoenix, Arizona.[3]

Inductees[edit]

Arizona Women's Hall of Fame
Name Image Birth–Death Year Area of achievement
Accomazzo, BettyBetty Accomazzo (1926–1989) 2008 Author, editor[4]
Aguirre, Mary BernardMary Bernard Aguirre Mary Bernard Aguirre.jpg (1844–1906) 1983 Educator[5]
Bartlett, KatharineKatharine Bartlett (1907–2001) 2008 Anthropologist associated with Museum of Northern Arizona[6]
Bennett, Helene ThomasHelene Thomas Bennett (1901–1988) 2010 First woman elected to the Yuma School Board, founding member of Arizona Public Health Association[7]
Berry, Rachel Emma AllenRachel Emma Allen Berry Rachel Emma Berry.jpg (1859–1948) 1984 Arizona House of Representatives, first woman in the United States elected to a state legislature[8]
Bevan, Jessie GrayJessie Gray Bevan (1872–1963) 2006 Arizona House of Representatives[9]
Birchett, Guess EleanorGuess Eleanor Birchett (1881–1979) 1989 The Birdlady of Tempe[10]
Birdsall, Alice M.Alice M. Birdsall (1880–1958) 2010 Arizona's second female attorney[11]
Boehringer, C. LouiseC. Louise Boehringer (1878–1956) 2008 First female Superintendent of Schools, Yuma County[12]
Botzum, Clara OsborneClara Osborne Botzum (1894–1986) 1990 Arizona House of Representatives[13]
Bourne, Eulalia "Sister"Eulalia "Sister" Bourne EulaliaBourne2.gif (1897–1984) 1987 Author, educator, rancher[14]
Brown, Polly HicksPolly Hicks Brown (1883–1966) 1989 Rancher, business owner, became a rodeo queen at age 83[15]
Brown, Pauline BatesPauline Bates Brown (1901–1963) 2010 Journalist[16]
Bush, Nellie T.Nellie T. Bush (1888–1963) 1982 Riverboat pilot, justice of the peace, Arizona House of Representatives, Arizona Senate[17]
Cashman, NellieNellie Cashman Ellen Cashman.gif (1845–1925) 1984 Restauranteur, advocated against violence and against pubic hangings, caregiver to orphans[18]
Chapella, GraceGrace Chapella (1874–1980) 1988 Hopi potter[19]
Chaudhuri, JeanJean Chaudhuri (1937–1997) 2013 Indian activist, author and storyteller
Clark, Sister KathleenSister Kathleen Clark (1919–2003) 2008 Roman Catholic nun who established Casa de los Ninos, a nursery for abused infants and toddlers[20]
Clark, Jean MaddockJean Maddock Clark (1909–1991) 2010 Educator, scout leader, first women in Arizona to be awarded the Golden Eaglet from the Girl Scouts of the USA[21]
Coleman, VernellVernell Coleman (1918–1990) 1990 Community activist[22]
Collom, Rose E.Rose E. Collom (1870–1956) 2013 Botanist and authority in the native plants of Arizona
Colter, Mary Elizabeth JaneMary Elizabeth Jane Colter Mary Elizabeth Jane Colter.jpg (1869–1956) 1986 Architect who designed multiple structures in the Grand Canyon National Park[23][24][25]
Colton, Mary-Russell FerrellMary-Russell Ferrell Colton Mary-russel ferrel colton portrait.jpg (1889–1971) 1981 Co-founder of the Museum of Northern Arizona[26]
Crawford, Cordelia AdamsCordelia Adams Crawford (1865–1943) 1981 Early settler known for her healing skills, developed trust and friendship with the Apache[27]
D'Autremont, Helen CongdonHelen Congdon D'Autremont (1889–1966) 1986 Founder Tucson chapter of the League of Women Voters; founding trustee of Prescott College, co-founder Tucson Medical Center, co-founder Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum[28]
Douglas, Margaret BellMargaret Bell Douglas (1880–1963) 1991 Botanist, horticulturalist[29]
Elias, EulaliaEulalia Elias (1788–1865) 1982 Rancher[30]
Evans, Jessie BentonJessie Benton Evans (1866–1954) 1989 Artist[31]
Fly, Mary "Mollie" E.Mary "Mollie" E. Fly (1847–1925) 1989 Photographer, wife of C. S. Fly[32]
Frohmiller, AnaAna Frohmiller (1891–1971) 1982 Politician[33]
Goldwater, Josephine W.Josephine W. Goldwater (1875–1966) 1988 Mother of Barry Goldwater, Arizona's first female golf champion[34]
Guenther, Minnie K.Minnie K. Guenther (1890–1982) 1986 Missionary to the White Mountain Apache Tribe[35]
Hall, SharlotSharlot Hall Sharlot Hall.jpg (1870–1943) 1981 Journalist, poet, historian, namesake of Sharlot Hall Museum[36]
Hamilton, Lucretia BreazealeLucretia Breazeale Hamilton (1908–1986) 2006 Botanist, illustrator[37]
Hammer, Angela HutchinsonAngela Hutchinson Hammer (1870–1955) 1983 Newspaper publisher[38]
Hance, Margaret TaylorMargaret Taylor Hance (1923–1990) 1991 First female Mayor of Phoenix[39]
Hayden, Sallie DavisSallie Davis Hayden (1842–1907) 1984 Rancher[40]
Heard, Maie BartlettMaie Bartlett Heard (1868–1951) 1982 Co-founder Heard Museum[41]
Herron, Laura E.Laura E. Herron (1892–1966) 1983 Educator, physical education[42]
Hopkins, Hallie Bost Wright.Hallie Bost Wright. Hopkins (1885–1978) 1988 Farmer[43]
Hughes, Josephine BrawleyJosephine Brawley Hughes Josephine Brawley Hughes.jpg (1839–1926) 1990 Early settler and wife of Arizona Governor L. C. Hughes[44]
Jimulla, ViolaViola Jimulla (1878–1966) 1986 First chieftess of Yavapai tribe[45]
Johnson, Ann-Eve MansfeldAnn-Eve Mansfeld Johnson (1908–1981) 1987 Historic preservationist, children's advocate[46]
Johnson, VeoraVeora Johnson (1910–2001) 2004 Educator[47]
Keith, Abbie W.Abbie W. Keith (1888–1984) 1987 Arizona Cattle Growers Association[48]
Kerr, Louise LincolnLouise Lincoln Kerr (1892–1977) 2004 Musician[49]
King, Isabella GreenwayIsabella Greenway King Isabella Selmes Ferguson Greenway.jpg (1886–1953) 1981 First U.S. congresswoman from Arizona[50]
Kitt, Edith StrattonEdith Stratton Kitt (1878–1968) 1983 Historian[51]
Linde, Jessie HarperJessie Harper Linde (1887–1965) 1987 Patron of the arts, co-founder American Association of Concert Managers and the Salt River Valley Community Concert Association[52]
Lindeman, Anne E.Anne E. Lindeman (1932–2001) 2010 Arizona House of Representatives, Arizona Senate[53]
Lockett, Hattie GreeneHattie Greene Lockett (1880–1962) 1987 Author, rancher[54]
Lockwood, LornaLorna Lockwood (1903–1977) 1981 Chief Justice, Arizona Supreme Court; first woman state Chief Justice in United States history[55]
Maynard, EthelEthel Maynard (1905–1980) 2006 First African American woman elected to the Arizona state legislature[56]
McGee, Patricia AnnPatricia Ann McGee (1926–1994) 2006 President, Yavapai-Prescott Indian Tribe, granddaughter of Viola Jimulla [45]
Montgomery, Winona E.Winona E. Montgomery (1898–1990) 2004 Educator[57]
Munds, Frances Lillian WillardFrances Lillian Willard Munds Frances Willard Munds.jpg (1866–1948) 1982 Women's suffrage movement, member Arizona Senate[58]
Nampeyo Nampeyo, Hopi pottery maker, seated, with examples of her work, 1900 - NARA - 520084.jpg (1860–1942) 1986 Hopi potter[59]
Neal, Ann CornwallAnn Cornwall Neal (1888–1972) 1983 Community activist[60]
Oldaker, Elizabeth S.Elizabeth S. Oldaker (1884–1975) 1989 Historic preservationist[61]
Orme, Minna VrangMinna Vrang Orme (1892–1970) 1989 Founder of the Orme School[62]
Otero, Sister ClaraSister Clara Otero (1850–1905) 1988 Educator, Roman Catholic nun[63]
Post, Mary ElizabethMary Elizabeth Post (1841–1934) 2002 Educator[64]
Powell, Dorothy ElaineDorothy Elaine Powell (1921–2003) 2013 Community and social activist, advocate for elderly
Quoyawayma (Elisabeth Q. White), PolingayshiPolingayshi Quoyawayma (Elisabeth Q. White) (1892–1990) 1991 Hopi who converted to Christianity, became educated in white schools, and returned to teach on the Hopi Reservation[65]
Redbird, IdaIda Redbird (1892–1971) 1985 Master Maricopa potter [66]
Reinhold, RuthRuth Reinhold (1902–1985) 1986 Aviator[67]
Richey, ThamarThamar Richey (1858–1937) 1988 Educator[68]
Rider, Jane H.Jane H. Rider (1889–1981) 1983 Arizona's first female civic engineer[69]
Riley, Mary V.Mary V. Riley (1908–1987) 1988 First female elected to the White Mountain Apache Tribal Council[70]
Rosenbaum, PollyPolly Rosenbaum (1899–2003) 2006 Arizona's longest-serving state senator[71]
Shannon, ElizabethElizabeth Shannon (1906–1985) 1990 Educator[72]
Shaw, Anna MooreAnna Moore Shaw (1898–1976) 1981 Author, born on the Gila River Indian reservation[73]
Slee, Margaret SangerMargaret Sanger Slee MargaretSanger-Underwood.LOC.jpg (1879–1966) 1991 Birth control advocate[74]
Sekaquaptewa, HelenHelen Sekaquaptewa (1898–1990) 2013 Hopi author and matriarch of the Eagle Clan
Smith, Placida GarciaPlacida Garcia Smith (1896–1981) 1982 Educator[75]
Sorin, Sarah HerringSarah Herring Sorin Sarah Herring Sorin.jpg (1861–1914) 1985 First woman attorney in Arizona and the first woman to try a case in front of the United States Supreme Court unassisted by a male attorney[76]
Sparkes, Grace M.Grace M. Sparkes (1893–1963) 1985 Historic preservationist, tourism booster, community organizer[77]
Steiner, Jacque YellandJacque Yelland Steiner (1929–2003) 2013 Legislator, Founder of the Children’s Action Alliance
Stevens, Minnie McFarlandMinnie McFarland Stevens (1911–1986) 1990 First woman creel census taker, operated the Sterling Springs fish hatchery for twenty-seven years[78]
Tanner, Clara LeeClara Lee Tanner (1905–1997) 2004 Anthropologist, authority on Southwest indigenous culture[79]
Toles, ElsieElsie Toles (1888–1957) 1984 First woman superintendent of public instruction[80]
Urquides, MariaMaria Urquides (1908–1994) 1994 Educator[81]
Vasquez, Carmen SotoCarmen Soto Vasquez (1861–1934) 1984 Founder of El Teatro Carmen[82]
Wauneka, Annie DodgeAnnie Dodge Wauneka (1910–1997) 2002 Navajo Tribal Council, worked to eradicate tuberculosis on the reservation, awarded the Medal of Freedom by Lyndon B. Johnson on December 6, 1963[83]
Wetherill, Louisa WadeLouisa Wade Wetherill (1877–1945) 1985 Authority on Navajo culture[84]
Winsor, ClarissaClarissa Winsor (1880–1974) 1986 Historic preservationist[85]
Woody, Clara T.Clara T. Woody (1885–1981) 1987 Collector of Arizona history[86]
Young, OlaOla Young (1869–1966) 1991 Early settler in Pleasant Valley[87]
Yount, Florence BrookhartFlorence Brookhart Yount (1909–1988) 1990 Physician[88]

Further reading[edit]

  • Qoyawayma, Polingaysi; Carlson,Vada F (1964). No Turning Back; A True Account of a Hopi Indian Girl's Struggle to Bridge the Gap Between the World of Her People and the World of the White Man,. University of New Mexico Press. ISBN 978-0-8263-0439-1. 
  • Shaw, Anna Moore; Tashquinth, Matt (1968). Pima Indian Legends. University of Arizona Press. ISBN 978-0-8165-0186-1. 
  • Blair, Mary Ellen; Blair, Laurence R. (1989). The Legacy of a Master Potter : Nampeyo and Her Descendants. Treasure Chest Books. ISBN 978-1-887896-06-1. 
  • Fischer, Ron W. (2000). Nellie Cashman : Frontier Angel. Talei Publishers. ISBN 978-0-9631772-6-1. 
  • Miller, Kristie (2004). Isabella Greenway : An Enterprising Woman. University of Arizona Press. ISBN 978-0-8165-1897-5. 
  • Sanger, Margaret; Katz, Esther; Engleman, Peter; Hajo, Cathy Moran (2006). The Selected Papers of Margaret Sanger. University of Illinois Press. ISBN 978-0-252-03372-8. 

References[edit]

  • Leavengood, Betty (2007). Grand Canyon Women: Lives Shaped by Landscape. Grand Canyon Association. ISBN 978-0-938216-78-0. 

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Arizona Hall of Fame history". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  2. ^ "Arizona Women's Hall of Fame sponsors". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  3. ^ "Arizona Women's Hall of Fame exhibits". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  4. ^ "Betty Accomazzo". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  5. ^ "Mary Bernard Aguirre". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  6. ^ "Katharine Bartlett". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  7. ^ "Helene Thomas Bennett". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  8. ^ "Rachel Emma Allen Berry". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  9. ^ "Jessie Gray Bevan". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  10. ^ "Guess Eleanor Birchett". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  11. ^ "Alice M. Birdsall". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  12. ^ "C. Louise Boehringer". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  13. ^ "Clara Osborne Botzum". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  14. ^ "Eulalia "Sister" Bourne". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  15. ^ "Polly Hicks Brown". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  16. ^ "Pauline Bates Brown". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  17. ^ "Nellie T. Bush". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  18. ^ Eppinga, Jane (2010). Tombstone. Arcadia Publishing. p. 42. ISBN 978-0-7385-7933-7. 
  19. ^ "Grace Chapella". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  20. ^ "Sister Kathleen Clark". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  21. ^ "Jean Maddock Clark". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  22. ^ "Vernell Myers Coleman". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  23. ^ Leavengood 2007, pp. 15–26.
  24. ^ "Mary Elizabeth Jane Colter Buildings". NPS.gov. Retrieved September 3, 2012. 
  25. ^ "Mary Coulter". Arizona Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved September 3, 2012. 
  26. ^ "Mary Russell Ferrell Colton". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  27. ^ "Cordenia Adams Crawford". Narional Park Service. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  28. ^ "Helen Congdon D'Autremont". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  29. ^ "Margaret Bell Douglas". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  30. ^ "Eulalia Elias". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  31. ^ "Jessie Benton Evans". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  32. ^ "Mary "Mollie" E. Fly". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  33. ^ "Ana Frohmiller". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  34. ^ "Josephine Goldwater". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  35. ^ "Minnie Knoop Guenther". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  36. ^ "Sharlot Madbrith Hall". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  37. ^ "Lucretia Breazeale Hamilton". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  38. ^ "Angela Hutchinson Hammer". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  39. ^ "Margaret Hance, 66, Ex-Mayor of Phoenix". New York Times. May 1, 1990. 
  40. ^ "Sallie Davis Hayden". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  41. ^ "Maie Bartlett Heard". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  42. ^ "Laura E. Herron". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  43. ^ "Hallie Bost Wright Hopkins". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  44. ^ Who's Who in Arizona. Jo Conners. 1913. p. 602. 
  45. ^ a b "Viola Jimulla". Arizona Women's Heritage Trail. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  46. ^ "Ann-Eve Mansfeld Johnson". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  47. ^ "Veora E. Johnson". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  48. ^ "Abbie Ware Crabb Keith". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  49. ^ Fudala, Joan (2007). Scottsdale. Arcadia Publishing. p. 121. ISBN 978-0-7385-4875-3. 
  50. ^ "Isabella Greenway King". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  51. ^ Edgerly, Lois Stiles (1990). Give Her This Day: A Daybook of Women's Words. Tilbury House Pub. pp. 358, 359. ISBN 978-0-937966-35-8. 
  52. ^ "Jessie Harper Linde". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  53. ^ "Anne E. Lindeman". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  54. ^ "Hattie Greene Lockett". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  55. ^ "Judges: Her Honor Takes the Bench". Time. January 29, 1965. 
  56. ^ "Ethel Maynard". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  57. ^ "Winona E. Montgomery". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  58. ^ Walker, Bonnie (September 17, 1985). "Frances Willard Munds, suffragette, senator". The Courier. 
  59. ^ Leavengood 2007, pp. 27–38.
  60. ^ "Amy Cornwall Neal". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  61. ^ "Elizabeth S. Oldaker". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  62. ^ "Minna Vrang Orme". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  63. ^ "Sister Clara Otero". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  64. ^ "Mary Elizabeth Post". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  65. ^ "Polingazsi Qoyawayma". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 2, 2012. 
  66. ^ "Ida Redbird". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  67. ^ "Ruth Reinhold". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  68. ^ "Thamar Richey". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  69. ^ "Jane H. Rider". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  70. ^ "Mary V. Riley". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  71. ^ "Arizona's longest-serving State Senator dies at 103". Today's News-Herald. December 30, 2003. 
  72. ^ "Elizabeth Shannon". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  73. ^ "Anna Moore Shaw". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  74. ^ "Margaret Sanger". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  75. ^ "Placida Garcia Smith". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  76. ^ Allen, Paul L. (October 7, 2006). "Lookin' Back: State's first female attorney argued case before high court". Tucson Citizen. 
  77. ^ "Grace M. Sparkes". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  78. ^ Riley, Glenda (1999). Women and Nature: Saving the "Wild" West. University of Nebraska Press. ISBN 978-0-8032-8975-8. 
  79. ^ "Clara Lee Tanner". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 2, 2012. 
  80. ^ "Elsie Toles". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  81. ^ "Maria Urquides". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  82. ^ "Carmen Soto Vasquez". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  83. ^ The National First Ladies Library (November 16, 2010). Heroes of the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Canton Ohio. p. 3. Retrieved July 12, 2012. Annie Wauneka (1910–1997) ... Presidential Medal of Freedom received December 6, 1963 
  84. ^ "Louise Wade Wetherill". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  85. ^ "Clarissa Winsor". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  86. ^ "Clara T. Woody". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  87. ^ "Ola Young". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  88. ^ "Florence Brookhart Yount". Arizona State Library. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 

External links[edit]